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The Dallas Theater Center is a major regional theater in Dallas, Texas, United States. It produces classic, contemporary and new plays and is the 2017 Tony Award recipient for Best Regional Theater.[1] Dallas Theater Center produces its original works at the Kalita Humphreys Theater (in a building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright), the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House, and the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre as part of the AT&T Performing Arts Center in the Dallas Arts District.

History

Founded in 1959, Dallas Theater Center was one of the first regional theaters in the United States and was marked by the building of the Kalita Humphreys Theater, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Dallas Theater Center was founded primarily as an educational institution under the leadership of Paul Baker, who envisioned DTC as a conservatory with a well-rounded resident company of writers, directors, designers, and actors. During Baker's tenure, Dallas Theater Center became one of the nation's leading producers of experimental interpretations of classics and world premieres, with 35 plays premiering on the Kalita Humphreys Theater stage during his time, including The Latent Heterosexual, Shadow of an Eagle, Blood Money, and Preston Jones' A Texas Trilogy.[2]

In 1982 as Baker transitioned out of Dallas Theater Center, Mary Sue Jones, his longtime creative partner, served as Interim Artistic Director. The sole female to hold this position, Jones took the reins for one year during the search for Baker's permanent replacement. With the arrival of Adrian Hall in 1983, Dallas Theater Center was transformed into a fully professional theater with a resident company of actors. During this time, Dallas Theater Center built the Arts District Theater, a dynamic, flexible space in downtown Dallas designed by scenic designer Eugene Lee (the space was closed in 2005 in preparation for construction of the Wyly Theatre). With access to three separate performance spaces (the basement of the Kalita Humphreys was also used as a theater), Hall produced an eclectic array of work ranging from classics to world premieres, such as his adaptation of Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men. During Hall's tenure, Dallas Theater Center also began its annual production of Charles DickensA Christmas Carol.[3]

Adrian Hall's tenure at Dallas Theater Center was followed by the leadership of Ken Bryant, who joined Dallas Theater Center in 1984 as a stage manager. Bryant died in 1990 before completing his first full season as artistic director. Following a series of guest directors, Richard Hamburger joined Dallas Theater Center as artistic director in 1992. Hamburger's 15-year tenure saw the introduction of The Big D Festival of the Unexpected and the new works series, FRESH INK/Forward Motion. Under Hamburger's leadership, Dallas Theater Center's educational outreach flagship program, Project Discovery, celebrated its 20th consecutive season in 2006–2007. More than 200,000 middle and high school students from across North Texas have attended mainstage productions at Dallas Theater Center through this program. Hamburger was named Dallas Theater Center's first Artistic Director Emeritus in 2007.

In September 2007, Kevin Moriarty joined Dallas Theater Center as the organization's sixth artistic director. In the fall of 2009, Dallas Theater Center created the Diane and Hal Brierley Resident Acting Company. In 2017, DTC was awarded the Regional Theatre Tony Award.[4]

Productions

1959–1960

1960–1961

1961–1962

1962–1963

1963–1964

1964–1965

Down Center Stage

1965–1966

Down Center Stage

1966–1967

Down Center Stage

1967–1968

Down Center Stage

1968–1969

Down Center Stage

1969–1970

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle
The Janus Players

1970–1971

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle
The Janus Players

1971–1972

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle
The Janus Players

1972–1973

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle
The Janus Players

1973–1974

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle
The Janus Players

1974–1975

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle

1975–1976

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle

1976–1977

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle

1977–1978

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle

1978–1979

Down Center Stage
Magic Turtle

1979–1980

Down Center Stage
The Eugene McKinney New Play Reading Series

1980–1981

1981–1982

Down Center Stage
The Eugene McKinney New Play Reading Series

1982–1983

Down Center Stage

1983–1984

1984–1985

1985–1986

1986–1987

1987–1988

1988–1989

1989–1990

1990–1991

1991–1992

1992–1993

The Big D Festival of the Unexpected

1993–1994

The Big D Festival of the Unexpected

1994–1995

The Big D Festival of the Unexpected

1995–1996

The Big D Festival of the Unexpected

1996–1997

The Big D Festival of the Unexpected

1997–1998

1998–1999

1999–2000

The Big D Festival of the Unexpected

2000–2001

2001–2002

2002–2003

2003–2004

Fresh Ink
New plays at the Dallas Theater Center
Touring Production

2004–2005

Fresh Ink
New plays at the Dallas Theater Center
Touring Production

2005–2006

Fresh Ink
New plays at the Dallas Theater Center
Fresh Ink/Forward Motion

2006–2007

Fresh Ink/Forward Motion

2007–2008

2008–2009

2009–2010

2010–2011

2011–2012

2012–2013

2013–2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

References

  1. ^ "Dallas Theater Center - Regional Tony Award®". www.dallastheatercenter.org.
  2. ^ "About". Dallas Theater Center. Retrieved 2020-10-27.
  3. ^ "A Confused Classic: A Christmas Carol | The New England Theatre Geek". webcache.googleusercontent.com. Retrieved 2020-10-27.
  4. ^ Lowry, Mark (2017-06-11). "TheaterJones | Dallas Has a Tony. What Next?". TheaterJones.com. Retrieved 2017-06-12.