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Daniel Caspary
Daniel Caspary 2019.jpg
Member of the European Parliament
Assumed office
1 July 2004
ConstituencyGermany
Personal details
Born
Daniel Caspary

(1976-04-04) 4 April 1976 (age 46)
Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Political party German:
Christian Democratic Union
 EU:
European People's Party
Alma mater
Websitewww.caspary.de
Video Introduction (English) / (German)

Daniel Caspary (born 4 April 1976) is a German politician who has been serving as a Member of the European Parliament (MEP) since 2004. He is a member of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), part of the European People's Party (EPP).[1] Daniel Caspary is now in the fourth legislature of the European Parliament. Daniel Caspary lives in Weingarten. He is married and has five children.[2]

Daniel Caspary was elected chairman of the German CDU/CSU-delegation in the European Parliament in July 2017.[3] He has been deputy-chairman of the Christian Democratic Union in his home-state of Baden-Württemberg since September 2017.[4] The non-governmental organization VoteWatch named Caspary the second-most influential MEP in EU trade policy in November 2016.[5] In March 2017, Politico ranked Caspary as 25th most influential MEP out of all 751 members of the European Parliament.[6] Since 2019, Caspary is the head of the parliamentary Delegation for relations with the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)[7]

Early life and career

Upon graduation from the Thomas Mann Gymnasium in Stutensee, Caspary served in the federal German armed forces as first lieutenant in the reserve. He studied technical economics at the University of Karlsruhe. Alongside his studies he worked as assistant to the State Minister of Agriculture in the state of Baden-Württemberg, Peter Hauk. He interned at J.P. Morgan in Frankfurt and London. After graduation in 2002, he worked at MVV Energie in Mannheim.[8]

Political career

Career in state politics

Between 1999 and 2002, Caspary was deputy-chairman of the Junge Union (JU) Baden-Württemberg, the youth organization of the Christian Democratic Union. From 2001 until 2008 he served as district chairman of the Junge Union in Nordbaden. Caspary has been district-chairman of the CDU Karlsruhe-Land since 2010.[9]

From 1999 until 2009 Caspary was a member of the city council in Stutensee.

Member of the European Parliament, 2004–present

Caspary was elected to the European Parliament in the 2004 elections, where he is a member of the European People's Party. He is a member of the committee on international trade and served as coordinator of the EPP group between 2009 and 2017.[10] From 2015 until 2017, Caspary was the co-chair of the European People's Party trade ministers meetings alongside Jyrki Katainen, vice-president of the European Commission.[11] From 2014 until 2017, he was chief-whip of the German CDU/CSU-delegation in the European Parliament. Caspary was elected chairman of the delegation in 2017.[12] In this position, Caspary is an advisory member of the federal executive board of the Christian Democratic Union and member of the group bureau of the European People's Party.[13][14] Furthermore, as a member of the European Parliament, he is an ex officio member of the committee on the affairs of the European Union in the German Bundestag.[15]

Both in the sixth and seventh European Parliament, Caspary served as rapporteur on the trade agenda for Europe under the Europe 2020 strategy.[16] Likewise, he is rapporteur on the legislative proposal on the access of third-country goods and services to the internal market of the EU in public procurement and access of EU goods and services to the public procurement markets of third countries.[17]

In November 2008, Caspary was among those members of the European Parliament who witnessed the terror attacks on the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in Mumbai, India.[18]

At the party convention of the CDU Baden-Württemberg in September 2017 Caspary was elected deputy-chairman. In the negotiations to form a fourth coalition government under the leadership of Chancellor Angela Merkel following the 2017 federal elections, he was part of the working group on European affairs, led by Peter Altmaier, Alexander Dobrindt and Achim Post.

In May 2018, Caspary was re-established by the CDU Baden-Württemberg for the 2019 European elections. [19]

In the negotiations to form a coalition government under the leadership of Minister-President of Baden-Württemberg Winfried Kretschmann following the 2021 state elections, Caspary co-chaired the working group on European and international affairs, alongside Theresa Schopper.[20][21]

Political positions

Domestic politics

Ahead of the 2021 national elections, Caspary endorsed Armin Laschet as the Christian Democrats' joint candidate to succeed Chancellor Angela Merkel.[22]

Foreign investments

In April 2017, Caspary and nine further MEPs from the European People's Party introduced an initiative to monitor and control investments in strategic sectors in the EU by investors from third countries.[23] He supports the introduction of a review mechanism on the European level.

Parliamentary oversight

In December 2016, the European Parliament adopted a reform of its rules of procedure proposed by Caspary. Minor and major interpellations for written answer were introduced to complement the established practice of parliamentary questions.[24]

In a written question for oral answer Caspary criticised insufficient answers provided to members of the European Parliament by the European Commission.[25] In a plenary speech in April 2017, he emphasised the need for adequate answers to enable MEPs to exercise their oversight function over the European Commission.[26]

Trade policy

As EPP spokesperson on trade Caspary supported the conclusion of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between the European Union and Canada[27] and criticized the blockade by the Walloon region, which delayed the official signing of the agreement in October 2016.

Caspary supports the conclusion of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the EU and the United States of America.[28] In March 2013, he initiated the event series ‘Friends of TTIP’ as a platform for open and controversial discussion for representatives from politics, industries and civil society.

Working conditions in Bangladesh

In the debate about working conditions in Bangladesh resulting from repeated instances of fires and collapses of factory buildings, Caspary argues for a local improvement of working conditions in close cooperation with local authorities.[29]

Import ban on products from Chinese Laogai

Since 2010 Caspary has been advocating to ban the import of goods produced in forced-labour camps in China.[30]

Other activities

Memberships (amongst others):[31]

Recognition

In a ranking of the forty most influential members of the European Parliament, Politico ranked Caspary 16th in May 2016.[32] In a renewed ranking published in March 2017, he was ranked 25th.[33] In November 2016, the non-governmental organization VoteWatch named Caspary the second-most influential MEP in EU trade policy.[34]

Literature

References

  1. ^ "Daniel CASPARY | Home | MEPs | European Parliament". www.europarl.europa.eu. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  2. ^ "Über mich". Daniel Caspary MdEP (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  3. ^ "Vorstand – CDU/CSU-Gruppe im EP". www.cducsu.eu (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  4. ^ "CDU Baden-Württemberg: Landesvorstand". www.cdu-bw.de (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  5. ^ "Who are the EU Parliamentarians that shape EU's trade policy? | VoteWatch". VoteWatch. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  6. ^ "40 MEPs who matter in 2017: the ranking". POLITICO. 2017-03-09. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  7. ^ "Home | Daniel CASPARY | Abgeordnete | Europäisches Parlament".
  8. ^ "Über mich". Daniel Caspary MdEP (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  9. ^ Land, CDU-Kreisverband Karlsruhe. "CDU Kreisverband Karlsruhe Land". www.cdu-ka-land.de. Archived from the original on 2018-01-08. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  10. ^ "Daniel CASPARY". Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  11. ^ Party, EPP - European People's. "Ministerial Meetings". EPP - European People's Party. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  12. ^ "Vorstand – CDU/CSU-Gruppe im EP". www.cducsu.eu (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  13. ^ "Statutenbroschüre der CDU Deutschlands" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2019-05-27. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  14. ^ "Daniel CASPARY" (in German). Archived from the original on 2018-01-05. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  15. ^ "Deutscher Bundestag - VIII. Vorlagen und ihre Behandlung". Deutscher Bundestag (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  16. ^ "REPORT on a New Trade Policy for Europe under the Europe 2020 Strategy - A7-0255/2011". www.europarl.europa.eu. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  17. ^ "REPORT on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the access of third-country goods and services to the Union's internal market in public procurement and procedures supporting negotiations on access of Union goods and services to the public procurement markets of third countries - A7-0454/2013". www.europarl.europa.eu. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  18. ^ Christoph B. Schiltz (November 11, 2008), Bombay-Anschläge – EU-Abgeordnete in Angst Berliner Morgenpost.
  19. ^ "CDU Baden-Württemberg: Landesvorstand". www.cdu-bw.de (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  20. ^ Koalitionsverhandlungen: Arbeitsgruppen Bündnis 90/Die Grünen Baden-Württemberg, press release of April 13, 2021.
  21. ^ Koalitionsverhandlungen: Arbeitsgruppen CDU Baden-Württemberg, press release of April 13, 2021.
  22. ^ Albrecht Meier (April 17, 2021), Söder contra Laschet: Oder fällt die Entscheidung doch erst am Dienstag in der Fraktion? Der Tagesspiegel.
  23. ^ "Proposals for a Union act | Questions and declarations | Plenary | European Parliament". www.europarl.europa.eu. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  24. ^ "Bundestag wird Vorbild für EU-Parlament - EURACTIV.de". www.euractiv.de (in German). 15 December 2016. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  25. ^ "Oral question with debate - Commission's answers to written questions - O-000003/2017". www.europarl.europa.eu. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  26. ^ "Debates - Monday, 3 April 2017 - Commission's answers to written questions (debate)". www.europarl.europa.eu. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  27. ^ "Plenardebatten - Mittwoch, 15. Februar 2017 - Umfassendes Wirtschafts- und Handelsabkommen EU/Kanada - Abschluss des CETA EU/Kanada - Abkommen über eine strategische Partnerschaft EU/Kanada (Aussprache)". www.europarl.europa.eu (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  28. ^ "- "Es macht Sinn, wenn sich die westlichen Volkswirtschaften enger abstimmen"". Deutschlandfunk Kultur (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  29. ^ "Plenardebatten - Donnerstag, 23. Mai 2013 - Arbeitsbedingungen und Arbeitsschutznormen in Bangladesch nach den jüngsten Bränden in Fabriken und dem Einsturz eines Gebäudes (Aussprache)". www.europarl.europa.eu (in German). Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  30. ^ "Kein EU-Verbot für Laogai-Produkte". www.preussische-allgemeine.de. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  31. ^ "Declaration of Financial Interests" (PDF).
  32. ^ "The 40 MEPs who actually matter: the ranking". POLITICO. 2016-05-19. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  33. ^ "40 MEPs who matter in 2017: the ranking". POLITICO. 2017-03-09. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  34. ^ "Who are the EU Parliamentarians that shape EU's trade policy? | VoteWatch". VoteWatch. Retrieved 2018-01-08.