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Darrell Scott
Darrell Scott at Cactus Cafe in Austin, Texas. Photo by Ron Baker (2011).
Background information
Birth nameJames Darrell Scott
Born (1959-08-06) August 6, 1959 (age 62)
London, Kentucky, United States
OriginNashville, Tennessee, United States
GenresCountry
Occupation(s)Singer-songwriter
InstrumentsVocals, guitar, mandolin
Years active1990s-present
LabelsSugar Hill, Full Light

James Darrell Scott, known as Darrell Scott (born August 6, 1959),[1] is an American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist. The son of musician Wayne Scott, he moved as a child to East Gary, Indiana (known today as Lake Station, Indiana). He was playing professionally by his teens in Southern California. Later, Darrell moved to Toronto then Boston. He attended Tufts University, where he studied poetry and literature. He has lived in Nashville, Tennessee since about 1995. He has written several mainstream country hits, and he has also established himself as one of Nashville's premier session instrumentalists. His younger brother, David Scott, occasionally accompanies Darrell on the keyboard.

Musical career

Scott (second-right) with Band of Joy at Birmingham Symphony Hall, October 27, 2010
Scott (second-right) with Band of Joy at Birmingham Symphony Hall, October 27, 2010

Scott has collaborated with Steve Earle, Sam Bush, Emmylou Harris, John Cowan, Verlon Thompson, Guy Clark, Tim O'Brien, Kate Rusby, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Mary Gauthier, Dan Tyminski, and many others. His music has attracted a growing fanbase, and he tours regularly with his own band. His album, Crooked Road, was released May 25, 2010.[2] In early 2005, Scott's Theatre of the Unheard won in The 4th Annual Independent Music Awards for Album of the Year.[3]

He won the 2007 Song of the Year award from the Americana Music Association for his song "Hank William's Ghost"[4] which appears on his album The Invisible Man released in 2006.

In 2010, he was announced as part of the Band of Joy, alongside Robert Plant, credited as performing vocals, mandolin, guitar, accordion, pedal, lap steel and banjo.

In 2010, Brad Paisley's cover of the song "You'll Never Leave Harlan Alive" was the closing song played on the TV drama Justified during the final scene of the final episode of the first season. It was used again in the final episode of the second season.[5] The fourth season's final episode used a version by Dave Alvin.[6] The fifth season's final episode used a version by the Ruby Friedman Orchestra.[7] The final episode of the series featured the original composition by Darrell Scott himself.[8]

In January 2011, his album A Crooked Road won the award for the Country Album category from The 10th Annual Independent Music Awards.[9]

Darrell Scott (2008)
Darrell Scott (2008)

Songs by Darrell Scott covered by other musicians

This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately.Find sources: "Darrell Scott" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Singles composed with others

Discography

Year Title Label Peak chart positions
US Country
[11]
US
Heat

[12]
US
Folk

[13]
US
Grass

[14]
1997 Aloha From Nashville JustUs
1999 Family Tree Sugar Hill
2000 Real Time (with Tim O'Brien) Full Light
2003 Theatre of the Unheard
2004 Live in NC (with Danny Thompson and Kenny Malone)
2006 The Invisible Man
2008 Modern Hymns Appleseed
2010 A Crooked Road Full Light 32 13
2012 Long Ride Home 55 22 14
Live: We're Usually a Lot Better Than This
(with Tim O'Brien)
64 35 3
2013 Memories and Moments (with Tim O'Brien) Full Skies 36 9 13 2
2015 Ten: Songs of Ben Bullington Full Light
2016 Couchville Sessions 41 24 21
2020 Sings the Blues of Hank Williams[15]
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

Awards

Awards Preceded byJames McMurtry AMA Song of the Year (Songwriter)2007 Succeeded byHayes Carll & Brian Keane

References

  1. ^ "Darrell Scott | Music Biography, Credits and Discography". AllMusic. August 6, 1959. Retrieved July 16, 2014.
  2. ^ "A Crooked Road – Darrell Scott | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards". AllMusic. May 25, 2010. Retrieved July 16, 2014.
  3. ^ [1] Archived July 2, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ [2] Archived June 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ "Justified: "You'll Never Leave Harlan Alive"". TV.com. Retrieved July 16, 2014.
  6. ^ "Justified Season 4 Finale, Episode 13 Ghosts". Ace Weekly. Retrieved July 16, 2014.
  7. ^ Sepinwall, Alan (April 8, 2014). "Season finale review: Justified – Restitution: Daddys home?". Hitfix.com. Retrieved July 16, 2014.
  8. ^ Bianculli, David (April 15, 2015). "'Justified' Ends With An Unpredictable, Poetic And Memorable Finale". Fresh Air. NPR. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  9. ^ "Darrell Scott". Independentmusicawards.com. Retrieved July 16, 2014.
  10. ^ Maxida Märak. "Maxida Märak". Downhillbluegrassband.com. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  11. ^ "Darrell Scott Album & Song Chart History – Country Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  12. ^ "Darrell Scott Album & Song Chart History – Heatseekers Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  13. ^ "Darrell Scott Album & Song Chart History – Folk Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved February 9, 2012.
  14. ^ "Bluegrass Albums Week of October 27, 2012". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved October 18, 2012.
  15. ^ Horowitz, Hal. "Darrell Scott Offers Bluesy Tribute to Hank Williams On New Album". American Songwriter. Retrieved May 24, 2020.