David Calder
Personal information
Born (1978-05-21) May 21, 1978 (age 44)
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Rowing the final (in red/white) of the men's coxless pair at the 2012 Summer Olympics.
Rowing the final (in red/white) of the men's coxless pair at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

David C D Calder OLY[1] (born May 21, 1978) is a Canadian rower. He was born in Victoria, British Columbia. He graduated from Brentwood College School (Mill Bay, British Columbia) in 1996.

He has competed at four Olympics: 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Competing at the Beijing 2008 Summer Olympics, he won the silver medal in the rowing event Men's coxless pair along with Scott Frandsen. They were the first Canadians to win a medal at the 2008 Olympics, when they won silver,[2] for which Terry Paul was their coach.[3]

He holds the British Columbia 2000 metre ergometer record at the Junior A (Under-19) level with a time of 5:59.9, a time set in 1996 while a student at Brentwood College.[4]

Electoral record

2017 British Columbia general election: Saanich South
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
New Democratic Lana Popham 11,921 42.47 −3.08 $59,661
Liberal David Calder 8,716 31.05 −4.24 $66,005
Green Mark Neufeld 7,129 25.39 +10.10 $15,073
Libertarian Andrew Paul McLean 177 0.63 $0
Vancouver Island Party Richard Percival Pattee 130 0.46 $1,570
Total valid votes 28,073 100.00
Total rejected ballots 126 0.45 +0.12
Turnout 28,199 70.63 +3.52
Registered voters 30,926
Source: Elections BC[5][6]

References

  1. ^ "OLY Canada Commission created to empower Team Canada Olympians". Canadian Olympic Committee. April 29, 2021. Retrieved August 16, 2021.
  2. ^ "Frandsen and Calder win silver in rowing". TSN. August 16, 2008. Retrieved February 9, 2009.
  3. ^ Smith, Beverley (July 28, 2012). "Canadian rowing team of Calder, Frandsen want gold". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  4. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 26, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "2017 Provincial General Election - Statement of Votes" (PDF). Elections BC. Retrieved January 29, 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ "Election Financing Reports". Elections BC. Retrieved September 13, 2020.