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David Llewellyn-Smith (born 16 March 1967) is an Australian writer and independent publisher in the field of macroeconomics.[1]

Early life and education: David Llewellyn-Smith was born in Sydney, Australia.

Career

Llewellyn-Smith was the founding publisher of The Diplomat, an Australian international business and politics magazine, in 2000,[2][3][4] and was its publisher and later Editor-in-Chief for eight years. The magazine published special issues "Global 100", "FDI 100" and "SMEGlobal100" in conjunction with Ibisworld. The magazine was sold in 2007 and it now operates online as an international relations website for the Asian region.

In 2009, Llewellyn-Smith co-authored The Great Crash of 2008 with Australian economist Ross Garnaut.[5][6] The book was published by Melbourne University Press. The authors attribute the global financial crisis to four factors: global imbalances;[7] global housing bubbles, the emergence of "clever money" and increasing greed.[8]

Also in 2009, Llewellyn-Smith created "The Distillery", a five-day-per-week morning column in the Business Spectator. The column critiqued business commentators in major newspapers and remains in circulation in 2014.

In 2010, Llewellyn-Smith contributed to foundation of MacroBusiness, an Australian economics and markets blog.[9] And in 2012 he founded Macro Investor, an independent investment newsletter.

Llewellyn-Smith's articles on economics and political economy have been published in The Sydney Morning Herald,[10] The Age and the ABC's The Drum. He is frequently quoted in news reports on economic topics.[11][12][13]

Criticism

In 2022, in response to a proposed security deal between the Solomon Islands and China, Llewellyn-Smith called for Australia to invade the islands and "engineer regime change in Honiara".[14] In response, South China Morning Post's Alex Lo stated in an opinion piece that Llewellyn-Smith's position was "irrational",[15] and that it "would have been funny if the piece was written by just another right-wing head case".[16]

Notes and references

  1. ^ Burgess, Rob (30 June 2015). "We need to hear the truth about Casino Australia". The New Daily. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  2. ^ McIntyre, Paul (9 September 2004), "'Non-American' Time heavies small local rival.(Brief Article)", Australasian Business Intelligence, COMTEX News Network, Inc (published 8 September 2004), ISSN 1320-6680
  3. ^ "A bet on instability", Australasian Business Intelligence, COMTEX News Network, Inc, 1 April 2009, ISSN 1320-6680
  4. ^ "Will the property bubble burst or simply deflate?". The Bull. 10 July 2011. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  5. ^ Nathan, Andrew J (1 March 2010), "The Great Crash of 2008.("Gravity Shift: How Asia's New Economic Powerhouses Will Shape the Twenty-first Century" and "Strategic Asia 2009-10: Economic Meltdown and Geopolitical Stability")(Book review)", Foreign Affairs, 89 (2), Council on Foreign Relations, Inc: 170, ISSN 0015-7120
  6. ^ Nathan, Andrew J. (1 March 2010). "The Great Crash of 2008; Gravity Shift: How Asia's New Economic Powerhouses Will Shape the Twenty-first Century; Strategic Asia 2009-10: Economic Meltdown and Geopolitical Stability | Foreign Affairs". ISSN 0015-7120. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  7. ^ Verrender, Ian (19 October 2014). "Debunking the great Australian banking myth". ABC News. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  8. ^ "Reading about the Financial Crisis" Archived 8 March 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Andrew W. Lo.24 October 2011.
  9. ^ "Ads sales may be key", Australasian Business Intelligence, COMTEX News Network, Inc, 28 June 2012, ISSN 1320-6680.
  10. ^ "Reserve Bank governor Glenn Stevens versus corporate Australia ". Herald Sun.
  11. ^ Lannin, Sue (9 March 2015). "Investor loan growth limit breached by three major banks". ABC News. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  12. ^ Burgess, Rob (28 April 2015). "Housing myths have been stretched to the limit". The New Daily. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  13. ^ Schlesinger, Larry (23 May 2013). "Proportion of landlords making rental losses peaked in 2008: Macrobusiness". Urban.com.au. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  14. ^ Llewellyn-Smith, David (24 March 2022). "Australia must ready Solomon Islands invasion". MacroBusiness. Retrieved 20 April 2022.
  15. ^ Lo, Alex (7 September 2022). "Bribery is at least more civilised than bombs". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 12 April 2023.
  16. ^ Lo, Alex (24 April 2022). "Why tiny Solomon Islands fuels Five Eyes' paranoia". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 12 April 2023.