David Quammen
David Quammen.jpg
Born (1948-02-24) February 24, 1948 (age 74)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Alma materYale University (B.A., 1970)
University of Oxford (B.Litt., English, 1973)[1]
GenreNon-fiction
SpouseBetsy Gaines Quammen
Website
davidquammen.com

David Quammen (born February 24, 1948) is an American science, nature, and travel writer and the author of fifteen books. His articles have appeared in Outside Magazine, National Geographic, Harper's, Rolling Stone, The New York Times Book Review, The New Yorker, and other periodicals.

A collection of David Quammen's drafts, research, and correspondence is housed in Texas Tech University’s Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library. The collection consists of approximately 63 boxes of publicly available literary production, artifacts, maps, and other papers dated between 1856-2014.[2]

Early life and education

David Quammen was born on February 24, 1948 to W.A. and Mary Quammen.[3] He was raised in the suburbs of Cincinnati, Ohio and graduated from St. Xavier High School in 1966. Following this, he was awarded the Rhodes Scholarship, aiding him in attending and graduating from Yale. During his graduate studies at Oxford, he studied literature, concentrating on the works of William Faulkner. After the completion of his education and the publication of his first novel, he relocated to Bozeman, Montana, where he currently lives with his wife, Betsy Gaines Quammen.[4]

Career

In the early 1970s, Quammen moved to Montana for trout fishing. In 1983, he finished The Soul of Viktor Tronko, a spy novel based on Russian historical events. A year later, Blood Line: Stories of Fathers and Sons was published. Following the failure of his spy novel, Quammen began transitioning into a nonfiction writer.[5]

In 1981, Quammen began writing columns for Outside Magazine, and continued for fifteen years. Some of the columns from Outside Magazine and others contributed to Quammen's nonfiction books: Natural Acts (1985), The Flight of the Iguana (1988), Wild Thoughts from Wild Places (1998), and The Boilerplate Rhino (2000).[6]

Later in 1999, Quammen began to write a series of three stories following J. Michael Fay's 2000-mile hike through Central Africa for National Geographic. During this time, Quammen walked with Fay for eight weeks along African river basins. Quammen continued working with National Geographic, holding a Contributing Writer position, producing cover stories like "Was Darwin Wrong?" and "The Short Happy Life of a Serengeti Lion."[7]

From 2007 to 2009, Quammen was employed as the Wallace Stegner Professor of Western American Studies at Montana State University. Quammen received honorary doctorates from Montana State University and Colorado College. For his work, Quammen was awarded with a Rhodes Scholarship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Lannan Literary Award for nonfiction.[8]

His book Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic (2012) received two awards: the Science and Society Book Award, given by the National Association of Science Writers, and the Society of Biology (UK) Book Award in General Biology. In 2013, Spillover was shortlisted for the PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award.[9] The Song of the Dodo (Scribner, 1996), a study of the bird's extinction won the John Burroughs Medal for nature writing.[10]

Books

Non-fiction

Fiction

Awards and accolades

See also

References

  1. ^ "How Rhodes Scholars Think: Interview with David Quammen", rhodesscholars.wordpress.com, October 17, 2007
  2. ^ "Texas Tech University :: Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library". swco.ttu.edu. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  3. ^ "Quammen, David 1948- | Encyclopedia.com". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  4. ^ "David Quammen fiction and non-fictions science writer. Author of Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic". www.davidquammen.com. Retrieved 2021-10-18.
  5. ^ "David Quammen's Biography". www.davidquammen.com. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  6. ^ "David Quammen's Biography". www.davidquammen.com. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  7. ^ "David Quammen's Biography". www.davidquammen.com. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  8. ^ "David Quammen's Biography". www.davidquammen.com. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  9. ^ "PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award ($10,000) - PEN America". Archived from the original on 5 April 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  10. ^ "Texas Tech University :: Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library". swco.ttu.edu. Retrieved 2021-11-08.
  11. ^ "Texas Tech University :: Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library". swco.ttu.edu. Retrieved 2021-11-22.
  12. ^ "Rhodes Scholars: Complete List, 1903-2013 - The Rhodes Scholarships". 6 November 2013. Archived from the original on 6 November 2013. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  13. ^ a b c "Winners and Finalists Database - ASME". www.magazine.org. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  14. ^ "All Fellows - John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation". Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  15. ^ American Academy of Arts and Letters – Award Winners Archived 2008-10-13 at the Wayback Machine
  16. ^ Bp Natural World Book Prize Archived 2012-10-25 at the Wayback Machine
  17. ^ "Past Winners of The New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism". The New York Public Library. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  18. ^ "Lannan Foundation". Lannan Foundation. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  19. ^ "JBA Medal Award List". research.amnh.org. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  20. ^ MSU News Service – New Stegner professor to hit the ground running Archived 2007-08-20 at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ PEN American Center – 2001 Winners Archived 2012-06-26 at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ "Recipients • Academic Events Committee Colorado College". www.coloradocollege.edu. Archived from the original on 18 March 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  23. ^ "Society for the Study of Evolution". www.evolutionsociety.org. Archived from the original on 22 September 2013. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  24. ^ Bill Ott (June 30, 2013). Richard Ford and Timothy Egan Win Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction. Booklist. Retrieved March 17, 2014.
  25. ^ Annalisa Pesek (July 3, 2013). "2013 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction". Library Journal. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014.
  26. ^ "ALA Unveils 2013 Finalists for Andrew Carnegie Medals". Publishers Weekly. April 22, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2014.