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The exterior of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts in 2009
The exterior of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts in 2009

The Denver Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA) is an organization in Denver, Colorado which provides a showcase for live theatre, a nurturing ground for new plays, a preferred stop on the Broadway touring circuit, acting classes for the community and rental facilities. It was founded in 1972.

The Denver Center for the Performing Arts is the largest tenant of the Denver Performing Arts Complex (DPAC) which is a four-block, 12-acre (49,000 m2) site containing ten performance spaces with over 10,000 seats. It is owned and partially operated by Arts and Venues Denver.

History

Both the DCPA and the DPAC were the vision of Donald Seawell. Finding himself at 14th and Curtis streets in downtown Denver one day and looking at the old Auditorium Theatre and the surrounding four blocks, Seawell had an idea for a first-class arts complex. Seawell's original vision was much broader and included other entities (see Previous Entities below) that no longer are part of the Center.

Ground was broken in December 1974. By 1978 Boettcher Concert Hall — the nation's first in-the-round concert hall — was completed, along with an eight-story, 1,700-space parking garage. By 1979 the Auditorium Theatre had been renovated, creating the state-of-the-art Ellie Caulkins Opera House. Inside the auditorium, two cabaret spaces had been added. The Helen G. Bonfils Theatre Complex opened with four theatres now known as The Wolf, The Singleton, The Kilstrom, and The Jones theatres.

The Temple Hoyne Buell Theatre was completed in 1991, the Seawell Grand Ballroom was added in 1998, and The Weeks Conservatory Theatre opened in 2002.

The Ellie Caulkins Opera House was completely renovated in 2005.

Venues

  1. Temple Hoyne Buell Theatre — 2,880 seats
  2. Ellie Caulkins Opera House — 2,225 seats
  3. Seawell Ballroom — 1,095 capacity
  4. Wolf Theatre — 610 seats
  5. Kilstrom Theatre — 380 seats
  6. Singleton Theatre — 200 seats
  7. Garner Galleria Theatre — 210 seats
  8. Jones Theatre — 200 seats
  9. Weeks Conservatory Theatre — 185 seats

Governance

Now led by President & CEO Janice Sinden, The Denver Center for the Performing Arts is currently[when?] the largest tenant of the Denver Performing Arts Complex. The Denver Center organizes, oversees, and presents work by the following entities:

Events

World Theatre Festival, 1982

The World Theatre Festival was held at the center in July 1982.[2] The festival (which had been held in Baltimore previously, known as the International Theater Festival[3]) comprised a program of 114 performances of 18 plays, by theatre companies from 13 countries, across 25 days.[4] It was organized by Al Kraizer, upon request by the city.[5] The trademark for the event was abandoned after a year.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ Weber, Bruce. "Israel Hicks, Director of August Wilson’s Cycle, Dies at 66", The New York Times, July 7, 2010. Accessed July 8, 2010.
  2. ^ "The Script Was in Serbo-Croatian". Washington Post. 31 August 1982. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  3. ^ "International Theater Festival". The Washington Post. May 31, 1981. Retrieved December 11, 2021.
  4. ^ Schmidt, William E. (27 July 1982). "Baltimore's World Theater (sic) Festival blooms anew in Denver". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 December 2021.
  5. ^ Schmidt, William E. (July 27, 1982). "Baltimore's World Theater Festival blooms anew in Denver". The New York Times. Retrieved December 11, 2021.
  6. ^ "The World Theatre Festival Trademark of The Denver Center For The Performingarts, Inc. - Serial Number 73400547". Alter. 22 October 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2021.

Coordinates: 39°44′41″N 104°59′55″W / 39.744623°N 104.998476°W / 39.744623; -104.998476