Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party is sometimes an official title of a senior Conservative politician of the United Kingdom.

Some are given this title officially by the party, such as Peter Lilley,[1] while others are given the title as an unofficial description by the media, such as William Hague.[2] The first politician to hold the office as such was Reginald Maudling, appointed by Edward Heath in 1965.[3] Distinct from being "second-in-command", there is formally no current position of deputy party leader in the party's hierarchy.[4]

The term has sometimes been mistakenly used to refer to the party's deputy chair.[5]

List of deputy leaders

Name Term began Term ended Concurrent office(s) Leader
Reginald Maudling 4 August 1965[6] 18 July 1972[7] Deputy Leader of the Opposition (1965–1970)[8]
Shadow Foreign Secretary (1965)
Shadow Defence Secretary (1968–1969)
Home Secretary (1970–1972)
Edward Heath
Not in use from 1972 to 1975
The Viscount Whitelaw 12 February 1975[9] 7 August 1991[10] Deputy Leader of the Opposition (1975–1979)[11]
Shadow Home Secretary (1976–1979)
Home Secretary (1979–1983)
Leader of the House of Lords (1983–1988)[12]
Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Not in use from 1991 to 1998
Peter Lilley 2 June 1998[13] 15 June 1999[13] Deputy Leader of the Opposition (1998–1999)[14] William Hague
Not in use from 1999 to 2001
Michael Ancram 18 September 2001[15] 6 December 2005[15] Deputy Leader of the Opposition (2001–2005)[16]
Shadow Foreign Secretary (2001–2005)[15]
Shadow Defence Secretary (2005)[15]
Iain Duncan Smith
Michael Howard
Not in use since 2005

Living former deputy leaders

There are currently two living former deputy leaders:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Peter Lilley, Member of Parliament for Hitchin and Harpenden". The Conservative Party. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 17 July 2016. He stood for the Conservative Leadership in 1997; becoming Shadow Chancellor then Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party Responsible for Policy Renewal until 2000.
  2. ^ Andrew Porter, Political Editor (14 January 2009). "David Cameron anoints William Hague as his deputy". The Telegraph. Retrieved 17 July 2016. ((cite news)): |author= has generic name (help)
  3. ^ Blake, Robert (14 August 1965). "A Watershed in English Politics". The Illustrated London News. Vol. 247. p. 20. The most striking feature, however, of Mr. Heath's reconstruction is the appointment of a Deputy Leader. This is the first time that such a position has been created in the Conservative hierarchy [...]
  4. ^ Guardian editorial (17 June 2015). "The Guardian view on party deputy leaders: a job about nothing". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 July 2016.
  5. ^ Ann Gripper (11 May 2015). "David Cameron's 2015 cabinet: Meet the ministers appointed in all Conservative post-election reshuffle". Daily Mirror. Retrieved 17 July 2016. Robert Halfon will become deputy leader of the Conservative Party.
  6. ^ Ball, Stuart (1998). The Conservative Party Since 1945. Manchester: Manchester University Press. p. 187.
  7. ^ "Heath Faces Cabinet Reshuffle". 24 July 1972. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  8. ^ Wood, J. R. T. (24 December 1966). A Matter of Weeks Rather Than Months: The Impasse between Harold Wilson and Ian Smith. ISBN 9781466934092. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  9. ^ Report on World Affairs. Vol. 56. Commonwealth Parliamentary Association. 1975. p. 71.
  10. ^ "Willie Whitelaw dies aged 81". The Guardian. Press Association. 1 July 1991. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  11. ^ Young, Hugo (18 November 2008). The Hugo Young Papers: Thirty Years of British Politics – Off the Record. ISBN 9780141903606. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  12. ^ "Thatcher's No. 2 Cabinet minister resigns". Upi.com. 10 January 1988. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  13. ^ a b "Parliamentary career for Lord Lilley". parliament.uk. Retrieved 15 May 2021.
  14. ^ Mark D'Arcy. "Democracy Live – Peter Lilley MP". BBC News. Retrieved 3 July 2019.
  15. ^ a b c d "Parliamentary career for The Marquess of Lothian". parliament.uk. Retrieved 15 May 2021.
  16. ^ "Peerage for the Rt Hon Michael Ancram". Gov.uk. 21 October 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2019.