Detlef Schrempf
Detlef Schrempf at NBA All-Star Center Court 2016 (24742228990).jpg
Schrempf in 2016
Personal information
Born (1963-01-21) January 21, 1963 (age 59)
Leverkusen, West Germany
NationalityGerman / American
Listed height6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
Listed weight235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High schoolCentralia (Centralia, Washington)
CollegeWashington (1981–1985)
NBA draft1985 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8th overall
Selected by the Dallas Mavericks
Playing career1985–2001
PositionSmall forward / Power forward
Number32, 11, 12
Coaching career2005–2007
Career history
As player:
19851989Dallas Mavericks
19891993Indiana Pacers
19931999Seattle SuperSonics
19992001Portland Trail Blazers
As coach:
20052007Seattle SuperSonics (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points15,761 (13.9 ppg)
Rebounds7,023 (6.2 rpg)
Assists3,833 (3.4 apg)
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at NBA.com
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at Basketball-Reference.com
FIBA Hall of Fame as player

Detlef Schrempf (born January 21, 1963) is a German-American retired professional basketball player. He played college basketball for the Washington Huskies from 1981 to 1985, and was drafted into the National Basketball Association (NBA) by the Dallas Mavericks in the first round of the 1985 NBA draft, with the eighth overall pick. He was an All-NBA Third Team member in 1995, a three-time NBA All-Star and the NBA Sixth Man of the Year twice.

Schrempf played in the NBA for 16 seasons, including stints with the Indiana Pacers, the Seattle SuperSonics, and the Portland Trail Blazers.[1] In 1996, he reached the NBA Finals with the SuperSonics. He played for the West German, and later German, national team in the 1984 and 1992 Summer Olympics and the 1983 and 1985 EuroBasket championships. Schrempf was inducted into the FIBA Hall of Fame in 2021.[2]

High school and college career

Born in Leverkusen, West Germany, Schrempf played for the youth teams of Bayer Leverkusen, before attending Centralia High School in Centralia, Washington, for one year. As a senior, he led the Tigers to the Class AA (now 3A) state championship in 1981, scoring 24 points in the title game,[3] a 52–43 victory over the Timberline Blazers of Lacey.[4] After graduating he enrolled at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he played for the Huskies under head coach Marv Harshman. With Schrempf, the Huskies won Pac-10 regular-season titles in 1984 and 1985 and made three postseason appearances, reaching the Sweet 16 in 1984. He was named team captain for his senior year.[5] In his career at Washington, he scored 1,449 total points.[6]

Schrempf was named to the All-Pac-10 First Team and The Sporting News All-America Second Team. He was inducted into the Husky Hall of Fame in 1995, and was also named to the University of Washington All-Century Team. While attending UW, he was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and majored in international business.[4]

NBA career

Schrempf was selected eighth overall by the Dallas Mavericks in the 1985 NBA draft He became a regular in NBA rotations after being traded to the Indiana Pacers for veteran center Herb Williams in February 1989.[7] Playing for the Mavericks, he finished second in the NBA with a .478 three-point percentage in 1986–87, and eventually worked his way into the starting lineup. In 1991 and 1992, he won consecutive NBA Sixth Man Awards. In the 1992–93 season, he was the only player in the NBA to finish in the top 25 in scoring (19.1 ppg), rebounding (9.5 rpg) and assists (6.0 apg),[8] and was the first European[9] selected to play in the NBA All-Star Game, the first of his three appearances.

Following the 1992–93 NBA season, Schrempf was traded to the Seattle SuperSonics for forwards Derrick McKey and Gerald Paddio. He ranked second in the NBA in three-point accuracy during the 1994–95 season with a 51.4 three-point field goal percentage and became leader in the NBA in offensive rating the same season with 127 points per 100 possessions. On a Sonics team that also featured Gary Payton, Shawn Kemp, Sam Perkins, and Hersey Hawkins, Schrempf reached the NBA Finals in 1996, where they lost to Michael Jordan's Chicago Bulls in six games. Schrempf became the first (and one of only two, to date, along with Dirk Nowitzki) German-born NBA player to reach the NBA Finals. While with the Sonics, Schrempf played in the NBA All-Star game in both 1995 and 1997.

Schrempf was released by the Sonics in 1999 and signed the same day by the Portland Trail Blazers, with whom he played until his retirement from professional basketball in 2001, playing in a total of 1,136 regular season games and 114 playoff games.

On January 24, 2006, the Seattle SuperSonics hired Schrempf as an assistant coach under Bob Hill, who had coached Schrempf when he played for the Indiana Pacers.[10]

International career

Schrempf played for the West Germany national team in the 1984 Olympics and for the 1983 and 1985 EuroBaskets. In 1992, he played for the German Olympic team.[11]

Charitable work

Schrempf established the Detlef Schrempf Foundation in 1996 to benefit local charities. In January 2012, he won the Paul Allen Award for Citizenship (formerly the Seattle Sports Commission Sports Citizen of the Year) at the 77th annual Sports Star of the Year banquet in Seattle.[12] His foundation hosts the Detlef Schrempf Celebrity Golf Classic at McCormick Woods Golf Course in Port Orchard, Washington, each summer and has raised about $10 million for children's charities in the Pacific Northwest.[13]

Personal life

Schrempf is married to Mari Schrempf. They have two sons, Alex and Michael.[14] Since 2010, Schrempf has been the Business Development Officer at Coldstream Capital, a wealth management firm in Seattle.[15][16][17]

In popular culture

Career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

NBA statistics

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1985–86 Dallas 64 12 15.1 .451 .429 .724 3.1 1.4 .4 .2 6.2
1986–87 Dallas 81 5 21.1 .472 .478 .742 3.7 2.0 .6 .2 9.3
1987–88 Dallas 82 4 19.4 .456 .156 .756 3.4 1.9 .5 .4 8.5
1988–89 Dallas 37 1 22.8 .426 .125 .789 4.5 2.3 .6 .2 9.5
1988–89 Indiana 32 12 31.4 .514 .263 .772 7.2 2.9 .9 .3 14.8
1989–90 Indiana 78 18 33.0 .516 .354 .820 7.9 3.2 .8 .2 16.2
1990–91 Indiana 82 3 32.1 .520 .375 .818 8.0 3.7 .7 .3 16.1
1991–92 Indiana 80 4 32.6 .536 .324 .828 9.6 3.9 .8 .5 17.3
1992–93 Indiana 82 60 37.8 .476 .154 .804 9.5 6.0 1.0 .3 19.1
1993–94 Seattle 81 80 33.7 .493 .324 .769 5.6 3.4 .9 .1 15.0
1994–95 Seattle 82 82 35.2 .523 .514 .839 6.2 3.8 1.1 .4 19.2
1995–96 Seattle 63 60 34.9 .486 .408 .776 5.2 4.4 .9 .1 17.1
1996–97 Seattle 61 60 35.9 .492 .354 .801 6.5 4.4 1.0 .3 16.8
1997–98 Seattle 78 78 35.2 .487 .415 .844 7.1 4.4 .8 .2 15.8
1998–99 Seattle 50 39 35.3 .472 .395 .823 7.4 3.7 .8 .5 15.0
1999–00 Portland 77 6 21.6 .432 .404 .833 4.3 2.6 .5 .2 7.5
2000–01 Portland 26 0 15.3 .411 .375 .852 3.0 1.7 .3 .1 4.0
Career 1,136 524 29.6 .491 .384 .803 6.2 3.4 .8 .3 13.9
All-Star 3 0 17.0 .455 .250 .333 3.7 2.3 .0 .3 7.7

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1986 Dallas 10 0 12.0 .464 .000 .647 2.3 1.4 .2 .1 3.7
1987 Dallas 4 0 24.3 .371 .000 .455 3.0 1.5 .8 .5 7.8
1988 Dallas 15 0 18.3 .465 .333 .706 3.7 1.6 .5 .5 7.8
1990 Indiana 3 3 41.7 .489 .000 .938 7.3 1.7 .7 .3 20.3
1991 Indiana 5 0 35.8 .474 .000 .833 7.2 2.2 .4 .0 15.8
1992 Indiana 3 0 40.0 .383 .500 .893 13.0 2.3 .7 .3 21.0
1993 Indiana 4 4 41.3 .463 .000 .778 5.8 7.3 .3 .5 19.5
1994 Seattle 5 5 34.8 .520 .333 .867 5.4 2.0 .2 .6 18.6
1995 Seattle 4 4 38.3 .404 .556 .792 4.8 3.0 .8 .5 18.8
1996 Seattle 21 21 37.6 .475 .368 .750 5.0 3.2 .7 .2 16.0
1997 Seattle 12 12 38.3 .472 .552 .815 5.8 3.4 1.1 .1 16.9
1998 Seattle 10 10 37.5 .512 .143 .816 7.7 3.9 .7 .1 16.1
2000 Portland 15 0 18.4 .393 .167 .830 3.5 2.0 .3 .0 5.6
2001 Portland 3 0 10.7 .667 .667 .667 1.7 .3 .0 .0 4.7
Career 106 51 29.3 .465 .373 .789 5.0 2.6 .5 .2 12.6

International statistics

Year Competition GP MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1983 EuroBasket
1984 Olympic Games
1985 EuroBasket
1992 Olympic Games
Career 71

See also

References

  1. ^ "Detlef Schrempf Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  2. ^ "Daly, Giannakis and Messina headline FIBA Hall of Fame Class of 2021". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved April 1, 2021.
  3. ^ "Schrempf leads Centralia in AA". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). UPI. March 16, 1981. p. 18.
  4. ^ a b "Flashback: Centralia H.S. took magical ride with Schrempf in 1981" The Seattle Times (March 22, 2005).
  5. ^ "2012-13 Husky Basketball Record Book" (PDF). University of Washington. pp. 94–95. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 27, 2019. Retrieved May 1, 2022.
  6. ^ "Detlef Schrempf College Stats". Sports Reference. Retrieved May 1, 2022.
  7. ^ "MAVERICKS TRADE SCHREMPF TO PACERS". Deseret News. February 22, 1989. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  8. ^ "NBA Players - NBA.com". NBA.com. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  9. ^ "The all time list of European NBA All Stars". Eurohoops. February 14, 2020. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  10. ^ "SONICS: Schrempf Perfect Fit For Sonics". www.nba.com. Archived from the original on October 24, 2007. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  11. ^ "BARCELONA '92 OLYMPICS : DAILY REPORT : MEN'S BASKETBALL : Germany Comes Back to Beat Spain, 83-74". July 27, 1992. Retrieved October 7, 2018 – via LA Times.
  12. ^ "NBA.com - Detlef Schrempf: Paul Allen Award Recipient". www.nba.com. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  13. ^ "Detlef Schrempf Celebrity Golf Classic & Gala Auction" (June 24, 2011).
  14. ^ "Player Bio: Alex Schrempf". Archived from the original on May 24, 2013. Retrieved March 14, 2013.
  15. ^ "Detlef Schrempf Director of Business Development - Coldstream Wealth Management". Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  16. ^ Sports Illustrated, August 2, 2010, Inside the NHL by Sarah Kwak, p.43, Published by Time Inc.
  17. ^ "About the Foundation". www.detlef.com. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  18. ^ The Detlef Schrempf Generation Archived August 14, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ a b "Detlef Schrempf". IMDb. Retrieved October 7, 2018.