Dibunate
Clinical data
Trade namesAducin, Becantal, Becantex, Bechisan, Bexedyl, Keuten, Linctussal, Pectoro
ATC code
Identifiers
  • 2,6-Di-tert-butylnaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.035.511 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H24O3S
Molar mass320.45 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • O=S(=O)(O)c1c2c(ccc1C(C)(C)C)cc(cc2)C(C)(C)C
  • InChI=1S/C18H24O3S/c1-17(2,3)13-8-9-14-12(11-13)7-10-15(18(4,5)6)16(14)22(19,20)21/h7-11H,1-6H3,(H,19,20,21) checkY
  • Key:WBEBQCINXJDZCX-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  (verify)

Dibunate is a cough suppressant.[1] As the sodium salt, it has been marketed under the name Becantyl (in the United Kingdom), Becantex (in continental Europe), or Linctussal with a dosage of 20 to 30 mg, as either syrup or tablets.[2]

Similar to benzonatate, it is a peripherally acting drug. It has not been reported to cause sedation, euphoria, habituation, or respiratory depression, unlike narcotic antitussives such as codeine. It may work by blocking afferent signals in the reflex arc which controls cough.[3] Nausea is rarely seen as an adverse effect.[4]

References

  1. ^ Sevelius H, Colmore JP (1967). "Antitussive effect of ethyl dibunate in patients with chronic cough". Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 8 (3): 381–4. doi:10.1002/cpt196783381. PMID 5338382.
  2. ^ "To-day's drugs: Cough suppressants". Br Med J. 1 (5391): 1165-1167. May 2, 1964. PMC 1813498. PMID 14120813.
  3. ^ Simon SW (1957). "A comparative study of two new non-narcotic antitussive drugs". Ohio State Med J. 53 (12): 1426-7. PMID 13493953.
  4. ^ Schlesser JL (1991). Drugs Available Abroad, 1st Edition. Derwent Publications Ltd. p. 63. ISBN 0-8103-7177-4.