District Council of Hawker
South Australia
District Council of Hawker is located in South Australia
District Council of Hawker
District Council of Hawker
Coordinates31°53′26″S 138°25′23″E / 31.890640°S 138.423187°E / -31.890640; 138.423187
Established1888
Abolished1997[1]
Council seatHawker
LGAs around District Council of Hawker:
District Council of Hawker
Davenport/ Woolundunga Kanyaka
Kanyaka-Quorn
Eurelia/ Carrieton

The District Council of Hawker was a local government area in South Australia from 1888 to 1997, centred on the town of Hawker. At its creation it was the northernmost local government area in the state.

History

It was established on 5 January 1888 under the provisions of the District Councils Act 1887. It comprised the hundreds of Arkaba in the County of Hanson, Barndioota and Wonoka in the County of Blachford, and Wirreanda and Yednalue in the County of Granville.[2] Land from each of the hundreds of Adams and Warcowie was added to the District Council on 12 May 1932.[3] In 1936, it was reported to have an estimated population of 975 across an area of 300 square miles. In that year, the council elected a member from five wards, one for each of the initial hundreds. The main industry of the district was wool growing, replacing wheat farming, which had been popular in earlier days.[4] It amalgamated with the District Council of Kanyaka-Quorn to form the Flinders Ranges Council on 1 January 1997.[1]

Chairmen

References

  1. ^ a b Ashenden, E.S. (12 December 1996). "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1934 SECTIONS 7 AND 14: AMALGAMATION OF THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF HAWKER AND THE DISTRICT COUNCIL OF KANYAKA-QUORN" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Government of South Australia. pp. 1850–1852. Retrieved 31 December 2018.
  2. ^ "The District Councils Act 1887 No. 419". Government of South Australia. Retrieved 14 November 2015 – via Flinders University. District of Hawker.—Comprising the Hundreds of Arkaba, Barndioota, Wirreanda, Wonoka, and Yednalue.
  3. ^ Denny, W.J. (12 May 1932). "LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREAS (RE-ARRANGEMENT) ACTS, 1929 AND 1931.-—AREA EXTENDED" (PDF). The South Australian Government Gazette. Government of South Australia. p. 857. Retrieved 31 December 2018.
  4. ^ Hosking, P. (1936). The Official civic record of South Australia : centenary year, 1936. Adelaide: Universal Publicity Company. p. 615.
  5. ^ "Hawker". The Port Augusta Dispatch, Newcastle and Flinders Chronicle. SA. 3 February 1888. p. 3. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Hawker District Council". The Port Augusta Dispatch, Newcastle and Flinders Chronicle. SA. 12 June 1888. p. 3. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "Hawker". The Port Augusta Dispatch, Newcastle and Flinders Chronicle. SA. 27 July 1888. p. 2. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Hawker". The Port Augusta Dispatch, Newcastle and Flinders Chronicle. SA. 19 October 1888. p. 3. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "HAWKER DISTRICT COUNCIL". The Advertiser. Adelaide. 6 June 1889. p. 6. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "Hawker". Kapunda Herald. Adelaide. 22 June 1912. p. 18. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "EVOLUTION OF A CHAPEL". The Register. Adelaide. 7 July 1913. p. 10. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "MAIN ROADS COMMISSION". Daily Herald. Adelaide. 20 November 1914. p. 3. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "HAWKER. DISTRICT COUNCIL". Petersburg Times. Adelaide. 21 July 1917. p. 10. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "BAZAAR AT HAWKER". The Southern Cross. Adelaide. 31 May 1918. p. 15. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "PERSONAL". The Chronicle. Adelaide. 27 July 1918. p. 32. Retrieved 3 December 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h Matthews, Penny (1986), South Australia, the civic record, 1836–1986, Wakefield Press, pp. 208–212, ISBN 978-0-949268-82-2