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Don Haggerty
Haggerty in Cause for Alarm! (1951)
Born(1914-07-03)July 3, 1914
DiedAugust 19, 1988(1988-08-19) (aged 74)
Alma materBrown University
OccupationActor
Years active1952–1981

Don Haggerty (July 3, 1914 – August 19, 1988) was an American actor of film and television. Before he began appearing in films in 1947, Haggerty was a Brown University athlete and served in the United States military.

Career

Usually cast as tough policemen or cowboys, Haggerty appeared in films such as Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), The Asphalt Jungle (1951), Angels in the Outfield (1951) and The Narrow Margin. The B-movie actor continued to appear in films until the early 1980s.

Between 1949 and 1955, Haggerty made four guest appearances in the television series The Lone Ranger – twice as outlaws, once as a crooked sheriff and once as a genuine sheriff. From 1954 to 1955, he starred in the syndicated private eye series The Files of Jeffrey Jones. In the 1955–1956 season, Haggerty appeared as the outlaw Sam Bass in an episode of Jim Davis's syndicated Stories of the Century. About this time, he also appeared on CBS in the Reed Hadley legal drama The Public Defender. He played the lead role in the DuMont series The Cases of Eddie Drake (filmed 1949, aired 1952).

In 1956–1957, Haggerty appeared as Sheriff Elder in nine episodes of the syndicated western-themed crime drama State Trooper. He appeared in three episodes of the syndicated western 26 Men. In 1959, he guest starred in Bruce Gordon's NBC docudrama about the Cold War, Behind Closed Doors.

Haggerty appeared 21 times, including 19 in 1955 and 1956, as newspaperman Marsh Murdock in the ABC/Desilu western series The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp. In 1960, he appeared as Marshal Bill Thompson in the episode "Alibi" on the ABC/Warner Brothers western series Colt .45.

In 1959, Haggerty portrayed Harry Moxton in the episode "No Laughing Matter" of the NBC crime drama Richard Diamond, Private Detective. Also in 1959, he guest starred on the TV western series Bat Masterson as crooked casino owner Jess Porter.

In 1960, Haggerty appeared as Joe Haynes on the TV western Tales of Wells Fargo in the episode "Doc Dawson". Haggerty guest starred in 1960 in the NBC crime drama Dan Raven and the CBS Rawhide episode "Incident of the Silent Web" in the role of Chaney. He also appeared in the NBC western series The Californians and Riverboat.

Haggerty was cast as United States Attorney W. H. H. Clayton in the 1961 episode "A Bullet for the D.A." of the anthology series Death Valley Days. In 1967, he played Horace Tabor in another Death Valley Days episode, "Chicken Bill". Earlier, Haggerty played Sheriff Wheeler in the 1966 Death Valley Days episode "The Fastest Nun in the West". In another 1966 episode of the same series, "Water Bringer", Haggerty was cast as the embittered Captain Hayworth of the ship Orion. In the 1969 Death Valley Days episode "Old Stape", Haggerty played an eccentric thief who outwits lawmen from his rundown shack along the border of the United States and the Republic of Texas.

Haggerty was cast as Joe Wine in the 1961 episode "Alien Entry" of another syndicated series, The Blue Angels. About this time, he guest starred in the episode "The Green Gamblers" of the syndicated crime drama The Brothers Brannagan. He was also cast in 1963 in an episode of the NBC modern western series Redigo. Haggerty appeared as a guest star in My Favorite Martian as Detective Sergeant Heeley in 1964's episode "Uncle Martin's Broadcast" and as a bank guard in 1965's "Hate Me a Little". In 1967, he portrayed a sheriff on Rango in the episode "A Little Mexican Town." He appeared on Bonanza seven times in various roles between 1962 and 1972. In 1981 he played Bo Thompson on Charlie's Angels in Waikiki Angels, the fifth episode of Season 5.

Selected filmography

References