President Donald Trump entered office with a significant number of judicial vacancies,[1] including a Supreme Court vacancy due to the death of Antonin Scalia in February 2016. During the first eight months of his presidency, he nominated approximately 50 judges, a significantly higher number than any other recent president had made by that point in his presidency.[2] By June 24, 2020, 200 of his Article III nominees had been confirmed by the United States Senate.[3] According to multiple media outlets, Trump significantly impacted the composition of the Supreme Court and lower courts during his tenure.[4][5][6][7][8]

As of February 3, 2020, the American Bar Association (ABA) had rated 220 of Trump's nominees. Of these nominees, 150 were rated "well-qualified," 61 were rated "qualified," and 9 were rated "not qualified."[9] Seven of the nine individuals rated as "not qualified" have been confirmed by the Senate.[10] According to Vox's Ian Millhiser, "based solely on objective legal credentials, the average Trump appointee has a far more impressive résumé than any past president’s nominees."[11]

As of July 2020, the judges appointed by Trump are "85% white and 76% male; less than 5% are African-American,” as a result of which the federal judiciary has become "less diverse" compared to previous administrations, according to an analysis by The Conversation.[12]

Supreme Court

Confirmed nominees

Supreme Court of the United States

Appellate nominees

Failed nominees

United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Confirmed nominees

United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

District court nominees

Failed nominees

United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama

United States District Court for the District of Alaska

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas

United States District Court for the District of Columbia

United States District Court for the Northern District of New York

United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin

Northern, Eastern, and Western Districts of Oklahoma

United States District Court for the Western District of Michigan

United States District Court for the District of New Mexico

United States District Court for the Central District of California

United States District Court for the Eastern District of California

United States District Court for the Southern District of California

United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York

United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

Confirmed nominees

United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee

United States District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana

United States District Court for the District of Utah

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri

United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas

United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida

United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio

Article I court nominees

Confirmed nominees

United States Court of Federal Claims

Failed nominees

United States Court of Federal Claims

See also

References

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