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Duchy of Genoa
Ducato di Genova (Italian)
Ducâto de Zêna (Ligurian)
1815–1848
Flag of Genoa
StatusPart of Savoy
CapitalGenoa
Common languagesLigurian, Italian
Religion
Catholic Church
Demonym(s)Genoese
GovernmentAbsolute monarchy
Duke 
• 1815–1821
Victor Emmanuel
• 1821–1831
Charles Felix
• 1831–1848
Charles Albert
Historical eraLate modern
9 June 1815
1848
CurrencyLira
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Republic of Genoa
Kingdom of Sardinia
Today part ofFrance
Italy

The Duchy of Genoa (Italian: Ducato di Genova) (Ligurian: Ducâto de Zêna) was a country consisting of the territories of the former Republic of Genoa. It was formed when the former territories of the republic were given to the Kingdom of Sardinia in 1815 as a result of the Congress of Vienna, and dissolved after the Perfect Fusion of 1848.

Ligurian people, with their independentistic and republican traditions, never liked their new political status, and riots sometimes exploded in Genoa.

The state used the Italian Lira as its currency, although the Mint of Genoa remained in operation by issuing coins.[1]

After dissolution in 1848, the territories of the former duchy were divided between the departments (later called provinces) of Genoa and Nice.

Administration

Replacing the French legislation in force, a specially introduced code was put into place, called; The regulation of the S.M. for civil and criminal matters of the Duchy of Genoa. (Italian: Il regolamento de S.M. per li materie civili e criminali, di Ducato di Genova.), promulgated in 13 May 1815 with the senate of Genoa ordered to register it and enforce it.

An edict in 1822 ruled out that, justice, dependent on the senate of Genoa, was administered by 7 prefecture courts: Genoa, Bobbio, Chiavari, Finale Marina, Novi Ligure, Sarzana and Savona.

In 1833, the Duchy of Genoa was one of the eight general intendencies of the States of the Mainland which were at the same time military divisions. It included the provinces of Genoa, Savona, Cairo Montenotte, Albenga, Finale Marina, Gavi, Bobbio, Chiavari, La Spezia and Sarzana.

See also

References

  1. ^ M. Cipolla, Carlo. Le avventure della lira (in Italian). Il Mulino.