East Haddam, Connecticut
Location within Middlesex County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°29′N 72°24′W / 41.483°N 72.400°W / 41.483; -72.400Coordinates: 41°29′N 72°24′W / 41.483°N 72.400°W / 41.483; -72.400
Country United States
U.S. state Connecticut
CountyMiddlesex
Metropolitan areaHartford
Incorporated1734
Government
 • TypeSelectman–town meeting
 • First selectmanIrene Haines (R)
Area
 • Total56.6 sq mi (146.6 km2)
 • Land54.3 sq mi (140.7 km2)
 • Water2.2 sq mi (5.8 km2)
Elevation
486 ft (148 m)
Population
 (2010)[1]
 • Total9,126
 • Density161.2/sq mi (62.2/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
06423, 06469
Area code(s)860/959
FIPS code09-22280
GNIS feature ID0213422
Websitewww.easthaddam.org

East Haddam is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 9,126 at the 2010 census.

History

Until 1650, the area of East Haddam was inhabited by at least three tribes of Indians: the Wangunks, the Mohegans and the Nehantics. The Indians called the area "Machimoodus", the place of noises, because of numerous earthquakes that were recorded between 1638 and 1899. Loud rumblings, the "Moodus Noises", could be heard for miles surrounding the epicenter of the quakes near Mt. Tom. The land, which is now Haddam and East Haddam, was purchased by settlers from the natives in 1662 for thirty coats – worth about $100.[2]

Layout of the highways began in 1669 with Creek Row about ¼ mile east of the River and Town Street “The Great Highway” about ¼ mile east of Creek Row. The first permanent settlers established homesteads along Creek Row in 1685. By 1700, there were thirty families living in East Haddam. Agricultural and timber farming, shipbuilding, tanneries and blacksmiths were among the early commerce. Captain John Chapman began ferry service across the Connecticut River in 1695, which ended with the completion of the swing bridge in 1913.

East Haddam was incorporated as a separate town from Haddam in 1734. By 1756, there were nearly 2,000 residents, with the Millington District as the most populated. Growth of commerce brought a surge in population to around 3,000 people by the mid-1800s. In the nineteenth century, Moodus was the “Twine Capital of America,” with twelve mills in operation.[3] Visitors and residents such as actor William Gillette whose castle home was completed in 1914, were drawn to the area known for its rural charm and natural scenery. The growth of the resort areas of Lake Hayward, Bashan Lake and Moodus Reservoir began in the early 1900s and was a booming business for the next fifty years.[4]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 56.6 square miles (147 km2), of which, 54.3 square miles (141 km2) of it is land and 2.2 square miles (5.7 km2) of it (3.96%) is water.

Principal communities

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17902,749
18002,8052.0%
18102,537−9.6%
18202,5721.4%
18302,6643.6%
18402,620−1.7%
18502,610−0.4%
18603,05617.1%
18702,951−3.4%
18803,0322.7%
18902,599−14.3%
19002,485−4.4%
19102,422−2.5%
19202,312−4.5%
19302,114−8.6%
19402,2174.9%
19502,55415.2%
19603,63742.4%
19704,67628.6%
19805,62120.2%
19906,67618.8%
20008,33324.8%
20109,1269.5%
2014 (est.)9,127[5]0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]

See also: List of Connecticut locations by per capita income

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 8,333 people, 3,174 households, and 2,285 families residing in the town. The population density was 153.4 people per square mile (59.2/km2). There were 4,015 housing units at an average density of 73.9 per square mile (28.5/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.26% White, 0.84% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.46% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.98% of the population.

There were 3,174 households, out of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.3% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.0% were non-families. 21.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $62,304, and the median income for a family was $70,091. Males had a median income of $45,500 versus $36,055 for females. The per capita income for the town was $28,112. About 1.0% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over. 2017 CERT Town Profile, click here.[8]

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 25, 2005[9]
Party Active Voters Inactive Voters Total Voters Percentage
Democratic 1,529 91 1,620 28.72%
Republican 1,181 56 1,237 21.93%
Unaffiliated 2,598 179 2,777 49.24%
Minor parties 5 1 6 0.11%
Total 5,313 327 5,640 100%
Presidential Election Results[10][11]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 51.2% 2,980 46.9% 2,731 1.9% 114
2016 45.9% 2,331 49.0% 2,487 5.1% 259
2012 53.0% 2,471 45.2% 2,109 1.8% 82
2008 58.9% 2,874 39.3% 1,918 1.8% 87
2004 55.4% 2,607 42.7% 2,009 1.9% 89
2000 52.8% 2,186 40.7% 1,687 6.5% 271
1996 45.4% 1,663 32.6% 1,193 22.0% 804
1992 37.3% 1,468 26.5% 1,042 36.2% 1,427
1988 45.5% 1,457 53.1% 1,702 1.4% 44
1984 36.9% 1,112 62.7% 1,885 0.4% 11
1980 38.9% 1,104 46.6% 1,324 14.5% 413
1976 50.4% 1,308 49.3% 1,280 0.3% 9
1972 41.2% 968 57.6% 1,353 1.2% 28
1968 49.1% 1,028 44.1% 922 6.8% 143
1964 67.3% 1,243 32.7% 605 0.00% 0
1960 50.2% 930 49.8% 921 0.00% 0
1956 38.1% 647 61.9% 1,049 0.00% 0

Education

Public

The East Haddam Public School System has about 1,100 students in grades PreK–12; about 121 certified teachers, 70 support staff and 7 administrators. Mr. Brian Reas is superintendent of schools.[12] Located in Moodus, Connecticut, the three schools in the public school system are:

Transition

In 2020, The Nathan Hale-Ray High School and Bacon Academy collaborated and made their 18 to 21 transition programs separate from their schools in Colchester, Connecticut in a small single-story building located on Lebanon Avenue.

Private

Attractions

An auto test track in East Haddam
An auto test track in East Haddam

Cultural

Historical

Bust of Nathan Hale located in the center of town.
Bust of Nathan Hale located in the center of town.

Natural

Notable people

In popular culture

East Haddam has been used as a filming location for many different films and TV shows including:

East Haddam's "Devil's Hop Yard" is referred to in H. P. Lovecraft's The Dunwich Horror.

Lake Hayward

Lake Hayward is a small private lake community within East Haddam that is home to around 120 families, most living at the lake only during summer months. The community hosts several events for residents, including game nights, bingo, child activities, and live music.

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "History of East Haddam". easthaddam.org.
  3. ^ "Historic Buildings of Connecticut » East Haddam". Historicbuildingsct.com. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  4. ^ "History". Easthaddam.org. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  5. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on May 23, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  7. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. ^ "2017 CERT Town Profile" (PDF). easthaddam.org.
  9. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 25, 2005" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-09-23. Retrieved 2006-10-02.
  10. ^ "General Election Statements of Vote, 1922 – Current". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 24, 2020.
  11. ^ "Election Night Reporting". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 24, 2020.
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-01-06. Retrieved 2014-01-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-02-24. Retrieved 2010-05-24.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-11-19. Retrieved 2010-05-24.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-03-23. Retrieved 2010-05-24.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ "Venture Smith Day honors freed slave, longtime CT resident". The Middletown Press. 2019-08-29. Retrieved 2021-05-16.
  17. ^ "Attractions". Easthaddam.org. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  18. ^ Connecticut, Massachusetts & Rhode Island Tourbook 2007 Edition. (2007) p 42. AAA Publishing, Heathrow, Florida
  19. ^ "First Church of Christ 1794". firstchurcheh.org/about-us/1794-meetinghouse/.
  20. ^ "Tracking the Truth of the Underground Railroad - Hartford Courant". Courant.com. 2002-09-29. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  21. ^ "St. Stephen's Bell". ststeves.org/learn/the-legend-of-our-bell/.
Looking north from the Nathan Hale Schoolhouse, 1919
Looking north from the Nathan Hale Schoolhouse, 1919