Edmonton Metropolitan Region
Downtown Edmonton skyline
Member municipalities of the Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board
Member municipalities of the Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board
Location of the region in Alberta
Location of the region in Alberta
Coordinates: 53°34′N 113°31′W / 53.567°N 113.517°W / 53.567; -113.517
ProvinceAlberta
CountryCanada
Area
 (2021) [1]
 • CMA9,416.19 km2 (3,635.61 sq mi)
Population
 (2021)[1]
 • CMA
1,418,118
 • CMA density150.6/km2 (390/sq mi)
GDP
 • CMACA$87.5 billion (2020)[2]
Time zoneUTC-7 (MST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-6 (MDT)
Forward sortation areas
Area code(s)780, 587, 825
Highways2, 2A, 14, 15, 16, 16A, 19, 21, 28, 28A, 37, 39, 43, 44, 60, 100, 216
Websiteemrb.ca

The Edmonton Metropolitan Region (EMR), also commonly referred to as Greater Edmonton or Metro Edmonton, is a conglomeration of municipalities centred on Edmonton, the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta.

While the EMR is not a strictly defined entity, its commonly known boundaries are coincident with those of the Edmonton census metropolitan area (CMA) as delineated by Statistics Canada. However, the Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board (EMRB) – established by the provincial government to provide a form of regional government, fostering cooperation for regional planning amongst the City of Edmonton and its surrounding municipalities – has a membership that differs slightly from the CMA.

The EMR is considered a major gateway to northern Alberta and the Canadian North, particularly for many companies, including airlines and oil/natural gas exploration. Located within central Alberta and at the northern end of the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor, the EMR is both the northernmost metropolitan area in Canada and the northernmost metropolitan area in North America with a population of over one million.

Edmonton CMA

As of the 2021 Canadian census, the Edmonton CMA includes the following 34 census subdivisions (municipalities or municipality equivalents):[3]

The Edmonton CMA is the largest of the 41 CMAs[a] in Canada by area, at 9,416.19 km2 (3,635.61 sq mi).[5] In the 2021 Canadian census, it had a population of 1,418,118, making it the sixth largest CMA in Canada by population, with the second largest percentage increase in national CMA population (37.0% versus 37.3% for the Calgary CMA) over the 15 years since the 2006 Canadian census.[6] The Edmonton CMA comprises the majority of Statistics Canada's Division No. 11 in Alberta.

Demographics

Main article: Demographics of Edmonton

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Edmonton metropolitan region recorded a population of 1,418,118 living in 548,624 of its 589,554 total private dwellings, a change of 7.3% from its 2016 population of 1,321,441. With a land area of 9,416.19 km2 (3,635.61 sq mi), it had a population density of 150.6/km2 (390.1/sq mi) in 2021.[1]

Ethnicity

Panethnic groups in Metro Edmonton (2001−2021)
Panethnic group 2021[7][8] 2016[9] 2011[10] 2006[11] 2001[12]
Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. % Pop. %
European[b] 849,515 60.78% 857,085 66.07% 822,830 72.2% 797,420 77.81% 750,315 80.94%
South Asian 123,340 8.82% 91,420 7.05% 61,135 5.36% 40,205 3.92% 29,065 3.14%
Southeast Asian[c] 101,410 7.26% 78,310 6.04% 56,240 4.94% 30,655 2.99% 23,865 2.57%
Indigenous 87,600 6.27% 76,205 5.87% 61,765 5.42% 52,105 5.08% 40,930 4.42%
African 80,575 5.76% 57,820 4.46% 32,725 2.87% 20,380 1.99% 14,095 1.52%
East Asian[d] 74,140 5.3% 70,255 5.42% 59,140 5.19% 53,235 5.19% 45,965 4.96%
Middle Eastern[e] 39,955 2.86% 32,255 2.49% 21,590 1.89% 14,865 1.45% 10,840 1.17%
Latin American 21,955 1.57% 18,755 1.45% 14,530 1.28% 9,210 0.9% 7,515 0.81%
Other/Multiracial[f] 20,200 1.45% 15,170 1.17% 9,640 0.85% 6,750 0.66% 4,430 0.48%
Total responses 1,397,750 98.56% 1,297,280 98.17% 1,139,585 98.25% 1,024,820 99.02% 927,020 98.85%
Total population 1,418,118 100% 1,321,426 100% 1,159,869 100% 1,034,945 100% 937,845 100%
Note: Totals greater than 100% due to multiple origin responses

Language

The question on knowledge of languages allows for multiple responses. The following figures are from the 2021 Canadian Census, and lists languages that were selected by at least 1,000 respondents.

Knowledge of Languages in Metro Edmonton
Language 2021[13]
Pop. %
English 1,372,110 98.17%
French 96,620 6.91%
Cree 3,915 0.28%
Oromo 2,615 0.19%
Somali 10,555 0.76%
Amharic 5,965 0.43%
Arabic 34,760 2.49%
Hebrew 1,360 0.1%
Tigrigna 6,440 0.46%
Khmer
(Cambodian)
1,055 0.08%
Vietnamese 12,490 0.89%
Bisaya,
n.o.s.
1,055 0.08%
Cebuano 3,190 0.23%
Hiligaynon 1,510 0.11%
Ilocano 4,760 0.34%
Tagalog 63,930 4.57%
Malayalam 6,485 0.46%
Tamil 4,870 0.35%
Telugu 2,140 0.15%
Czech 1,035 0.07%
Polish 10,715 0.77%
Russian 10,420 0.75%
Serbo-Croatian 5,845 0.42%
Ukrainian 12,680 0.91%
German 18,685 1.34%
Afrikaans 1,360 0.1%
Dutch 4,380 0.31%
Greek 1,545 0.11%
Bengali 3,865 0.28%
Gujarati 10,620 0.76%
Hindi 41,900 3%
Kacchi 1,110 0.08%
Marathi 1,470 0.11%
Nepali 2,500 0.18%
Punjabi 53,280 3.81%
Sinhala 2,105 0.15%
Urdu 16,575 1.19%
Pashto 1,155 0.08%
Dari 2,220 0.16%
Iranian
Persian
3,740 0.27%
Italian 8,095 0.58%
Portuguese 6,500 0.47%
Romanian 2,960 0.21%
Spanish 36,115 2.58%
Japanese 3,320 0.24%
Korean 8,020 0.57%
Akan
(Twi)
1,660 0.12%
Igbo 1,295 0.09%
Kinyarwanda
(Rwanda)
1,520 0.11%
Rundi
(Kirundi)
1,060 0.08%
Shona 1,100 0.08%
Swahili 5,030 0.36%
Yoruba 3,230 0.23%
Mandarin 32,395 2.32%
Min Nan
(Chaochow, Teochow,
Fukien, Taiwanese)
1,685 0.12%
Cantonese 29,300 2.1%
Turkish 2,920 0.21%
Hungarian 1,805 0.13%
Total
Responses
1,397,750 98.56%
Total
Population
1,418,118 100%

Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board

Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board Logo

A fragmentation in regional cooperation and partnership has long played a divisive role within the EMR. Particularly, Edmonton was frustrated that its surrounding municipalities were receiving an increased tax base for major industrial development, while not contributing to Edmonton's burden to maintain and build new infrastructure within Edmonton used by the residents and businesses of the surrounding municipalities.

After pulling out of the Alberta Capital Region Alliance (ACRA), Edmonton lobbied the provincial government to establish some form of regional government that would be more effective in fostering regional cooperation between it and its surrounding municipalities. As a result, Premier Ed Stelmach announced in December 2007 that a governing board would be established for Edmonton's Capital Region.[14] Four months later, the Capital Region Board was formed on April 15, 2008 with the passing of the Capital Region Board Regulation by Order in Council 127/2008 under the authority of the Municipal Government Act.[15]

On October 26, 2017,[16] the Capital Region Board (CRB) was renamed to the Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board (EMRB).[17]

Member municipalities

The original Capital Region Board (CRB) was established with 25 participating or member municipalities,[18] differing slightly from the municipalities that Statistics Canada included in the Edmonton CMA as the CRB excluded entities which did not take active involvement in the greater regional planning activity (four Indian reserves, eight summer villages and one village) while including the non-CMA Lamont County and the Town of Lamont.[19] The number of member municipalities was reduced to 24 on September 10, 2010[20] after the Village of New Sarepta dissolved to hamlet status under the jurisdiction of Leduc County on September 1, 2010.[21] Concurrent with the CRB's name change to the EMRB in October 2017, municipal membership decreased from 24 to 13, with the two non-CMA CRB members (Lamont County and Town of Lamont) no longer included, and only those municipalities within the CMA with a population of 5,000 or more remain as members (smaller municipalities are represented by their municipal districts).[22]

More specifically, the EMRB includes:[22][23]

Edmonton Metropolitan Region Growth Plan

This section needs to be updated. The reason given is: This growth plan has since been replaced by the Edmonton Metropolitan Region Growth Plan. Please help update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (November 2017)

Under the CRB Regulation, the CRB was tasked with preparing a growth plan to cover land use, intermunicipal transit, housing, and geographic information services components.[24] In March, 2010, Growing Forward: The Capital Region Growth Plan (CRGP), consisting of individual plans for these four components and two addenda, was approved by the Government of Alberta.[25]

The CRGP includes a population and employment forecast for the Capital Region. With a base population of 1.12 million in 2009, the CRB has forecasted the population of the Capital Region to reach 1.31 million by 2019.[26] However, the 2019 population estimate was reached and exceeded by 2014.[27] The CRGP also designates priority growth areas and cluster country residential areas within the Capital Region.[28]

List of municipalities

St. Albert
Strathcona County (Sherwood Park)
Fort Saskatchewan
Morinville

The following is a list of municipalities in the Edmonton CMA, with those that are members of the EMRB indicated accordingly.

Municipality Municipal
status[29]
Federal
census
population
(2021)[30]
Latest
municipal
census
population
(2016-2017)[31]
Latest
municipal
census
year[31]
EMRB
member[22]
Alexander 134 Indian reserve 1,077 N
Beaumont City 20,888 19,236 2019 Y
Betula Beach Summer village 27 N
Bon Accord Town 1,461 N
Bruderheim Town 1,329 N
Calmar Town 2,183 N
Devon Town 6,545 Y
Edmonton City 1,010,899 972,223 2019 Y
Enoch Cree Nation 135 Indian reserve 1,825 N
Fort Saskatchewan City 27,088 26,942 2019 Y
Gibbons Town 3,218 N
Golden Days Summer village 248 N
Itaska Beach Summer village 30 N
Kapasiwin Summer village 24 N
Lakeview Summer village 29 N
Leduc City 34,094 33,032 2019 Y
Leduc County Municipal district 14,416 Y
Legal Town 1,232 N
Morinville Town 10,385 10,578 2020 Y
Parkland County Municipal district 32,205 Y
Point Alison Summer village 18 N
Redwater Town 2,115 N
Seba Beach Summer village 229 N
Spring Lake Village 711 N
Spruce Grove City 37,645 35,766 2018 Y
St. Albert City 68,232 66,082 2018 Y
Stony Plain Town 17,993 Y
Strathcona County Specialized municipality 99,225[1] Y
Sturgeon County Municipal district 20,061 Y
Sundance Beach Summer village 42 N
Thorsby Town 967 N
Wabamun 133A and 133B Indian reserve 1,001[2] N
Warburg Village 676 N
Total Edmonton CMA 1,418,118

Major industrial areas

Major industrial areas within the ECR include the northwest, southeast and Clover Bar industrial areas in Edmonton, Nisku Industrial Business Park in Leduc County, Acheson Industrial Area in Parkland County, Refinery Row in Strathcona County, and Alberta's Industrial Heartland spanning portions of Sturgeon County, Strathcona County, Lamont County and Fort Saskatchewan.

At the moment, two more major industrial areas are in the final stages of establishment. The establishment of the Horse Hills industrial area in northeast Edmonton is in the final planning stages, while Edmonton Airports is currently planning its inland port development under the Port Alberta initiative at the Edmonton International Airport within Leduc County.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ As of the 2021 Census, with the promotion of the Nanaimo, Kamloops, Chilliwack, Fredericton, Drummondville and Red Deer CAs to CMA status, Canada has 41 CMAs.[4]
  2. ^ 2001–2016: Statistic includes all persons that did not make up part of a visible minority or an indigenous identity.
    2021: Statistic includes all persons belonging to the non-indigenous and non-visible minority “White” population group.
  3. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "Filipino" and "Southeast Asian" under visible minority section on census.
  4. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "Chinese", "Korean", and "Japanese" under visible minority section on census.
  5. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "West Asian" and "Arab" under visible minority section on census.
  6. ^ Statistic includes total responses of "Visible minority, n.i.e." and "Multiple visible minorities" under visible minority section on census.

References

  1. ^ a b c Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (February 9, 2022). Census Profile, 2021 Census of Population. www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved August 11, 2023
  2. ^ "Statistics Canada. Table 36-10-0468-01 Gross domestic product (GDP) at basic prices, by census metropolitan area (CMA) (x 1,000,000)". Statistics Canada.
  3. ^ "Focus on Geography Series, 2021 Census of Population | Edmonton, Census metropolitan area". Statistics Canada. 2022-12-16. Archived from the original on 2022-12-21. Retrieved 2023-07-04.
  4. ^ "Dictionary, Census of Population, 2021 | Changes to the name and number of CMAs and CAs for the 2021 Census". Statistics Canada. 2021-11-17. Archived from the original on 2023-04-03. Retrieved 2023-07-04.
  5. ^ "Table 98-10-0003-01 Population and dwelling counts: Census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and census subdivisions (municipalities)". 2022-02-09. Archived from the original on 2022-02-09. Retrieved 2023-07-04.
  6. ^ "Population change (in percentage), census metropolitan areas, 2006 to 2011, 2011 to 2016 and 2016 to 2021". Statistics Canada. 2022-12-16. Archived from the original on 2023-07-05. Retrieved 2023-07-04.
  7. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2022-09-21). "Indigenous identity by Registered or Treaty Indian status: Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations with parts". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-28.
  8. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2022-10-26). "Visible minority and population group by generation status: Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations with parts". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-28.
  9. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2021-10-27). "Census Profile, 2016 Census Edmonton [Census metropolitan area], Alberta and Alberta [Province]". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-28.
  10. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2015-11-27). "NHS Profile, Edmonton, CMA, Alberta, 2011". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-28.
  11. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2019-08-20). "2006 Community Profiles Edmonton Alberta (Census metropolitan area)". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-28.
  12. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2019-07-02). "2001 Community Profiles Edmonton Alberta (Census Metropolitan Area)". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-28.
  13. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (2022-08-17). "Knowledge of languages by age and gender: Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations with parts". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2022-10-04.
  14. ^ Archie McLean & Susan Ruttan (2007-12-19). "Mayor "elated" by new regional planning board". Edmonton Journal. Archived from the original on 2012-11-03. Retrieved 2008-01-09.
  15. ^ "Order in Council 127/2008". Alberta Queen's Printer. April 15, 2008. Archived from the original on July 16, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2009.
  16. ^ "Order in Council 355/2017". Alberta Queen's Printer. October 26, 2017. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  17. ^ Simons, Paula (November 1, 2017). "Welcome, neighbours, to the Edmonton Metropolitan Region". Edmonton Journal. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  18. ^ "Order in Council (O.C.) 66/2010". Province of Alberta. 2010-03-15. Archived from the original on 2012-04-04. Retrieved 2012-02-13.
  19. ^ "Fact Sheet: Geographic Profile" (PDF). Capital Region Board. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-03-25. Retrieved 2012-02-13.
  20. ^ "Order in Council (O.C.) 316/2010". Province of Alberta. 2010-03-15. Archived from the original on 2012-04-04. Retrieved 2012-02-13.
  21. ^ "Order in Council (O.C.) 230/2010". Alberta Queen's Printer. Archived from the original on 2011-07-16. Retrieved 2010-07-15.
  22. ^ a b c "New faces for a newly revitalized region". Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board. October 28, 2017. Archived from the original on November 14, 2017. Retrieved November 13, 2017.
  23. ^ Edmonton Metropolitan Region Geographic Information Services (2018-03-26). "Map of EMRB Members". Edmonton Metropolitan Region Board. Archived from the original on 2022-09-26. Retrieved 2023-07-04.
  24. ^ "Capital Region Board". Capital Region Board. Archived from the original on 2012-01-03. Retrieved 2012-01-21.
  25. ^ "Capital Region Growth Plan: Growing Forward". Capital Region Board. Archived from the original on 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2012-01-21.
  26. ^ "The Capital Region Growth Plan Addendum" (PDF). Capital Region Board. December 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-03-25. Retrieved 2012-01-21.
  27. ^ "Population of census metropolitan areas". Statcan.gc.ca. 2017-03-08. Archived from the original on 2016-12-16. Retrieved 2017-04-30.
  28. ^ "The Capital Region Growth Plan Addendum" (PDF). Capital Region Board. October 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-03-25. Retrieved 2012-01-21.
  29. ^ "2024 Municipal Codes" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. June 3, 2024. Retrieved June 14, 2024.
  30. ^ a b Focus on Geography Series, 2021 Census of Population Edmonton, Census metropolitan area. Statistics Canada Retrieved August 12, 2023
  31. ^ a b 2019 Municipal Affairs Population List (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. ISBN 978-1-4601-4623-1. Retrieved January 16, 2021.
  32. ^ Census population results. Strathcona County. September 13, 2022. Retrieved August 12, 2023