Egg Bowl
SportFootball
First meetingOctober 28, 1901
Mississippi A&M, 17–0
Latest meetingNovember 25, 2021
Ole Miss, 31–21
Next meetingNovember 24, 2022 in Oxford, MS
TrophyGolden Egg
Statistics
Meetings total118
All-time seriesOle Miss leads 64–45–6[1]
Largest victoryMississippi State, 65–0 (1915)
Longest win streakMississippi State, 13 (1911–1925)
Current win streakOle Miss, 2 (2020–present)
Locations of Mississippi State and Ole Miss

The Egg Bowl, (traditionally named “Battle for the Golden Egg”) is the name given to the Mississippi State–Ole Miss football rivalry.[2] It is an American college football rivalry game played annually between Southeastern Conference members Mississippi State University and Ole Miss (The University of Mississippi).[2][3]

The teams first played each other in 1901. Since 1927 the winning squad has been awarded possession of the "Golden Egg Trophy"; after ties, the previous winner retains possession. The game has been played every year since 1944, making it the tenth longest uninterrupted series in the United States. Ole Miss leads the series 64–45–6 through the 2021 season.[4]

The game is a typical example of the intrastate sports rivalries between public universities. These games are usually between one bearing the state's name alone, and the land-grant university, often styled as "State University." Like most such rivalries, it is contested at the end of the regular season, in this case during the Thanksgiving weekend. The Egg Bowl has been played on Thanksgiving 23 times, including from 1998 to 2003, in 2013, and from 2017 to 2021.[5]

Series history

The first game in the series was played on October 28, 1901, at Mississippi State. Mississippi State, then known as the Mississippi A&M College and nicknamed the Aggies, defeated Ole Miss, nicknamed the Red and Blue at that time,[6] by a final score of 17–0. The two squads met on the gridiron every year from 1901 until 1911 and then, after a three-year hiatus, resumed the series in 1915; since that 1915 meeting the two teams have met on the field every season with the exception of the 1943 season, when neither school fielded teams due to World War II.[7][8][9]

From 1973 through 1990, the game was played at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium in Jackson, which seats about 62,000. The stadium was centrally located in the state and the state's only venue capable of seating the anticipated crowd; for many years Vaught–Hemingway Stadium in Oxford seated only about 32,000 and Scott Field in Starkville seated only about 31,000. Both campus venues have been considerably expanded and are now capable of accommodating the expected crowds, and both have been continually upgraded to the point where they are superior in amenities to Veterans Memorial Stadium.

At one point the level of intensity was such that a victory by one of the schools in this game could salvage what had otherwise been a poor season. This dynamic has proven not to be applicable every year, however; in 2004 Ole Miss won the game but fired its coach, David Cutcliffe, the next year following a disappointing season. Mississippi State dominated the first part of the series with a 17-5-1 record against Ole Miss. However, Ole Miss now leads the series, due largely to its performance in the rivalry under Johnny Vaught. Vaught went 19–2–4 against the Mississippi State during his two separate tenures at Ole Miss. The series has favored Mississippi State most recently; as of the 2019 season, when removing the wins that Ole Miss vacated from 2012 and 2014 due to NCAA violations, the past ten games have included only two victories for Ole Miss and six for Mississippi State.

The birth of the Golden Egg

The Aggies (Bulldogs) dominated the early days of the series including a 13-game A&M winning streak from 1911–1925 during which time the Aggies outscored the Red and Blue by a combined 327–33.[10] Through 1925 Ole Miss had won only five times out of 23 total contests. In 1926 when the Red and Blue ended their 13-game losing streak by defeating A&M 7–6 in Starkville, the Ole Miss fans rushed the field with some trying to tear the goalposts down. A&M fans did not take well to the Ole Miss fans destroying their property and fights broke out. Some A&M fans defended the goal posts with wooden chairs, and several injuries were reported. According to one account:

"Irate Aggie supporters took after the ambitious Ole Miss group with cane bottom chairs, and fights broke out. The mayhem continued until most of the chairs were splintered."[11]

To prevent such events in the future, students of the two schools created the "Golden Egg," a large trophy which has been awarded to the winning team each year since 1927. The trophy is a large football-shaped brass piece mounted to a wooden base and traditionally symbolizes supremacy in college football in the state of Mississippi for the year. The footballs used in American football in the 1920s were considerably more ovoid and blunter than those in use today and similar to the balls still used in rugby; the trophy thus, to modern eyes, more resembles an egg than a football. The awarding of the "Golden Egg" was instituted in 1927 by joint agreement between the two schools' student bodies. In the event of a tie (before overtime was instituted in Division I college football in 1996)[12] the school that won the game the previous year kept the trophy for the first half of the new year and then the trophy was sent to the other school for the second half of the new year.[13] The game was given the nickname "Egg Bowl" by The Clarion-Ledger sportswriter Tom Patterson in 1979.[14]

Notable games

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1929 Ole Miss vs. Mississippi A&M football program. The game ended tied 7–7. Note on the cover the game was referred to as "Mississippi's Football Classic" and not the "Egg Bowl", a moniker that would not be applied to the game until the 1979 contest by sportswriter  Tom Patterson.
1929 Ole Miss vs. Mississippi A&M football program. The game ended tied 7–7. Note on the cover the game was referred to as "Mississippi's Football Classic" and not the "Egg Bowl", a moniker that would not be applied to the game until the 1979 contest by sportswriter Tom Patterson.
Ole Miss and Mississippi State meet in the 1975 Battle for the Golden Egg.
Ole Miss and Mississippi State meet in the 1975 Battle for the Golden Egg.

Game results

Mississippi State victoriesOle Miss victoriesTie gamesForfeits / Vacated wins[n 1][n 2][n 3]
No.DateLocationWinnerScore
1 October 28, 1901 Starkville Mississippi A&M 17–0
2 October 25, 1902 Starkville Ole Miss 21–0
3 November 14, 1903 Oxford Tie6–6
4 October 22, 1904 Columbus Ole Miss 17–5
5 November 30, 1905 Jackson Mississippi A&M 11–0
6 November 29, 1906 Jackson Ole Miss 29–5
7 November 28, 1907 Jackson Mississippi A&M 15–0
8 November 26, 1908 Jackson Mississippi A&M 44–6
9 November 25, 1909 Jackson Ole Miss 9–5
10 November 24, 1910 Jackson Ole Miss 30–0
11 November 30, 1911 Jackson Mississippi A&M 6–0
12 November 6, 1915 Tupelo Mississippi A&M 65–0
13 November 3, 1916 Tupelo Mississippi A&M 36–0
14 November 3, 1917 Tupelo Mississippi A&M 41–14
15 November 28, 1918 Starkville Mississippi A&M 34–0
16 December 7, 1918 Oxford Mississippi A&M 13–0
17 November 8, 1919 Clarksdale Mississippi A&M 33–0
18 November 6, 1920 Greenwood Mississippi A&M 20–0
19 October 29, 1921 Greenwood Mississippi A&M 21–0
20 October 21, 1922 Jackson Mississippi A&M 19–13
21 October 20, 1923 Jackson Mississippi A&M 13–6
22 October 18, 1924 Jackson Mississippi A&M 20–0
23 October 24, 1925 Jackson Mississippi A&M 6–0
24 November 25, 1926 Starkville Ole Miss 7–6
25 November 24, 1927 Oxford Ole Miss 20–12
26 November 29, 1928 Starkville Ole Miss 20–19
27 November 28, 1929 Oxford Tie7–7
28 November 27, 1930 Starkville Ole Miss 20–0
29 November 26, 1931 Oxford Ole Miss 25–14
30 November 24, 1932 Starkville Ole Miss 13–0
31 December 2, 1933 Oxford Ole Miss 31–0
32 December 1, 1934 Starkville Ole Miss 7–3
33 November 30, 1935 Oxford Ole Miss 14–6
34 November 21, 1936 Starkville Mississippi State 26–6
35 November 25, 1937 Oxford Mississippi State 9–7
36 November 26, 1938 Starkville Ole Miss 19–6
37 November 25, 1939 Oxford Mississippi State 18–6
38 November 23, 1940 Starkville #16 Mississippi State 19–0
39 November 29, 1941 Oxford Mississippi State 6–0
40 November 28, 1942 Starkville #16 Mississippi State 34–12
41 November 25, 1944 Oxford Ole Miss 13–8
42 November 24, 1945 Starkville Ole Miss 7–6
43 November 23, 1946 Oxford Mississippi State 20–0
44 November 29, 1947 Starkville #15 Ole Miss 33–14
45 November 27, 1948 Oxford #17 Ole Miss 34–7
46 November 26, 1949 Starkville Ole Miss 26–0
47 December 2, 1950 Oxford Ole Miss 27–20
48 December 1, 1951 Starkville Ole Miss 49–7
49 November 29, 1952 Oxford #6 Ole Miss 20–14
50 November 28, 1953 Starkville Tie7–7
51 November 27, 1954 Oxford #6 Ole Miss 14–0
52 November 26, 1955 Starkville #14 Ole Miss 26–0
53 December 1, 1956 Oxford Ole Miss 13–7
54 November 30, 1957 Starkville Tie7–7
55 November 29, 1958 Oxford #13 Ole Miss 21–0
56 November 28, 1959 Starkville #2 Ole Miss 42–0
57 November 26, 1960 Oxford #3 Ole Miss 35–9
58 December 2, 1961 Starkville #5 Ole Miss 37–7
59 December 1, 1962 Oxford #3 Ole Miss 13–6
60 November 30, 1963 Starkville Tie10–10
No.DateLocationWinnerScore
61 December 5, 1964 Oxford Mississippi State 20–17
62 November 27, 1965 Starkville Ole Miss 21–0
63 November 26, 1966 Oxford Ole Miss 24–0
64 December 2, 1967 Starkville Ole Miss 10–3
65 November 30, 1968 Oxford Tie17–17
66 November 27, 1969 Starkville #14 Ole Miss 48–22
67 November 26, 1970 Oxford Mississippi State 19–14
68 November 25, 1971 Starkville #18 Ole Miss 48–0
69 November 25, 1972 Oxford Ole Miss 51–14
70 November 24, 1973 Jackson Ole Miss 38–10
71 November 23, 1974 Jackson Mississippi State 31–13
72 November 22, 1975 Jackson Ole Miss 13–7
73 November 20, 1976 Jackson Mississippi State† 28–11
74 November 19, 1977 Jackson Mississippi State† 18–14
75 November 25, 1978 Jackson Ole Miss 27–7
76 November 24, 1979 Jackson Ole Miss 14–9
77 November 22, 1980 Jackson #17 Mississippi State 19–14
78 November 21, 1981 Jackson Ole Miss 21–17
79 November 20, 1982 Jackson Mississippi State 27–10
80 November 19, 1983 Jackson Ole Miss 24–23
81 November 24, 1984 Jackson Ole Miss 24–3
82 November 23, 1985 Jackson Ole Miss 45–27
83 November 22, 1986 Jackson Ole Miss 24–3
84 November 21, 1987 Jackson Mississippi State 30–20
85 November 26, 1988 Jackson Ole Miss 33–6
86 November 25, 1989 Jackson Ole Miss 21–11
87 November 24, 1990 Jackson #21 Ole Miss 21–9
88 November 23, 1991 Starkville Mississippi State 24–9
89 November 28, 1992 Oxford #24 Ole Miss 17–10
90 November 27, 1993 Starkville Mississippi State 20–13
91 November 26, 1994 Oxford #19 Mississippi State 21–17
92 November 25, 1995 Starkville Ole Miss 13–10
93 November 30, 1996 Oxford Mississippi State 17–0
94 November 29, 1997 Starkville Ole Miss 15–14
95 November 26, 1998 Oxford #25 Mississippi State 28–6
96 November 25, 1999 Starkville #18 Mississippi State 23–20
97 November 23, 2000 Oxford Ole Miss 45–30
98 November 22, 2001 Starkville Mississippi State 36–28
99 November 28, 2002 Oxford Ole Miss 24–12
100 November 27, 2003 Starkville #17 Ole Miss 31–0
101 November 27, 2004 Oxford Ole Miss 20–3
102 November 26, 2005 Starkville Mississippi State 35–14
103 November 25, 2006 Oxford Ole Miss 20–17
104 November 23, 2007 Starkville Mississippi State 17–14
105 November 28, 2008 Oxford #25 Ole Miss 45–0
106 November 28, 2009 Starkville Mississippi State 41–27
107 November 27, 2010 Oxford #25 Mississippi State 31–23
108 November 26, 2011 Starkville Mississippi State 31–3
109 November 24, 2012 Oxford Ole Miss‡ 41–24
110 November 28, 2013 Starkville Mississippi State 17–10OT
111 November 29, 2014 Oxford #18 Ole Miss‡ 31–17
112 November 28, 2015 Starkville #19 Ole Miss 38–27
113 November 26, 2016 Oxford Mississippi State 55–20
114 November 23, 2017 Starkville Ole Miss 31–28
115 November 22, 2018 Oxford #22 Mississippi State^ 35–3
116 November 28, 2019 Starkville Mississippi State 21–20
117 November 28, 2020 Oxford Ole Miss 31–24
118 November 25, 2021 Starkville #9 Ole Miss 31–21
Series: Ole Miss leads 64–45–6[1]
† Mississippi State forfeit[41]
‡ Ole Miss vacated[41]
^ Mississippi State vacated[42]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Mississippi State forfeited the 1976 and 1977 games.[41]
  2. ^ Ole Miss vacated the 2012 and 2014 games.[41]
  3. ^ Mississippi State vacated the 2018 game due academic misconduct involving 10 football players, a former part-time tutor, and an online chemistry class.[42]

References

  1. ^ a b "Winsipedia - Ole Miss Rebels vs. Mississippi State Bulldogs football series history". Winsipedia.
  2. ^ a b "Why is Ole Miss–Mississippi State called the Egg Bowl?". SI.com.
  3. ^ http://www.olemisssports.com/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/rebels-golden-egg.html
  4. ^ "Winsipedia - Mississippi State Bulldogs vs. Ole Miss Rebels football series history". Winsipedia.
  5. ^ "Egg Bowl moved back to Thanksgiving night". ESPN.com. April 10, 2013.
  6. ^ Eagles, Charles W. (November 15, 2009). The Price of Defiance: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss. Univ of North Carolina Press. ISBN 9780807895597 – via Internet Archive.
  7. ^ "Mississippi Yearly Results 1940–1944". Archived from the original on January 8, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  8. ^ "Mississippi State Yearly Results 1940–1944". Archived from the original on January 8, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  9. ^ Scott, Richard (September 15, 2008). SEC Football: 75 Years of Pride and Passion. MBI Publishing Company. ISBN 9781616731335 – via Google Books.
  10. ^ "College football's great rivalries: Ole Miss vs. Mississippi State". AthlonSports.com.
  11. ^ "Crack the Egg: Ole Miss-Mississippi State Rivalry Fights On". October 2, 2013.
  12. ^ "College Football Poll.com". www.collegefootballpoll.com. Archived from the original on January 8, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  13. ^ "Ole Miss football 2007 Media guide".
  14. ^ "Tom Patterson: He Named the Egg Bowl". June 14, 2012.
  15. ^ a b Barner, William G.; McKenzie, Danny (November 24, 2017). The Egg Bowl: Mississippi State vs. Ole Miss, Second Edition. University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 9781604738322. JSTOR j.ctt2tvc4x.
  16. ^ a b c d Berner, William G.; McKenzie, Danny (2010). The Egg Bowl: Mississippi State Vs. Ole Miss. Oxford, MS: Univ. Press of Mississippi. pp. 26–27. ISBN 9781604738322. Retrieved October 16, 2011.
  17. ^ a b Nash, Bruce; Zullo, Allan (1991). Football Hall of Shame. New York City: Simon and Schuster. p. 42. ISBN 9780671745516. Retrieved October 16, 2011.
  18. ^ Conner, Floyd (2000). Football's Most Wanted. Potomac Books, Inc. ISBN 9781574883091.
  19. ^ "2013 Mississippi State Football Notes • Game 12 • Ole Miss • Battle For The Golden Egg" (PDF).
  20. ^ "Coaching Records Game by Game". www.cfbdatawarehouse.com.
  21. ^ "Egg Bowl History: "Golden Egg" added in 1927". For Whom the Cowbell Tolls. November 27, 2013.
  22. ^ William G. Barner (2010). The Egg Bowl: Mississippi State Vs. Ole Miss. p. 76. ISBN 9781617030741.
  23. ^ craigclarke (July 27, 2006). "Fight between Ole Miss and Mississippi State" – via YouTube.
  24. ^ "FRIDAY FLASHBACK: 1997 Egg Bowl".
  25. ^ "Hijab Syari - MSSORTSMAGAZINE - Majalah Wanita Muslimah Indonesia". Archived from the original on May 29, 2014. Retrieved May 29, 2014.
  26. ^ "SDN Bulldog Blog – Gameday 2010 Week 13: Egg Bowl style vs. Ole Miss – Can State keep the trophy?".
  27. ^ "Mississippi State vs. Ole Miss - Game Recap - November 28, 2008 - ESPN". ESPN.com.
  28. ^ "Croom resigns as head coach of Mississippi State". ESPN.com. November 29, 2008.
  29. ^ Vint, Patrick (November 28, 2013). "Mississippi State takes Egg Bowl in overtime". SBNation.com.
  30. ^ Low, Chris (November 26, 2014). "If Mississippi State wins Egg Bowl, it should be playoff bound". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 30, 2014.
  31. ^ "All eyes are on the Egg Bowl". Sun-Herald. Archived from the original on December 4, 2014. Retrieved November 30, 2014.
  32. ^ "State of Mississippi's spotlight not leaving after Ole Miss' Egg Bowl win". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved November 30, 2014.
  33. ^ "No. 19 Ole Miss topples No. 4 Mississippi State in Egg Bowl". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 30, 2014.
  34. ^ "How ESPN landed the Iron Bowl, plus more Media Circus". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved November 27, 2014.
  35. ^ "Mississippi St beats Mississippi 55-20 in Egg Bowl". USA Today.
  36. ^ "Ole Miss wins a "Bowl" after all!". SBNation.com. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  37. ^ D'Andrea, Christian (November 23, 2017). "Ole Miss wins a "Bowl" after all!". SBNation.com.
  38. ^ Lohmar, Jim (November 26, 2017). "The oral history of D.K. Metcalf peeing on Mississippi State". Red Cup Rebellion.
  39. ^ West, Jenna. "Ole Miss Apologizes for 'Unacceptable' Celebration". Sports Illustrated.
  40. ^ "Ole Miss fires Luke, who was 15-21 in 3 seasons". ESPN.com. December 2, 2019.
  41. ^ a b c d "Forfeits and Vacated Games". College Football at Sports-Reference.com.
  42. ^ a b Journal, Logan Lowery Daily. "MSU fires Moorhead after two seasons". Daily Journal. All eight of Moorhead's victories in 2018 had to be vacated after 10 football players were reprimanded by the NCAA for academic misconduct involving a former part-time tutor and an online chemistry class.