Emery J. San Souci
53rd Governor of Rhode Island
In office
January 4, 1921 – January 2, 1923
LieutenantHarold Gross
Preceded byRobert Livingston Beeckman
Succeeded byWilliam S. Flynn
Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island
In office
January 4, 1915 – January 4, 1921
GovernorRobert Livingston Beeckman
Preceded byRosewell Burchard
Succeeded byHarold Gross
Personal details
Born(1857-07-24)July 24, 1857
Saco, Maine, U.S.
DiedAugust 10, 1936(1936-08-10) (aged 79)
Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.
Resting placeMount Saint Benedict Cemetery
Bloomfield, Connecticut
NationalityAmerican
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Minnie A.J. Duffy
ChildrenEuphemia Maybelle San Souci
Mary Louisa San Souci
ParentsEuzebe San Souci
Marie Louise (Couett) San Souci
ResidenceProvidence, Rhode Island
ProfessionMerchant
Politician

Emery John San Souci (July 24, 1857 – August 10, 1936) was an American merchant and politician from Rhode Island. He served as Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island and as the 53rd Governor of Rhode Island.

Early life and career

San Souci was born in Saco, Maine,[1] the son of Euzebe San Souci and Marie Louise (Couett) San Souci.[2] As a small child he moved with his family in 1860 to St. Albans, Vermont. His father was a member of the Army of the Potomac and was killed in battle in 1864.[3] San Succi attended school in St. Albans until he was eleven.[4] He left school to work so he could help his mother raise the family.[5]

He worked as a clerk in Biddeford, Maine before working as a shoe clerk in Greenfield, Massachusetts and Providence, Rhode Island. In 1877, he moved to Hartford, Connecticut to work for a shoe making company. He worked for that company until 1890 when he opened a shoe and clothing store business with his brothers in Providence.[6] The company became very successful, and he served as secretary and treasurer of the company.[7]

Political career

San Souci held many political positions in Providence, and served on the Providence City Council from 1900 to 1907.[8] In 1908 he was appointed aide-de-camp to Governor Pothier, and served in that position for six years.[9] He was elected as a Republican Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island in 1914, and was reelected in 1916. He served as lieutenant governor from 1915 to 1921.[10]

In 1921 he was elected Governor of Rhode Island,[11] in large part due to the strong support of women voters. 1921 was the first year women were allowed to vote in state elections in Rhode Island.[12] He served as governor from January 4, 1921, to January 2, 1923, and did not win the nomination for governor in 1922 in large part to his handling of a large textile strike. He called in the state militia to handle the strike, and he lost the support of many in his party.[13]

In 1923 President Harding appointed him Collector of the Port of Providence.[14] He won reappointment under Presidents Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and held the position until his retirement in 1935. He also served as director of the Union Trust Company of Providence[15] and as director of St. Vincent de Paul Infant Asylum.[16]

San Souci died at his home in Providence on August 10, 1936. He is interred at Mount Saint Benedict Cemetery in Bloomfield, Connecticut.[17]

Family life

San Souci and his wife Minnie A. Duffy had two daughters, Mary Louisa San Souci and Euphemia Maybelle San Souci.[18]

References

  1. ^ McLoughlin, William (1986). Rhode Island: A History (States and the Nation). W. W. Norton & Company. p. 184. ISBN 9780393302714.
  2. ^ "Emery John San Souci". Ancestry.com. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  3. ^ "RIGENWEB-L Archives". Ancestry.com. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  4. ^ Capace, Nancy (2001). The Encyclopedia of Rhode Island. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 206. ISBN 9780403096107.
  5. ^ "Clippings on 14 August 1936". Newport Mercury. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  6. ^ McGowan, Louis H. and Daniel Brown (2006). Providence. Arcadia Publishing. p. 116. ISBN 9780738544625.
  7. ^ "History of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical". Ancestry.com. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  8. ^ Providence (R.I.) City Council (1915). Providence City Manual: Or, Organization of the Municipal Government. Providence (R.I.) City Council. p. 299.
  9. ^ McLoughlin, William (1986). Rhode Island: A History (States and the Nation). W. W. Norton & Company. p. 184. ISBN 9780393302714.
  10. ^ "San Souci, Emery J." Our Campaigns. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  11. ^ McLoughlin, William (1986). Rhode Island: A History (States and the Nation). W. W. Norton & Company. p. 184. ISBN 9780393302714.
  12. ^ Capace, Nancy (2001). The Encyclopedia of Rhode Island. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 206. ISBN 9780403096107.
  13. ^ Frias, Steven (2011). Cranston and Its Mayors: A History. The History Press. p. 32. ISBN 9781609493226.
  14. ^ Capace, Nancy (2001). The Encyclopedia of Rhode Island. North American Book Dist LLC. p. 206. ISBN 9780403096107.
  15. ^ Annual Report Showing the Condition of State Banks, Savings Banks, Trust Companies and Loan and Investment Companies Volume 14 (1921). Rhode Island. Banking Bureau. Rhode Island. Banking Bureau. p. 143.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  16. ^ "RIGENWEB-L Archives". Ancestry.com. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  17. ^ "Clippings on 14 August 1936". Newport Mercury. Retrieved May 1, 2014.
  18. ^ "Emery John San Souci". Ancestry.com. Retrieved May 1, 2014.


Party political offices Preceded byRobert Livingston Beeckman Republican nominee for Governor of Rhode Island1920 Succeeded byHarold J. Gross Political offices Preceded byRosewell Burchard Lieutenant Governor of Rhode Island1915–1920 Succeeded byHarold Gross Preceded byR. Livingston Beeckman Governor of Rhode Island1921–1923 Succeeded byWilliam S. Flynn