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An employment counsellor advises, coaches, provides information to, and supports people who are planning, seeking and managing their career and life/work direction. Traditionally, employment counselors help their clients deal with vocational decisions concerning choice, changes in, or adjustment to work.[1]

Terminology

Employment counsellor may also be spelled "employment counselor". The job is also known as a workforce development professional.

Duties

Employment Counseling is generally considered to be a specialty under the larger umbrella of Career Counseling. Employment and Workforce Development Professionals help clients of many age categories to:

Working with clients individually or in groups, career development professionals may:

Working conditions

Employment Counselors generally focus on the acquisition of work, actually getting a job, which is the desired result of the career development, training and education process. They work in government offices (One Stop Career Centers), community based organizations, for profit and non profit businesses that are engaged in helping people find jobs. Salary and Working Conditions are quite diverse. [2] Employment Counseling has its historical roots with the US Department of Labor. Career development professionals may work in a variety of settings but usually work in offices where they can conduct private interviews with clients and in classrooms or boardrooms where they conduct group sessions. Depending on the organization, their hours of work may include some evening and weekend work.

Personal characteristics

Career development professionals need the following characteristics:

They should enjoy consulting with people, compiling information and working with clients to develop innovative solutions to problems.

Educational requirements

Most career development professionals have post-secondary education in a related discipline such as psychology, education, social work or human resources development. Increasingly, employers are looking for applicants who have a certificate, diploma or degree in career development, or an equivalent combination of education and experience.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.co.warren.nj.us/departments/contractadmin/61.pdf A One Stop Career Center Description
  2. ^ "Employment Counselor Job Description, Career as an Employment Counselor, Salary, Employment - Definition and Nature of the Work, Education and Training Requirements, Getting the Job".