The Science and Technology Branch is service within the Federal Bureau of Investigation that comprises three separate divisions and three program offices. The goal when it was founded in July 2006 was to centralize the leadership and management of the three divisions.[1] The mission of the STB is discover, develop, and deliver innovative science and technology so that intelligence and innovative investigation is enhanced.

Leadership

The Science and Technology branch is currently overseen by Darrin E. Jones, who is the executive assistant director. Within the Science and Technology Branch there are three divisions. The first is the Criminal Justice Information Services Division, which is run by Douglas Lindquist.[2] The second division is the Laboratory Division which is overseen by G. Clayton Grigg.[3] Lastly, the Operational Technology Division is overseen by Brian K. Brooks.[4] The Science and Technology Branch also has a workforce of over 6,200 employees: Special Agents, Forensic Scientists, Intelligence Analysts, and Professional Support Personnel.[1]

History

The Science and Technology Branch was founded by former FBI Director, Robert Mueller in July 2006.[1] At that time the first executive assistant director, Kerry E. Haynes was appointed.[5] Following his leadership of two years Robert Mueller then appointed a new executive assistant director, Louis E. Grever in October 2012. Grever served for four years in this position[6] until his replacement Steven Martinez took leadership on May 9, 2012.[7] In January 2014 Robert Mueller appointed Amy Hess as the new executive assistant director in which she served until she was promoted to the position of Special Agent in Charge at the FBI Louisiana branch.[8] After her departure from the Science and Technology Branch in 2016, Robert Mueller appointed Christopher M. Piehota who is the current Science and Technology Branch Executive Assistant Director.[9]

Organization

Departments

Forensic Science

Forensic Science is a service that is run and overseen by the Science and Technology Branch, and is used by local, state, and federal authorities. Forensic science covers a wide range of subjects including:

Operational Technology

Operational Technology is a service that is run and overseen by the Science and Technology Branch, that is used for all operational aspects of FBI investigations and programs. The services that they offer include:

Information Sharing

Information Sharing is a service that is run and overseen by the Science and Technology Branch which is used nationally and sometimes internationally to aid in the investigation and capture of wanted criminals and other important missions. They provide the following services:

Services provided

Today more than 18,000 agencies such as local, state, federal, and university contribute to the UCR and allow for 4 national reports each year.[16]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Science and Technology Branch". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  2. ^ "United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary". www.judiciary.senate.gov. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  3. ^ "G. Clayton Grigg Named Assistant Director of Laboratory Division". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  4. ^ "Brian Brooks Named Assistant Director of the Operational Technology Division". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  5. ^ "FBI — FBI Director Mueller Names Kerry E. Haynes Assistant Director, …". archive.is. 2016-12-07. Archived from the original on 2016-12-07. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  6. ^ "Louis E. Grever Named Executive Assistant Director of FBI Science and Technology Branch". FBI. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  7. ^ "Steven Martinez Named Executive Assistant Director of Science and Technology Branch". FBI. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  8. ^ "Special Agent in Charge Amy Hess". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  9. ^ "FBI Appoints Christopher Piehota as Science & Tech Branch Executive Asst Director". Executive Gov. 2016-08-24. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  10. ^ "Combined DNA Index System (CODIS)". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  11. ^ "National Crime Information Center (NCIC)". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  12. ^ "Questioned Documents Experts". FBI. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  13. ^ "Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory (RCFL)". Regional Computer Forensics Laboratory. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  14. ^ "Piecing Together Digital Evidence". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  15. ^ "NIBRS". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.
  16. ^ "Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2019-05-02.