Faith Kipyegon
Kipyegon at the 2017 World Championships
Personal information
Full nameFaith Chepngetich Kipyegon
Born (1994-01-10) 10 January 1994 (age 28)
Bomet, Kenya
Home townIten, Kenya
Height1.57 m (5 ft 2 in)[1]
Weight42 kg (93 lb)
Sport
CountryKenya
SportAthletics
Event(s)1500 metres
Achievements and titles
World finals
  • 1500 m
  • 2013: 5th
  • 2015:  Silver
  • 2017:  Gold
  • 2019:  Silver
Olympic finals
  • 1500 m
  • 2012 London: 21st (h)
  • 2016 Rio de Janeiro:  Gold
  • 2020 Tokyo:  Gold
Personal best(s)

Faith Chepngetich Kipyegon (born 10 January 1994)[2] is a Kenyan middle-distance runner specializing in the 1500 metres. A 2016 Rio Olympics and 2020 Tokyo Olympics champion with the Olympic record at the latter, she has won or finished second in every major championships since she was 20 in 2014, and is regarded as the greatest female 1500 metres runner in history.[3][4] Competing at the World Championships in 2015, 2017 and 2019, Kipyegon took a silver medal, a gold and a silver respectively. In July 2021, she achieved the fourth-fastest time in history, setting her consecutive Kenyan record.[5]

In her specialist 1500 m event, Kipyegon took gold medals at the 2011 World U18 Championships, and the 2012 World U20 Championships. At the age of 18, she did not reach semifinals of the 2012 London Olympics, but won the junior races at the 2011 and 2013 World Cross Country Championships, and finished fifth at the 2013 World Championships. She was 2014 Commonwealth Games champion, and 2017 and 2021 Diamond League winner.

Kipyegon was cited as one of the Top 100 most influential Africans by New African magazine in 2017.[6]

Career

Junior career

Kipyegon at the 2012 World Junior Championships

At age 16, Faith Kipyegon ran in the 2010 World Cross Country Championships women's junior race in Bydgoszcz, Poland. She came in fourth place individually and won the gold medal with her under-20 team.[7]

She participated in the 2011 World Cross Country Championships in Punta Umbria, Spain and won the gold medal in the junior race adding silver with her team.[8] A few months afterward, she competed in the 1500 m at the World Youth Championships in Lille, France winning a gold medal ahead of two Ethiopian runners with a time of 4m 9.48s and breaking a championship record in the process.[9]

At the 2012 World Junior Championships in Barcelona, Kipyegon won a gold medal in her specialist event way ahead of the field with a time of 4:04.96; the Serbian Amela Terzić and Ethiopian Senbere Teferi took second and third place respectively. That time she also set a a championship record.[10] The 18-year-old qualified for the London Olympics, but at the event failed to advance to the semi-finals clocking 4:08.78.[11]

At the beginning of the 2013 season, she won a gold medal in the junior race both with her team at the World Cross Country Championships in Bydgoszcz, Poland.[12] On 10 May, at the Diamond League meeting in Doha, Qatar, she established in the 1500 m a Kenyan record with a time of 3:56.98, facing the Swedish runner Abeba Aregawi.[13] In August, at the World Championships in Moscow, the 19-year-old came fifth in the final in a time of 4:05.08.[14]

Senior career

2014

In May, she was a part of the team which won a gold medal in the 4×1500 m relay at the first IAAF World Relays in Nassau, Bahamas, along with Mercy Cherono, Irene Jelagat and Hellen Obiri. The Kenyan team, ahead of the United States and Australia, set a new world record time in a time of 16:33.58.[15] The same year in July, she became Commonwealth Games 1500 m champion in Glasgow, Scotland in a time of 4:08.94.[16]

2015

On 25 August 2015, Kipyegon won a silver in the 1500 m event at the World Championships in Beijing. After tactical race she finished in 4:08.96 second to Ethiopia's world record holder Genzebe Dibaba who clocked 4:08.09. Siffan Hassan representing Netherlands was third in 4:09.34.[17]

On 11 September, at the Diamond League meeting in Brussels, she won one mile with an African and a meet record of 4:16.71, beating Hassan, who finished in 4:18.20, in the final stretch.[18]

2016

On 14 May, Kipyegon improved her own 2013 1500 m Kenyan record by running 3:56.82 when wining Diamond League Shanghai Golden Grand Prix meeting. Two weeks later she bested her record with a 3:56.41 performance to place first at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon. She also won the mile event during Oslo Bislett Games meet in June.[2]

The 22-year-old became 2016 Olympics Games 1500 m gold medallist in Rio de Janeiro reversing the order from the previous year's World Championships. She outsprinted Dibaba in the final 200m in what was initially a very slow race, with a third lap in 56.80 and last 800m in the 800m races pace of 1:57.2.[19] Kipyegon clocked 4:08.92, Dibaba 4:10.27 and Jennifer Simpson was third in 4:10.53.[20][21]

2017

Kipyegon (center) at the 2017 World Championships in London
Kipyegon (center) at the 2017 World Championships in London

In 2017, she earned her first Diamond League 1500 m title, winning three races in Shanghai, Eugene, and Brussels. Her best success of this year was the first place at the London World Championships, becoming only the third woman in history to win both the Olympic and World Championships 1500 m race. She clocked 4:02.59 while three next women also recorded times below 4m 3s, with Jenny Simpson in second and Caster Semenya third .[22]

2018–2020

Kipyegon gave birth to her first child in 2018, returning 12 months later in June 2019 to win her signature event in 3:59:04 at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene.[3] She went on to win silver medal at the World Championships in Doha, where she set her new Kenyan record of 3:54.22. Sifan Hassan came first in 3:51.95 while third-placed Gudaf Tsegay set a best of 3:54.38.[23]

In 2020, she competed at the Diamond League and Continental Tour meetings staying unbeaten in all her six races. In August, she ran the second-fastest time ever, an African record and a Diamond League record in the 1000 metres at the Herculis meet in Monaco, with her result of 2:29.15 just 0.17 short of the world record.[2][24][25]

2021

In 2021, she improved her national record twice at the Diamond League meetings. On 10 June, she ran 3:53.91 at the Rome Golden Gala meet, staged exceptionally in Florence, to finish second just behind Sifan Hassan, who timed 3:53.63. On 9 July at the Monaco Herculis, Kipyegon stopped the clock at a world-leading 3m 51.07s – the fourth-fastest time in history and just one second off Genzebe Dibaba's world record – outsprinting Hassan in the home straight by about 2.5 s.[5]

At the women's 1500 m final of the delayed 2020 Tokyo Games in August, Kipyegon overtook Hassan in the last 200m to win her second consecutive Olympic gold medal in the event in a time of 3m 53.11s, breaking an Olympic record which had stood for 33 years. She also became the second woman in history to win back-to-back Olympic 1500m titles. While Hassan faded in the home stretch (3:55.86) Laura Muir set the British record of 3:54.50 to claim a silver medal.[26][27][28]

In September, she beat Hassan again at the Zürich Weltklasse Diamond League final to take her second 1500m Diamond Trophy. She won nine out of her ten races in the season.[2][4]

Achievements

All information taken from World Athletics profile.

Personal bests

Event Time Venue Date Notes
800 metres 1:57.68 Doha, Qatar 25 September 2020
1000 metres 2:29.15 Monaco, Monaco 14 August 2020 African record
1500 metres 3:51.07 Monaco, Monaco 9 July 2021 NR #4th all-time [29]
One mile 4:16.71 Brussels, Belgium 11 September 2015
3000 metres 8:23.55 Doha, Qatar 9 May 2014
5000 metres 14:31.95 Eugene, OR, United States 30 May 2015
4×1500 m relay 16:33.58 Nassau, Bahamas 24 May 2014 African record

International competitions

Kipyegon (left) collecting her silver medal in the 1500 m at the 2015 World Championships in Beijing
Kipyegon (left) collecting her silver medal in the 1500 m at the 2015 World Championships in Beijing
Representing  Kenya
Year Competition Venue Position Event Result Notes
2010 World Cross Country Championships Bydgoszcz, Poland 4th Junior race 19:02
1st Junior team 10 pts
2011 World Cross Country Championships Punta Umbria, Spain 1st Junior race 18:53
2nd Junior team 19 pts
World Youth Championships Lille, France 1st 1500 m 4:09.48 CR
2012 World Junior Championships Barcelona, Spain 1st 1500 m 4:04.96 CR
Olympic Games London, United Kingdom 21st (h) 1500 m 4:08.78
2013 World Cross Country Championships Bydgoszcz, Poland 1st Junior race 17:51
1st Junior team 14 pts
World Championships Moscow, Russia 5th 1500 m 4:05.08
2014 World Relays Nassau, Bahamas 1st 4×1500 m 16:33.58 WR
Commonwealth Games Glasgow, United Kingdom 1st 1500 m 4:08.94
2015 World Championships Beijing, China 2nd 1500 m 4:08.96
2016 Olympic Games Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 1st 1500 m 4:08.92
2017 World Cross Country Championship Kampala, Uganda 6th Senior race 32:49
1st Senior team 10 pts
World Championships London, United Kingdom 1st 1500 m 4:02.59
2019 World Championships Doha, Qatar 2nd 1500 m 3:54.22
2021 Olympic Games Tokyo, Japan 1st 1500 m 3:53.11 OR

Circuit wins and titles

See also

References

  1. ^ "Faith Chepngetich Kipyegon". London 2012. The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games Limited. Archived from the original on 30 July 2012. Retrieved 11 September 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d "Faith KIPYEGON – Athlete profile". World Athletics. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ a b Dennehy, Cathal (21 December 2021). "Faith Kipyegon Returned From Pregnancy Running Faster Than Ever Before". Runner's World. Retrieved 21 December 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ a b Katami, Michelle (18 December 2021). "Faith Kipyegon: How Kenyan achieved the mother of all feats in Tokyo". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 December 2021.
  5. ^ a b Jeffery, Nicole (9 July 2021). "Kipyegon cruises to Kenyan 1500m record in Monaco". World Athletics. Retrieved 9 July 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ "100 Most Influential Africans: Ten Kenyans Including CJ David Maraga Listed". Answers Africa. 7 December 2017. Retrieved 15 January 2021.
  7. ^ "38th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 2010 – U20 Results". World Athletics. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ "39th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 2011 – U20 Results". World Athletics. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ "IAAF World Youth Championships Lille 2011 – 1500 Metres Girls - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 9 July 2011. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "IAAF World Junior Championships Barcelona 2012 – 1500 Metres Women - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 15 July 2012. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "The XXX Olympic Games London 2012 – 1500m women - Heats summary". World Athletics. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ "40th IAAF World Cross Country Championships 2013 – U20 Results". World Athletics. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ "IAAF Diamond League 2013 Doha (QAT) – 1500m Women - Results" (PDF). static.sportresult.com. Diamond League. 10 May 2013. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ "IAAF World Championships Moscow 2013 – 1500 Metres Women - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 15 August 2013. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ "IAAF World Relays Nassau (BAH) 2014 – 4 x 1500 Metres (15 laps) Women - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 24 May 2014. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  16. ^ "Glasgow 2014 – Athletics - Women's 1500m Final". results.glasgow2014.com. XX Commonwealth Games. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. ^ "IAAF World Championships Beijing (CHN) – 1500 Metres Women - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 25 August 2015. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ "IAAF Diamond League | Brussels | 11 Sep 2015 – Results" (PDF). Diamond League. 11 September 2015. p. 13. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  19. ^ "Rio 2016 | Women's 1500m Final – Race Analysis" (PDF). 16 August 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 September 2016. Retrieved 17 August 2016.
  20. ^ Koech, B. M. "Faith Chepngetich: Gold Medalist | Athletes of Kenya". Archived from the original on 26 August 2016. Retrieved 17 August 2016.
  21. ^ Phillips, Mitch (17 August 2016). "Kenyan Kipyegon in late charge for 1,500m gold". Reuters. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  22. ^ "IAAF World Championships London – 1500 Metres Women - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 7 August 2017. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ "IAAF World Championships Doha 2019 – 1500 Metres Women - Final" (PDF). World Athletics. 5 October 2019. p. 1. Retrieved 1 January 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ "Wanda Diamond League Monaco 2020 – Results - 1000m Women" (PDF). static.sportresult.com. Diamond League. 10 September 2020. p. 1. Retrieved 10 September 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  25. ^ Jeffery, Nicole (14 August 2020). "Cheptegei breaks world 5000m record in Monaco as Diamond League action returns". World Athletics. Retrieved 14 August 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  26. ^ "The XXXII Olympic Games Tokyo 2021 – 1500 metres women - Final". World Athletics. Retrieved 1 January 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ "Focus on finalists: Faith Kipyegon and Ryan Crouser". World Athletics. 25 November 2021. Retrieved 25 November 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  28. ^ Cacciola, Scott (7 August 2021). "Faith Kipyegon of Kenya wins the 1,500 meters". New York Times. Retrieved 5 October 2021.
  29. ^ "All time Top lists – 1500 m Women – Senior Outdoor | until 2021-07-09". World Athletics. Retrieved 9 July 2021. Change filters for other age / territorial / time range((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  30. ^ "Diamond League Champions 2017: Brussels (BEL) 31 August - 1 September 2017" (PDF). Diamond League. 1 September 2017. p. 3. Retrieved 1 July 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  31. ^ "Wanda Diamond League Final | Letzigrund - Zürich (SUI) | 8th-9th September 2021" (PDF). Diamond League. 9 September 2021. p. 8. Retrieved 9 September 2021.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)