First McConnell government
3rd devolved government of Scotland
2001–2003
Date formed27 November 2001
Date dissolved20 May 2003
People and organisations
MonarchElizabeth II
First MinisterJack McConnell
First Minister's history2001–2007
Deputy First MinisterJim Wallace
Member parties
  •   Labour Party
  •   Liberal Democrats
Status in legislatureMajority (coalition)
70 / 129 (54%)
Opposition party  Scottish National Party
Opposition leaderJohn Swinney
History
Outgoing election2003 general election
Legislature term(s)1st Scottish Parliament
PredecessorMcLeish government
SuccessorSecond McConnell government

The first McConnell government was formed by Jack McConnell on 27 November 2001 during the 1st Scottish Parliament, following Henry McLeish's resignation as First Minister of Scotland as a consequence of the Officegate scandal.[1] The first McConnell government was a continuation of the LabourLiberal Democrat coalition that had existed under the previous McLeish and Dewar governments. It ended on 20 May 2003 following the 2003 election to the 2nd Scottish parliament, which saw McConnell returning to office as first minister to form a second government.

History

Henry McLeish resigned as first minister and leader of Scottish Labour in the aftermath of the Officegate scandal, which centred on expenses claimed for his Glenrothes constituency office.[2] McConnell was elected as Labour leader and was nominated for the post of first minister by a vote of the Scottish Parliament on 22 November, defeating Scottish National Party leader John Swinney, Scottish Conservative leader David McLetchie and Independent MSP Dennis Canavan by 70 votes to 34, 19 and 3 respectively.[3]

Shortly after being appointed McConnell began making appointments to his cabinet. Jim Wallace remained in the post of deputy first minister while Cathy Jamieson took over Mr McConnell's education brief and Wendy Alexander and Ross Finnie remained as ministers. Sam Galbraith and Angus MacKay stood down and Jackie Baillie, Sarah Boyack and Tom McCabe reshuffled out of government, while Susan Deacon was offered the post of social justice minister but refused the offer and moved to the backbenches. Cathy Jamieson, Mike Watson, Malcolm Chisholm, Iain Gray, Patricia Ferguson and Andy Kerr were all promoted to cabinet.

Wendy Alexander resigned for her post of Enterprise Minister on 4 May 2002. Her vacancy was filled by Iain Gray, and his post as Social Justice Minister was in turn filled by Margaret Curran, who had been his deputy.[4] Hugh Henry left the post of Deputy Minister for Health and Community Care on 9 May 2002, and took up the post of Deputy Minister for Social Justice.[5][6] Frank McAveety filled his vacancy.[5] Richard Simpson resigned from his post as Deputy Justice Minister on 26 November 2002, and was replaced by Hugh Henry.[7] Des McNulty filled Henry's vacancy as Deputy Health Minister.[8]

In the 2003 Scottish Parliament election, the LabourLiberal Democrat coalition was renewed and Jack McConnell returned to a second term as first minister and formed a second administration.

Cabinet

Cabinet[9][edit]

Post Minister Portrait Party Term
First Minister The Rt Hon. Jack McConnell MSP
Labour Party 2001–2003
Deputy First Minister The Rt Hon. Jim Wallace QC MSP
Liberal Democrats 2001–2003
Minister for Justice 2001–2003
Minister for Education and Young People Cathy Jamieson MSP
Labour Party 2001–2003
Minister for Social Justice Iain Gray MSP
Labour Party 2001–2002
Margaret Curran MSP
Labour Party 2002–2003
Minister for Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Wendy Alexander MSP
Labour Party 2001–2002
Iain Gray MSP
Labour Party 2002–2003
Minister for Culture and Sport Mike Watson MSP
Labour Party 2001–2003
Minister for Finance and Public Services Andy Kerr MSP
Labour Party 2001–2003
Minister for Health and Community Care Malcolm Chisholm MSP
Labour Party 2001–2003
Minister for Parliament Patricia Ferguson MSP
Labour Party 2001–2003
Minister for the Environment and Rural Development Ross Finnie MSP
Liberal Democrats 2001–2003
Lord Advocate The Rt Hon. Colin Boyd QC
Labour Party 2001–2003

Junior ministers

Junior ministers[9][edit]

Post Minister Party Term
Deputy Minister for Culture and Sport Dr Elaine Murray MSP Labour Party 2001–2003
Deputy Minister for Education and Young People Nicol Stephen MSP Liberal Democrats 1999–2000
Deputy Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Dr Lewis Macdonald MSP Labour Party 2001–2003
Deputy Minister for the Environment and Rural Development Allan Wilson MSP Labour Party 2001–2003
Deputy Minister for Finance and Public Services Peter Peacock MSP Labour Party 2001–2003
Deputy Ministers for Health and Community Care Hugh Henry MSP Liberal Democrats 2001–2002
Frank McAveety MSP Labour Party 2002–2003
Mary Mulligan MSP Labour Party 2001–2003
Deputy Minister for Justice Dr Richard Simpson MSP Labour Party 2001–2002
Hugh Henry MSP Labour Party 2002–2003
Deputy Minister for Parliamentary Business Euan Robson MSP Liberal Democrats 2001–2003
Deputy Ministers for Social Justice Margaret Curran MSP Labour Party 2001–2002
Hugh Henry MSP Labour Party 2002
Des McNulty MSP Labour Party 2002–2003
Solicitor General for Scotland Elish Angiolini QC Independent 2001–2003

References

  1. ^ "McConnell elected first minister". 22 November 2001. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  2. ^ "First minister to resign". 8 November 2001. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  3. ^ "22 November 2001: McConnell elected First Minister". 31 October 2009. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  4. ^ Gerry Hassan and Eric Shaw (2012). The Strange Death of Labour Scotland. Edinburgh University Press. p. 111. ISBN 978-0748640010.
  5. ^ a b Stephen Khan (5 May 2002). "Reshuffle is condemned as 'trawling for talent'". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  6. ^ "Hugh Henry". scottish.parliament.uk. Scottish Parliament. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  7. ^ "Minister quits over fire 'fascists' row". BBC News. 26 November 2002. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  8. ^ "Des McNulty". scottish.parliament.uk. Scottish Parliament. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  9. ^ a b "Ministers, Law Officer and Ministerial Parliamentary Aides by Cabinet: Session 1" (PDF). www.parliament.scot. Scottish Parliament. 30 March 2007. Retrieved 9 April 2017.