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For the Autonomies
Per le Autonomie
LeaderJulia Unterberger
Founded30 May 2001
IdeologyRegionalism
Christian democracy
Social democracy
Christian left
Political positionCentre to centre-left
Senate
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For the Autonomies (Italian: Per le Autonomie, Aut) is a heterogeneous centre-left and originally regionalist parliamentary group, which has been active, with slightly different names and different composition, in the Italian Senate since 2001.

History

The group was formed in May 2001 by six senators representing the northern special-statute autonomous regions of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol (composed of two autonomous provinces, Trentino and South Tyrol) and Aosta Valley, two senators of European Democracy (DE) and senators for life Giulio Andreotti (a long-time Christian Democrat, who was then a member of DE too) and Gianni Agnelli.[1] Instrumental in the formation of the group were Helga Thaler Ausserhofer, who served also as its first president, and Andreotti: the two formed a friendship and a strong political bond, despite their different geographical and political backgrounds.[2][3]

The group has since been home for the regionalist parties usually affiliated with the centre-left Olive Tree (Ulivo) coalition and, later, the Democratic Party (PD), including the South Tyrolean People's Party (SVP), the Trentino Tyrolean Autonomist Party (PATT), the Union for Trentino (UpT), the Valdostan Union (UV) and Valdostan Renewal (RV), and most senators for life, including Andreotti (2001–2006, 2008–2013), Agnelli (2001–2003), Francesco Cossiga (2003–2006, 2008–2010), Emilio Colombo (2008–2013), Carlo Rubbia (2013–2018), Elena Cattaneo (2013–present), Giorgio Napolitano (2015–present), Carlo Azeglio Ciampi (2015–2016) and Renzo Piano (2015–2018).

In 2006–2008 the group survived thanks to the participation of six senators of the would-be PD.[4] In 2008–2013 it welcomed the Union of the Centre (UdC), the Associative Movement Italians Abroad (MAIE) and some centre-right independent or minor-party senators; during that parliamentary term the group saw also the return of Andreotti and Cossiga.[5] In 2013–2018 the group notably welcomed the senators of the Italian Socialist Party (PSI) and, since 2014, those of Solidary Democracy (DeS).[6] Most recently, since 2018, the group featured also Pier Ferdinando Casini (Centrists for EuropeCP), who has continuously served in Parliament since 1983.[7]

Composition

2008–2013

Beginning of term

Party Main ideology MPs
South Tyrolean People's Party Regionalism 3
Union of the Centre Christian democracy 3
Valdostan Union Regionalism 1
Associative Movement Italians Abroad Centrism 1
Non-party independents 3
Total 11

Source: Senate of the Republic

End of term

Party Main ideology MPs
Union of the Centre Christian democracy 6
South Tyrolean People's Party Regionalism 3
Valdostan Union Regionalism 1
Toward North Regionalism 1
Italian Socialist Party Social democracy 1
Italian Republican Party Social liberalism 1
Italian Liberal Party Liberalism 1
Non-party independents 2
Total 16

Source: Senate of the Republic

2013–2018

Beginning of term

Party Main ideology MPs
South Tyrolean People's Party Regionalism 2
Italian Socialist Party Social democracy 2
Trentino Tyrolean Autonomist Party Regionalism 1
Union for Trentino Regionalism 1
Valdostan Union Regionalism 1
Democratic Party[a] Social democracy 1
Non-party independents 2
Total 10

Source: Senate of the Republic

  1. ^ Francesco Palermo, elected with the support of the South Tyrolean People's Party in the constituency of Bolzano.

End of term

Party Main ideology MPs
Italian Socialist Party Social democracy 3
South Tyrolean People's Party Regionalism 2
Solidary Democracy Christian left 2
Trentino Tyrolean Autonomist Party Regionalism 1
Union for Trentino Regionalism 1
Valdostan Union Regionalism 1
Democratic Party[a] Social democracy 1
Associative Movement Italians Abroad Centrism 1
Non-party independents 6
Total 18

Source: Senate of the Republic

  1. ^ Francesco Palermo, elected with the support of the South Tyrolean People's Party in the constituency of Bolzano.

2018–present

Beginning of term

Party Main ideology MPs
South Tyrolean People's Party Regionalism 3
Valdostan Union Regionalism 1
Democratic Party[a] Social democracy 1
Centrists for EuropeCP Centrism 1
Non-party independents 2
Total 8

Source: Senate of the Republic

  1. ^ Gianclaudio Bressa, elected with the support of the South Tyrolean People's Party in the constituency of Bolzano.

Current

Last update: 28 January 2021.

Party Main ideology MPs
South Tyrolean People's Party Regionalism 3
Valdostan Union Regionalism 1
Democratic Party[a] Social democracy 1
Centrists for Europe Centrism 1
Non-party independents 2
Total 8

Source: Senate of the Republic

  1. ^ Gianclaudio Bressa, elected with the support of the South Tyrolean People's Party in the constituency of Bolzano.

Leadership

References

  1. ^ "senato.it - Composizione del Gruppo Per le Autonomie nella XIV Legislatura". www.senato.it.
  2. ^ "Andreotti, Nobelpreisträger & die SVP". Salto.bz. February 22, 2018.
  3. ^ "I dubbi di Helga, sudtirolese con il "divo Giulio" nel cuore - Corriere della Sera". www.corriere.it.
  4. ^ "senato.it - Composizione del Gruppo Per le Autonomie nella XV Legislatura". www.senato.it.
  5. ^ "senato.it - Composizione del Gruppo Unione di Centro, SVP e Autonomie (Union Valdôtaine, MAIE, Verso Nord, Movimento Repubblicani Europei, Partito Liberale Italiano, Partito Socialista Italiano) nella XVI Legislatura". www.senato.it.
  6. ^ "senato.it - Composizione del Gruppo Per le Autonomie (SVP-UV-PATT-UPT)-PSI-MAIE nella XVII Legislatura". www.senato.it.
  7. ^ "senato.it - Composizione del Gruppo Per le Autonomie (SVP-PATT, UV)". www.senato.it.