This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article includes a list of general references, but it lacks sufficient corresponding inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (October 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Frame drum" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (December 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)
Frame drum
Different frame drums
Hornbostel–Sachs classification211.3
(Membranophone)
Musicians
Tambourine
Tambourine
Bodhrán with cipín (tipper)
Bodhrán with cipín (tipper)

A frame drum is a drum that has a drumhead width greater than its depth. It is one of the most ancient musical instruments, and perhaps the first drum to be invented. It has a single drumhead that is usually made of rawhide, but man-made materials may also used. Some frame drums have mechanical tuning, while on many others the drumhead is tacked in place. The drumhead is stretched over a round, wooden frame called a shell. The shell is traditionally constructed of rosewood, oak, ash etc. that has been bent and then scarf jointed together; though some are also made of plywood or man-made materials. Metal rings or jingles may also be attached to the frame. In many cultures larger frame drums are played mainly by men in spiritual ceremonies, while medium-size drums are played mainly by women.

Types of frame drums