Fred Carter
Fred Carter 1969.JPG
Carter in 1969
Personal information
Born (1945-02-14) February 14, 1945 (age 77)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Listed weight185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High schoolFranklin (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
CollegeMount St. Mary's (1965–1969)
NBA draft1969 / Round: 3 / Pick: 43rd overall
Selected by the Baltimore Bullets
Playing career1969–1977
PositionGuard / Small forward
Number3, 5
Coaching career1978–1994
Career history
As player:
19691971Baltimore Bullets
19711976Philadelphia 76ers
1976–1977Milwaukee Bucks
As coach:
1978–1981Mount St. Mary's (women's)
19811983Atlanta Hawks (assistant)
19831985Chicago Bulls (assistant)
19851987Washington Bullets (assistant)
19871993Philadelphia 76ers (assistant)
19931994Philadelphia 76ers (head coach)
Career statistics
Points9,271 (15.2 ppg)
Rebounds2,381 (3.9 rpg)
Assists2,122 (3.5 apg)
Stats Edit this at Wikidata at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Fredrick James Carter (born February 14, 1945), nicknamed "Mad Dog" or "Doggy",[1][2] is an American former professional basketball player and coach, who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for eight seasons (196977) for the Baltimore Bullets, Philadelphia 76ers, and Milwaukee Bucks.[2]

A 6' 3" guard from Mount St. Mary's University, Carter was selected by the Baltimore Bullets in the third round of the 1969 NBA draft. He was traded along with Kevin Loughery from the Bullets to the 76ers for Archie Clark, a 1973 second-round selection (19th overall–Louie Nelson) and cash on October 17, 1971.[3][4] Over the course of his NBA playing career, Carter scored 9,271 points; he was the leading scorer (20.0 PPG) on the 1973 Sixers team that lost an NBA record 73 of 82 regular-season games.[2] Carter later became the assistant coach for the Atlanta Hawks, Chicago Bulls, Washington Bullets, and Philadelphia 76ers, before becoming the head coach of the Sixers for almost two seasons, from late-1992 to mid-1994.[5]

Following his coaching tenure with the Sixers, Carter began a successful career as a basketball analyst for ESPN. During his time as co-host of NBA Tonight he was known for his claim of being "the best player on the worst team in NBA history."[6] He is currently an analyst on NBA TV.

On December 1, 2007, Carter had his jersey, number "33", retired at halftime of the Mount St. Mary's v. Loyola men's basketball game at Coach Jim Phelan Court in Knott Arena in Emmitsburg, Maryland.[7]

Carter is also known for popularizing the "fist bump."[8]

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1969–70 Baltimore 76 - 16.0 .358 - .690 2.5 1.6 - - 5.2
1970–71 Baltimore 77 - 22.2 .417 - .650 3.3 2.1 - - 10.4
1971–72 Baltimore 2 - 34.0 .222 - .333 9.5 6.0 - - 7.5
1971–72 Philadelphia 77 - 27.9 .444 - .630 4.0 2.6 - - 13.8
1972–73 Philadelphia 81 - 37.0 .421 - .704 6.0 4.3 - - 20.0
1973–74 Philadelphia 78 - 39.0 .430 - .709 4.8 5.7 1.4 0.3 21.4
1974–75 Philadelphia 77 - 39.6 .447 - .738 4.4 4.4 1.1 0.3 21.9
1975–76 Philadelphia 82 - 36.5 .417 - .702 3.6 4.5 1.7 0.2 18.9
1976–77 Philadelphia 14 - 16.9 .426 - .526 1.7 1.5 0.8 0.1 6.9
1976–77 Milwaukee 47 - 18.6 .416 - .753 2.0 2.2 0.6 0.1 8.3
Career 611 - 30.0 .425 - .693 3.9 3.5 1.2 0.2 15.2

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1969–70 Baltimore 7 - 36.1 .383 - .607 4.4 3.4 - - 14.1
1970–71 Baltimore 18 - 33.2 .415 - .644 4.6 2.0 - - 14.6
1975–76 Philadelphia 3 - 41.7 .433 - .867 3.3 5.0 1.3 0.3 28.0
Career 28 - 34.8 .410 - .687 4.4 2.7 1.3 0.3 15.9

References

  1. ^ Perner, Mark (March 14, 2016). "9-73 Sixers don't define Fred Carter". inquirer.com. Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Fred Carter Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  3. ^ "76ers Deal Clark to Bullets For Loughery and Carter," The Associated Press (AP), Sunday, October 17, 1971. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  4. ^ 1973 NBA Draft Pick Transactions, April 24 – Pro Sports Transactions. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  5. ^ "Fred Carter". Basketball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  6. ^ Kerby, Trey. "Fred Carter wants to remain immortal, if you don't mind," yahoo!sports, Wednesday, March 24, 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2022.
  7. ^ "Fred Carter". mountathletics.com. Mount St. Mary's Mountaineers. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  8. ^ Kennedy, Pagan (October 26, 2012). "Who Made That Fist Bump". nytimes.com. The New York Times Magazine. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 15, 2019.