The Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism is given annually for multiple categories of business reporting. The category "Editorials" was awarded in 1970–1972, "Columns/Editorial" in 1974–1976, "Columns" in 1977, "Columns/Editorial" again in 1978–1982, "Editorial/Commentary" in 1983–1984, and "Commentary" in 1985 onwards.

Gerald Loeb Award for Editorials (1970–1972)

Editorial Series:
"Today's Economy", 1969[1]
Editorials in Series:
  1. "Wall Street Changes",[2] December 20, 1970[3]
  2. "Wall Street Changes",[2] December 21, 1970[3]
  3. "Wall Street Changes",[2] December 22, 1970[3]
  4. "Wall Street Changes",[2] December 23, 1970[3]
Editorials in Series:
  1. "Market Place: Why Wall St. Sold Wrigley",[5] October 26, 1971[4]
  2. "Market Place: Price Swings: Limit Needed?",[6] December 7, 1971[4]
  3. "Market Place: Market Drops: Another View",[7] December 15, 1971[4]
  4. "Market Place: A Fresh Slant On Steep Dips",[8] December 23, 1971[4]
  5. "MarketPlace: Dumping Stock: Some Solutions",[9] December 31, 1971[4]

Gerald Loeb Award for Columns/Editorial (1973–1976, 1978–1982)

Columns in series:
  1. "Britain Faces Second Battle", July 13, 1975[15]
  2. "Wage Freeze Pivotal in Second Battle of Britain", July 14, 1975[16]
  3. "Status of the Pound Shows Monetary Optimism", July 15, 1975[17]
  4. "Britain's Industrial Troubles Keep Growing Worse", July 16, 1975[18]
  5. "The 'Second Battle of Britain' Must Be Won, Too", July 17, 1975[19]
Their series of articles described widespread national minimum wage law violations in the state of Georgia.[23]
Articles in series:
  1. "Part I: The Turpentine Men: Hard Woods Toil For Little Pay", December 1, 1979[24]
  2. "For Many Americans, Work Pays Off In Poverty", December 1, 1979[25]
  3. "Endless Debt Haunts Turpentiners", December 2, 1979[26]
  4. "Naval Stores Ages-Old, but Few Like Living in Past", December 2, 1979[27]
  5. "Part III: No Golden Eggs In Georgia’s Chicken Sheds", December 3, 1979[28]
  6. "Motel Maid’s Wages Fall Into Crevice In The Law", December 4, 1979[29]
  7. "Unique Deductions Push Pay Below U.S. Minimum", December 4, 1979[30]
  8. "Over 40 Years, A Corporation’s Pattern Of Underpaying Workers", December 5, 1979[31]
  9. "Munford: ‘Minimum Wage A Tragic Thing", December 5, 1979[32]
  10. "They'd Rather Collect Weeds Than Welfare", December 6, 1979[33]
  11. "Wage Law Enforcers Overwhelmed By Complaints", December 6, 1979[34]
  12. "Beverly Worrell Has Done Battle 38 Years For Nation’s Underpaid", December 6, 1979[35]
Article:
"Fooling With the Budget", October 1979[36]

Gerald Loeb Award for Columns (1977)

Gerald Loeb Award for Editorial/Commentary (1983–1984)

Article:
"Economic Prospects", August 29, 1983[43]

Gerald Loeb Award for Commentary (1985–present)

His editorial series discussed the international debt crisis, a letter on the U.S. economy by U.S. Catholic bishops, and bank failures.[44]
He was awarded for his "Economic Principles" column in The Boston Sunday Globe.[48]
Norris was awarded "for his insightful columns educating investors about the complexities of Wall Street."[59]
Columns:
  1. "Hands Out, Even in a Time Of Crisis", November 4, 2001[61]
  2. "A Benefit For the Few Weighs On Many", February 25, 2001[61]
  3. "Employers Dodge a Bullet That Their Workers Can't", April 15, 2001[61]
  4. "A Company Tested And Found Wanting", June 17, 2001[61]
  5. "Warning Signs Fail to Shake True Believers' Faith", August 12, 2001[61]
  6. "Price Targets Are Hazardous to Investor's Wealth", August 5, 2001[61]
  7. "Take Away the Window Dressing, ans Who Will Buy?", September 2, 2001[61]
His bold, punchy, and entertaining essays on the auto industry expressed depth of knowledge while conveying new information.[62]
Columns:
  1. "Hydrogen Bomb", February 8, 2002[63]
  2. "Horror Story", June 14, 2002[63]
  3. "Money Isn't Everything", July 19. 2002[63]
  4. "Falling in Love, August 26, 2002[63]
  5. "A Death on Route 9", September 18, 2002[63]
The judges said his columns were "smart, angry and sometimes laugh-out-loud funny, tackling complex subjects in a lively, accessible style with a strong voice and a real sense of being on the reader's side.[64]
Columns:
  1. "Tobacco Fires Back as Ads Become Sorely Personal", April 17, 2003[65]
  2. "SBC, It's All in the Way You Look at It", June 23, 2003[65]
  3. "Stock Picker, 20, a Genius? Perhaps in His Own Eyes", August 21, 2003[65]
  4. "Safeway's Merger Loss Eclipses Labor Woes", October 23, 2003[65]
  5. "City Putting a Pound in the Way of Progress", December 1, 2003[65]
  6. "Lockyer Not Above a Little Legal Aid", December 18, 2003[65]
Columns:
  1. "Fannie's Fearsome New Year Challenge", January 2, 2004[66]
  2. "Freddie Flap Highlights Fannie Flaw", January 30, 2004[66]
  3. "A New Reason to Fret About Fannie", April 1, 2004[66]
  4. "Fannie Flap Points to Options Grants", April 6, 2004[66]
  5. "Falcon Has Landed at Fannie Mae" May 6, 2004[66]
  6. "Fannie Probe Turns to Derivatives", September 2, 2004[66]
  7. "Fannie Fight Ready to Get Nastier", November 11, 2004[66]
Columns:
  1. "How About a Kianna's Law?", 2005[67]
  2. "Kianna's Legacy", 2005[67]
  3. "The FDA vs. Cancer Patients", 2005[67]
  4. Pazdur's Cancer Rules", 2005[67]
Columns:
  1. "Big Three Lumbering Toward Failure",[67] March 25, 2005[68]
  2. "Greenspan Misfires on Fannie, Freddie",[67] May 25, 2005[69]
  3. "Defection Could Be Just What Organizaed Labor Needs",[67] July 20, 2005[70]
  4. "Refiners' Merger Good for Business, Not Consumers",[67] September 7, 2005[71]
  5. "Boats Rose in New Orleans, but Not for the Poor",[67] September 14, 2005[72]
  6. "Alaska Would Be More at Home in Russia",[67] November 23, 2005[73]
  7. "When Breaking Up is Not Hard to Do",[67] December 14, 2005[74]
Columns:
  1. "Key West Academy", February 1, 2006[76]
  2. "Bluto does good", March 10, 2006[76]
  3. "Gov. Jobs is MIA", April 5, 2006[76]
  4. "Good job, lost wages", May 10, 2006[76]
  5. "Friendly Fenway", July 26, 2006[76]
  6. "An American dream denied", October 18, 2006[76]
  7. "Happy 50th, Marty", November 29, 2006[76]
Columns:
  1. "A Double Shot Of Nostalgia For Starbucks", March 3, 2007[78]
  2. "Well-Meaning But Misguided Stock Screens", April 7, 2007[78]
  3. "Weighing Jobs's Role In a Scandal", April 28, 2007[78]
  4. "IPhone Spin Goes Round And Round", June 30, 2007[78]
  5. "How The Bancrofts Blew It", August 4, 2007[78]
  6. "What If C.E.O. Pay Is Fair?", October 13, 2007[78]
  7. "The Pursuit Of Justice, Or Money?", December 8, 2007[78]
Columns
  1. "Real answers for Big 3 sting", January 31, 2007[79]
  2. "Who will save state when even boosters bail?", March 7, 2007[79]
  3. "A tough blow, a long road ahead", June 23, 2007[79]
  4. "A state in a state of denial", September 21, 2007[79]
  5. "Tactics from 1970 don't fit '07 reality", September 25, 2007[79]
Articles in Series:
  1. "Fannie Mae Alchemy", 2008[81]
  2. "A More Honest Socialism", 2008[81]
  3. "The Price of Fannie Mae", 2008[81]
  4. "Paulson's Fannie Test", 2008[81]
  5. "Whitewashing Fannie Mae", 2008[81]
Articles in Series:
  1. "Capitalist Fools", January 2009[83]
  2. "Wall Street's Toxic Message", July 2009[83]
Columns:
  1. "Fiscal Scare Tactics", February 5, 2010[85]
  2. "Now That's Rich", August 23, 2010[85]
  3. "Downhill With The G.O.P.", September 24, 2010[85]
  4. "The Hijacked Commission", November 12, 2010[85]
  5. "The Humbug Express", December 24, 2010[85]
Columns:
  1. "Time for Plan B", January 15, 2011[87]
  2. "They're bust. Admit it.", April 2, 2011[87]
  3. "How to save the euro", September 17, 2011[87]
  4. "Europe's rescue plan", October 29, 2011[87]
  5. "Is this really the end?", November 26, 2011[87]
Articles in Series:
  1. "Facebook ought to ditch its initial public offering", 2012[89]
  2. "Law firms have struck the limits of partnership", 2012[89]
  3. "JPMorgan's fiasco exposes the myth of an imperial CEO", 2012[89]
  4. "It is too late for America to eliminate Huawei", 2012[89]
  5. "HP should have known all about Autonomy", November 21, 2012[89]
Columns:
  1. "The collaboration curse: The fashion for making employees collaborate has gone too far", January 23, 2016[94]
  2. "Mafia management: The crime families of Naples are remarkably good at business", August 27, 2016[94]
  3. "Shhhh! Companies would benefit from helping introverts to thrive", September 10, 2016[94]
  4. "Out with the old. Management theory is becoming a compendium of dead ideas", December 17, 2016[94]
  5. "Capitalism and democracy: The West confronts a future of slow growth, social division and populist revolt", December 24, 2016[94]
Columns:[97]
  1. "Elon Musk's Uncontested 3-Pointers", February 26, 2018
  2. "A Better Way to Make Facebook Pay", April 9, 2018
  3. "Advice to New Grads: Scale or Bail", May 21, 2018
  4. "General Electric's Long Unwinding", June 25, 2018
  5. "Anything Good Takes Exactly Five Meetings", November 19, 2018
Columns in Series:
  1. "Yes, I was hired because I was Black. But that’s not the only reason.", September 18, 2020[100]
  2. "Stop telling Black people we could close the wealth gap if we valued education more", September 25, 2020[101]
  3. "The legacy of slavery made my grandmother fear investing", October 9, 2020[102]
  4. "Credit scores are supposed to be race-neutral. That’s impossible.", October 16, 2020[103]
  5. "Being Black lowers the value of my home: The legacy of redlining", October 23, 2020[104]
  6. "Yes, Black Americans are entitled to reparations. We’ve earned them.", October 30, 2020[105]
  7. "Systemic racism, not $200 Air Jordans, suppresses Black wealth", November 6, 2020[106]
  8. "Black businesses are fighting for their lives. We can’t afford to lose them.", November 20, 2020[107]
  9. "Racial microaggressions take a major toll on Black Americans", December 4, 2020[108]
  10. "Black Americans donate a higher share of their wealth than Whites", December 11, 2020[109]
Columns in series:[111]
  1. "The ongoing baby formula shortage is a reminder of a disturbing truth in America", September 21, 2022[112]
  2. "The baby formula crisis wasn’t a complete disaster. Here’s why.", September 26, 2022[113]
  3. "The U.S. should never have another baby formula shortage", October 6, 2022[114]

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