Global Young Academy
Formation2010
TypeAcademy of Sciences
Region
Worldwide
Membership
200 (full capacity)
Co-Chairs
Anindita Bhadra, Michael Saliba
Managing Director
Beate Wagner
Past Co-Chairs
Koen Vermeir, Connie Nshemereirwe
Main organ
Executive Committee, elected by the General Assembly
AffiliationsInterAcademy Partnership, International Science Council
Websiteglobalyoungacademy.net
Members and alumni of the Global Young Academy at the 2019 anniversary Annual General Meeting at the Leopoldina in Halle, Germany
Members and alumni of the Global Young Academy at the 2019 anniversary Annual General Meeting at the Leopoldina in Halle, Germany

The Global Young Academy is an international society of young scientists, aiming to give a voice to young scientists across the globe.[1][2][3][4]

Membership strength is capped at 200, and the membership tenure is 5 years.

Organization and membership

The Global Young Academy (GYA) aims to be the "Voice for Young Scientists" and encourages international, intergenerational, and interdisciplinary collaboration and dialogue.[5]

The GYA has working groups on science education, science and society, early career development, and interdisciplinary issues.[6]

The 2019/2020 Executive Committee of the Global Young Academy together with its Managing Director and office staff.
The 2019/2020 Executive Committee of the Global Young Academy together with its Managing Director and office staff.

The typical age of members is approximately 35 years old; members are expected to be several years past their doctoral studies.[6][7] The number of members is capped at 200, and each scientist is limited to a five-year term of membership. Memberships are offered based on scientific excellence, after a process of nominations from senior scientists, national societies, and self-nominations, together with peer review by members.[6][8] The GYA reached its full capacity of 200 members in 2014. In addition, there are 258 alumni. As of 2019, 83 countries are represented at the GYA.

The office of the GYA is hosted at the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina in Halle (Saale), Germany.

History

The Global Young Academy was founded in 2010 in Berlin, Germany, after a preliminary organizational meeting in 2008 sponsored by the InterAcademy Panel on International Issues and the World Economic Forum and a second organizational meeting in 2009 in Dalian, China.[9][10][11] Its founding co-chairs are Gregory Weiss, a chemist from the University of California, Irvine, United States, and Nitsara Karoonuthaisiri from the National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology in Thailand.[6][10][12][13] The outgoing (2018) co-chairs are Drs. Tolu Oni, University of Cape Town, South Africa, and Connie Nshemereirwe, Actualise Africa, Uganda.[14] The current (2019) co-chairs are Drs. Connie Nshemereirwe and Koen Vermeir.[15]

The GYA cooperates closely with most major scientific organizations around the world such as UNESCO, the UN Secretary General's Scientific Advisory Board, ISC (formerly ICSU), IAP, the Global Research Council, the European Commission's Joint Research Centre and The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS). The GYA is active in helping establish national young academies around the world. In 2017, three national young academies were launched in Albania, Estonia, and Finland. The GYA also developed several international research projects and campaigns in recent years. Recently, the GYA was invited to join the advisory board of the UN Major Group for Children and Youth (UN MGCY). Since 2019, the GYA has been named a full member of the InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), the global network of 138 academies of science, engineering and medicine.[16]

Goals

The academy aims to bring together young scientists to solve global problems and policy issues that require interdisciplinary expertise,[9][10] encourage young people to enter scientific careers,[9][17] promote a scientific culture in which excellence in research is more highly valued than seniority,[9][7] and improve the foundations of science worldwide by providing encouragement and recognition to researchers in countries with underdeveloped national scientific programs.[6][7]

One particular focus of the GYA is facilitating the growth of the global network of (national) young academies around the world.[6][10] The GYA has actively aided the establishment of national young academies around the world. For example, Indian National Young Academy of Sciences, New Delhi was established in 2015 in lines with GYA. Since 2010, around 36 national young academies have been established. As of 2019, there are 41 national young academies, and more than 10 similar bodies around the world. More are close to launching in 2019.[18]

Notable members


References

  1. ^ Brück, Tilman; Beaudry, Catherine; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Salah el Din Mohamed, Hiba; Weiss, Gregory A. (April 2010), "Empowering Young Scientists", Science, 328 (5974): 17, doi:10.1126/science.1185745, PMID 20360070.
  2. ^ Jones, Nicola (March 2011), "Homecoming queen: Global Young Academy co-chair says the organization can help reintegrate western-educated scientists", Nature, doi:10.1038/news.2011.126.
  3. ^ Vasich, Tom (April 2010), Early career scientists unite: Global Young Academy, co-chaired by UCI chemist Gregory Weiss, supports, gives voice to world's junior researchers, University of California, Irvine, archived from the original on 2013-04-08, retrieved 2011-03-22.
  4. ^ Alberts, Bruce (2011), "The Young Academy Movement", Science, 332 (6027): 283, Bibcode:2011Sci...332..283A, doi:10.1126/science.1206690, PMID 21493825.
  5. ^ Sutherland, M.; Garcia-Martinez, J. (2013). "The Global Young Academy: Providing a Voice for Young Scientists in the Sustainability Debate". Chemistry International. 35 (1): 4–7. ISSN 0193-6484.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Jones, Nicola (March 2011), "Homecoming queen: Global Young Academy co-chair says the organization can help reintegrate western-educated scientists", Nature, doi:10.1038/news.2011.126.
  7. ^ a b c Brüning, Anne (April 13, 2010), ""Mehr Freiraum für junge Talente": Tilman Brück vom Deutschen Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung über junge Wissenschaftler, die alternde Gesellschaft und wer als Top-Nachwuchforscher gelten kann", Frankfurter Rundschau (in German).
  8. ^ Brück, Tilman; Beaudry, Catherine; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Kassen, Rees; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Salah el Din Mohamed, Hiba; Weiss, Gregory A. (August 2010), "Response—The Time of Young Scientists", Science, 329 (5992): 626–627, doi:10.1126/science.329.5992.626-b.
  9. ^ a b c d Brück, Tilman; Beaudry, Catherine; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Salah el Din Mohamed, Hiba; Weiss, Gregory A. (April 2010), "Empowering Young Scientists", Science, 328 (5974): 17, doi:10.1126/science.1185745, PMID 20360070.
  10. ^ a b c d Vasich, Tom (April 2010), Early career scientists unite: Global Young Academy, co-chaired by UCI chemist Gregory Weiss, supports, gives voice to world's junior researchers, University of California, Irvine, archived from the original on 2013-04-08, retrieved 2011-03-22.
  11. ^ Tickner, James (2010), "The Launch of the Global Young Academy", Australian Quarterly, 82 (1): 18–21.
  12. ^ BIOTEC researcher elected founding co-chair of Global Young Academy (GYA), National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, April 2010, retrieved 2011-03-22[permanent dead link].
  13. ^ Chandrapanya, Klomjit, "One to Watch: She is just a few years out of school, and already Nitsara Karoonuthaisiri is head of the government's first microarray lab, and helping the next wave of even younger scientists achieve the same success", The Scientist, retrieved 2011-03-22.
  14. ^ "Team". Global Young Academy. Retrieved 2018-12-30.
  15. ^ "New Executive Committee and Co-Chairs elected at AGM 2018". Global Young Academy. Retrieved 2019-07-01.
  16. ^ "Global Young Academy named a full member of the InterAcademy Partnership". Global Young Academy. Retrieved 2019-07-01.
  17. ^ Atukorala, Sunethra (2010), "Promoting research among young scientists in Sri Lanka", Journal of the National Science Foundation of Sri Lanka, 38 (4): 211–212, doi:10.4038/jnsfsr.v38i4.2646.
  18. ^ "National Young Academies". Global Young Academy. Retrieved 2019-08-24.