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Manchester Central Library
Barton Swing Aqueduct in the closed position
Barton Swing Aqueduct in the closed position

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest".[1] In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[2] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

The metropolitan county of Greater Manchester is made up of 10 metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan. The Grade II* buildings in each borough are listed separately. Manchester, the world's first industrialised city,[3] has 77 of Greater Manchester's 238 Grade II* listed buildings, the highest number of any borough. Bury has the least, with only eight. The River Irwell forms the boundary between Salford and Trafford, so one listed structure, Barton Swing Aqueduct, has been listed under both Salford and Trafford.

Most of Greater Manchester's listed buildings date from the Victorian and Edwardian periods.[1] According to an Association for Industrial Archaeology publication, Greater Manchester is "one of the classic areas of industrial and urban growth in Britain, the result of a combination of forces that came together in the 18th and 19th centuries: a phenomenal rise in population, the appearance of the specialist industrial town, a transport revolution, and weak local lordship".[4] Much of the region, historically a part of Lancashire, was at the forefront of textile manufacturing from the early 19th century until the early 20th century, and the county includes several former mill towns.[5][6] Greater Manchester has a wealth of industrial heritage, represented by industrial architecture found throughout the county,[6] but many of its Grade II* listed buildings have a municipal, ecclesiastic or other cultural heritage.

It is uncertain which Grade II* listed structure in Greater Manchester is the oldest. However, three of the 238 buildings date from the 13th century, making them the oldest. Brandlesholme Old Hall in Bury was once an open-hall cruck-framed house, originating in the 13th century, although altered and extended in the 16th century and completely remodelled in 1849.[7] The Church of St Chad in Rochdale has a 13th-century tower (with an 1870 extension).[8] And Mab's Cross in Wigan, the stump of a boundary cross, is probably 13th century in origin.[9] The newest Grade II* listed building in Greater Manchester is the Daily Express Building, designed by Sir Owen Williams in 1939.[10] Due to the heavy impact of the Industrial Revolution on Greater Manchester, just under half of its Grade II* listed buildings (112, 47%) were completed in the 19th century.

Bolton

Bury

Manchester

Oldham

Rochdale

Salford

Stockport

Tameside

Trafford

Wigan

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j The date given is the date used by Historic England as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building and scheduled monument by Historic England.

References

  1. ^ a b "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 8 December 2007.
  2. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Archived from the original on 18 April 2010. Retrieved 17 December 2007.
  3. ^ Kidd, Alan (2006). Manchester: A History. Lancaster, Lancashire: Carnegie Publishing Ltd. ISBN 1-85936-128-5.
  4. ^ McNeil and Nevell (2000), A Guide to the Industrial Archaeology of Greater Manchester, p. 2.
  5. ^ Cowhig, W.T. (1976). It Happened Round Greater Manchester; Textiles. Greater Manchester Council.
  6. ^ a b McNeil and Nevell (2000), A Guide to the Industrial Archaeology of Greater Manchester, p. 2–3.
  7. ^ "Brandlesholme Old Hall, Bury". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  8. ^ "Church of St Chad, Rochdale". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  9. ^ "Mab's Cross, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  10. ^ "Daily Express Building, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 6 July 2008.
  11. ^ "Brandlesholme Old Hall". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  12. ^ "Christ Church, Walshaw". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  13. ^ "Dearden Fold Farmhouse". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  14. ^ Historic England. "Hey House (44308)". Research records (formerly PastScape). Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  15. ^ "Lower Chesham". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  16. ^ "Presbyterian Chapel, Radcliffe". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  17. ^ "Radcliffe Cenotaph". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  18. ^ "25 St Ann Street, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  19. ^ "38 and 42 Mosley Street, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  20. ^ "Mrs Gaskell's House, 84 Plymouth Grove, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  21. ^ "Midland Bank, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  22. ^ "Asia House, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  23. ^ "The Athenaeum, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  24. ^ "Barton's Building including Barton Arcade, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  25. ^ "Beehive Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  26. ^ "Britannia Hotel, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  27. ^ "GMB National College, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  28. ^ "Brookfield Unitarian Church, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  29. ^ "Brownfield Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  30. ^ "Christ Church, Moss Side, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  31. ^ "Church and Friary of St Francis, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  32. ^ "Church of St. Cross, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  33. ^ "Church of St. George, Chester Road, Hulme". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  34. ^ "Church of St James, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  35. ^ "Church of St John the Evangelist, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  36. ^ "Church of St Mary, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  37. ^ "Church of St. Michael and All Angels, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  38. ^ "Church of St Nicholas, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  39. ^ "Listed buildings in Manchester by street (O)". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 2 July 2008.
  40. ^ "Church of St Peter, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 2 July 2008.
  41. ^ "Church of St. Wilfrid, Northenden". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  42. ^ "City Police Courts, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  43. ^ "Clayton Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  44. ^ "Colonnade by lake to south of Heaton Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  45. ^ "County Court, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  46. ^ "Daily Express Building, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  47. ^ "Dale Warehouse, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  48. ^ "Manchester Polytechnic, Didsbury School of Education, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  49. ^ "Doubling Mill and Fireproof Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  50. ^ "Brookfield Unitarian Church, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  51. ^ "Church of St. Wilfrid, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  52. ^ "Former National Westminster Bank, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  53. ^ "Free Trade Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  54. ^ "Deansgate Goods Station And attached carriage Ramp, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  55. ^ "Student Health Centre, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  56. ^ "Grand Lodge, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  57. ^ "Temple north east of Heaton Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  58. ^ "Church of Holy Trinity, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  59. ^ "Hough End Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  60. ^ "India House, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  61. ^ "Former Rochdale Canal Warehouse". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  62. ^ "Lancaster House, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  63. ^ "Lawrence Buildings, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  64. ^ "London Road Fire Station, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  65. ^ "War Memorial, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  66. ^ "Manchester Central Library, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  67. ^ "G-Mex, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  68. ^ "Manchester Jewish Museum, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  69. ^ "Manchester Law Library, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  70. ^ "Former Reform Club, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  71. ^ "Manchester Town Hall Extension, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  72. ^ "103 Princess Street, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  73. ^ "Memorial Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  74. ^ "Midland Hotel, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  75. ^ "New Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  76. ^ "Doubling Mill and Fireproof Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  77. ^ "The Pankhurst Centre, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  78. ^ "New Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  79. ^ "Parrs Wood House, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  80. ^ "Peacock Mausoleum, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 27 May 2008.
  81. ^ "Platt Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  82. ^ "Portico Library, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  83. ^ "Refuge Assurance Company Offices, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  84. ^ "Rose Hill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  85. ^ "Royal Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  86. ^ "Slade Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  87. ^ "Smithy Lodge, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  88. ^ "Church of St James, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  89. ^ "The Towers (Shirley Institute), Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  90. ^ "Tootal, Broadhurst and Lee Building, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  91. ^ "Islamic Academy, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  92. ^ "Victoria Baths, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  93. ^ "Victoria Mill, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  94. ^ "Victoria University of Manchester including Christie Library, Whitworth Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 29 May 2008.
  95. ^ The Buildings of England - Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East, p. 498
  96. ^ "Wythenshawe Hall, Manchester". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 30 May 2008.
  97. ^ "Church of St Chad, Uppermill". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  98. ^ Oldham Metropolitan Borough Council. "Church of St Chad, Uppermill". Oldham.gov.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  99. ^ "Heights Chapel, Saddleworth". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  100. ^ "Higher Kinders". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  101. ^ Oldham Metropolitan Borough Council. "Higher Kinders". Oldham.gov.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  102. ^ "Shore Mill". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  103. ^ "Church of St Anne's, Royton". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  104. ^ Oldham Metropolitan Borough Council. "Church of St Anne, Royton". Oldham.gov.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  105. ^ "Church of St Mary and St Peter, Oldham". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  106. ^ "Church of St Thomas, Lees". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  107. ^ "Foxdenton Hall". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  108. ^ "Independent Methodist Chapel, Oldham". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  109. ^ "1-5 Hollins Road, previously Hathershaw Hall". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 24 February 2008.
  110. ^ "Church of St George, Carrington". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  111. ^ "Dunham Massey sawmill". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  112. ^ a b The Barton Swing Aqueduct crosses the Manchester Ship Canal and is in the boroughs of both Salford and Trafford "Barton Swing Aqueduct". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  113. ^ "Church of John the Divine, Sale". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  114. ^ "Church of Margaret, Altrincham". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  115. ^ "Church of Martin, Sale". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  116. ^ "Church of Mary the Virgin, Bowdon". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 15 December 2007.
  117. ^ "Church of Michael, Urmston". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  118. ^ "Hale Chapel". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  119. ^ "Halecroft". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  120. ^ "Ackhurst Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  121. ^ "Administration block at Astley Hospital, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  122. ^ "Astley Vicarage, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  123. ^ "Alder House, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  124. ^ "Chanters Farmhouse, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  125. ^ "Church of St Michael and All Angels, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  126. ^ "Chowbent Unitarian Chapel, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  127. ^ "Barn and stable to east of Winstanley Hall and two attached gateways, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  128. ^ "Bispham Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  129. ^ "Bradley Hall Public House, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  130. ^ "Church of All Saints, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  131. ^ "Church of St James with St Thomas, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  132. ^ "Church of St John, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  133. ^ a b c "Listed Buildings in Wigan Metropolitan Borough Council" (PDF). Wigan Metropolitan Borough Coulcil. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 March 2009. Retrieved 14 December 2007.
  134. ^ "Church of St Mary, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  135. ^ "Church of St Mary, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  136. ^ "Church of St Matthew, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  137. ^ "Church of St Michael, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  138. ^ "Church of St Peter, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  139. ^ "Giant's Hall Farmhouse, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  140. ^ "Gateway and Lodges to Haigh Hall Park, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  141. ^ "Kirkless Hall and Kirkless Hall farmhouse, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  142. ^ "Leigh Mill, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  143. ^ "Light Oaks Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  144. ^ "Lightshaw Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  145. ^ "Mab's Cross, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  146. ^ "Manor House, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  147. ^ "Morley's Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  148. ^ "War Memorial south of Church of All Saints with encircling railings, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.
  149. ^ "Winstanley Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  150. ^ "Worthington Hall, Wigan". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2008.