Dublin
History
Royal Navy Ensign
United Kingdom
NameDublin
Ordered31 July 1807
BuilderBrent, Rotherhithe
Laid downMay 1809
Launched13 February 1812
FateSold, 1885
General characteristics [1]
Class and typeVengeur-class ship of the line
Tons burthen1772 bm
Length176 ft (53.6 m) (gundeck)
Beam47 ft 6 in (14.5 m)
Depth of hold21 ft (6.4 m)
PropulsionSails
Sail planFull-rigged ship
Armament
  • Gundeck: 28 × 32-pounder guns
  • Upper gundeck: 28 × 18-pounder guns
  • QD: 4 × 12-pounder guns, 10 × 32-pounder carronades
  • Fc: 2 × 12-pounder guns, 2 × 32-pounder carronades
  • Poop deck: 6 × 18-pounder carronades

HMS Dublin was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 13 February 1812 at Rotherhithe.[1]

Dublin shared the proceeds of the capture on 17 July 1813 of Union with Abercrombie.[a]

On 19 December 1812 HMS Rolla recaptured the whaler Frederick. Rolla shared the salvage money for Frederick with Dublin and Inconstant.[3]

A ball given on board by Admiral Hamond in 1835, painting by Emeric Essex Vidal
A ball given on board by Admiral Hamond in 1835, painting by Emeric Essex Vidal

In 1826 Dublin was reduced to a 40-gun ship. She became the flagship of Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific fleet Admiral Sir Graham Hamond, 2nd Baronet from 1835 to 1838, and Rear Admiral Richard Darton Thomas (1777–1857), from 1841 to 1845.[4]

Dublin was sold out of the Navy in 1885.[1]

Notes, citations and references

Notes
  1. ^ A first-class share of the prize money was worth £7 19s 2¾d; a sixth-class share was worth 11½d.[2]
Citations
  1. ^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line, vol. 1, p. 188.
  2. ^ "No. 17025". The London Gazette. 17 June 1815. p. 1171.
  3. ^ "No. 16749". The London Gazette. 3 July 1813. p. 1316.
  4. ^ "Mid-Victorian RN vessel HMS Dublin". Retrieved 21 February 2010.
References