Harwich Mariners
Harwich Mariners Logo.png
Information
LeagueCape Cod Baseball League (East Division)
LocationHarwich, Massachusetts
BallparkWhitehouse Field at Monomoy Regional High School
League championships1933, 1983, 1987, 2008, 2011
ColorsRed, White and Navy
ManagerSteve Englert
General ManagerBen Layton
PresidentMary Henderson
Websitewww.harwichmariners.org

The Harwich Mariners are a collegiate summer baseball team based in Harwich, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Cape Cod Baseball League (CCBL) and plays in the league's East Division. The Mariners play their home games at Whitehouse Field in the historic village of Harwich Center.

Harwich has won two CCBL championships in the 21st century, most recently in 2011 by defeating the Falmouth Commodores two games to none to win the best of three championship series. The title was the team's fourth in the CCBL's modern era and fifth overall. The team has been led since 2003 by field manager Steve Englert.

History

Pre-modern era

Artie Gore was a flashy infielder for Chatham-Harwich from 1927 to 1929, and went on to a ten-year umpiring career in the National League.
Artie Gore was a flashy infielder for Chatham-Harwich from 1927 to 1929, and went on to a ten-year umpiring career in the National League.

Early years

Organized baseball in the town of Harwich dates to the late 1800s. As early as 1873, the "Independent Base Ball Club" had been organized and was playing at the "Brooks Estate" in Harwich.[1] The Harwich town club took on Sandwich in an 1884 contest,[2] and played the "Yarmouth Grays" on multiple occasions in 1886.[3][4] In 1903, the town's "Old Home Week" featured a three-game baseball series in which the Harwich team defeated Sandwich twice and Hyannis once. The home club was described as "the best that ever represented Harwich,"[5] and featured several collegiate players, as well as local hurler Dick Gage, who in 1905 was described as "by far the best pitcher on the Cape."[6]

The early Cape League era (1923–1939)

In 1923, the Cape Cod Baseball League was formed and initially included four teams: Falmouth, Chatham, Osterville, and Hyannis.[7] This early Cape League operated through the 1939 season and disbanded in 1940, due in large part to the difficulty of securing ongoing funding during the Great Depression.[8][9]

Harwich originally entered the Cape League as part of a combined Chatham-Harwich team that competed in the league from 1927 to 1929. The team's home games were split between the two town fields.[10][11] In the inaugural 1927 season, the team finished fourth in the five-team league, but nevertheless was described as "the hardest hitting team in the league."[12] 1927 Chatham-Harwich first baseman Jack Burns went on to play in seven major league seasons for the St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers.[13][14][15][16] In all three seasons from 1927 to 1929, the team featured Boston College batterymates pitcher Pete Herman and catcher George Colbert, as well as flashy infielder Artie Gore. The trio of Herman, Colbert and Gore later teamed up again with Barnstable to bring that club multiple Cape League championships in the 1930s.[17][18] Gore went on to a major league umpiring career, working ten years in the National League, including two World Series assignments.

Bill Chamberlain was one of the first Harwich players to go on to the major leagues.
Bill Chamberlain was one of the first Harwich players to go on to the major leagues.

In 1930, the Chatham-Harwich team split and the two towns entered individual teams in the league, with Harwich playing its home games at Brooks Park. Throughout the 1930s as other teams struggled to stay in the league, Harwich was consistently among the best funded and best supported teams in the Cape League.[19][20]

One of the first Harwich players to go on to the major leagues was Milton, Massachusetts native Bill Chamberlain. In 1932, Chamberlain was pitching for Harwich when he was noticed by a scout for the Chicago White Sox. Chamberlain was playing in Chicago by the end of the season.[21]

In 1933, Harwich won its first Cape League championship. The team starred all-league selection Frank Skaff of Villanova, an outfielder who "covers acres of territory, catches everything in sight," and was "the dread of all opposing pitchers", and who went on to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers two years later.[22][23][24] The Cape League split its regular season in 1933, and held a playoff for the league title between the winners of the first and second halves of the season. Harwich, winners of the season's second half, faced first-half winners and back-to-back defending league champion Falmouth. Harwich took the first game of the best-of-five championship series with a 4–2 home win, then went on the road and dished out a 10–1 pummelling at Falmouth Heights. The series returned to Harwich for Game 3, where the home team sent ace hurler Al Blanche to the mound. Blanche, a Somerville, Massachusetts native who went on to play with the major league Boston Braves, outdueled Falmouth's Harold Poole, 3–1, to complete the three-game sweep and secure the title for Harwich.[25][26][27]

In 1937 and 1938, Harwich was led by player-manager Neil Mahoney, an all-Cape League selection at catcher who went on to be scouting director of the Boston Red Sox.[28][29][30] Mahoney's 1937 Harwich team featured Holy Cross pitcher Art Kenney and former Chicago White Sox outfielder Bill Barrett. Barrett had played several productive seasons in the major leagues, and finished tops in the Cape League in 1937 with a .440 batting average, as his "potent bat of bygone glory still [carried] a mean threat."[31][32][33] Kenney played in the following season for the major league Boston Bees (Braves).[34][35] Mahoney's 1938 team narrowly missed bringing Harwich its second league title, finishing the season just one game behind pennant-winning Falmouth.[36]

The Upper and Lower Cape League era (1946–1962)

After a hiatus during the years of World War II, the Cape League was reconstituted in 1946, with Harwich joining the Lower Cape Division.[37] In the inaugural season of the revived league, Harwich defeated Barnstable in the playoffs for the Lower Cape title,[38] but was shut down by Upper Cape champ Falmouth in the league championship series.[39][40] The 1946 season also featured the league's first All-Star Game, held at Harwich's Brooks Park. The contest matched a team of CCBL all-stars against a team of Boston Red Sox tryout players chosen by scouts of the major league team.[41]

In the 1949 and 1950 seasons, Harwich fielded two entries in the Cape League, as the Cape Verdean Club of Harwich joined the league's Lower Cape Division.[42][43][44]

Harwich did not reach the league title series again until 1962 when the team was downed by Upper Cape powerhouse Cotuit after defeating Chatham for the Lower Cape title.[45][46] Harwich's 1961 and 1962 teams featured CCBL Hall of Famer and longtime New Jersey Devils general manager Lou Lamoriello, who played in the CCBL until 1964, then skippered Sagamore to the league title in 1965.[47]

Former New Mexico Governor and US Ambassador to the United Nations Bill Richardson pitched for Harwich in 1968.

Modern era (1963–present)

In 1963, the CCBL was reorganized and became officially sanctioned by the NCAA. The league would no longer be characterized by "town teams" who fielded mainly Cape Cod residents, but would now be a formal collegiate league. Teams began to recruit college players and coaches from an increasingly wide geographic radius.[48]

The league was originally composed of ten teams, which were divided into Upper Cape and Lower Cape divisions. Harwich joined Orleans, Chatham, Yarmouth and a team from Otis Air Force Base in the Lower Cape Division.

The 1960s and 1970s

The Harwich teams of the mid- and late-1960s featured several notable players. Harwich's native son and Boston College hurler Peter Ford spent four summers with the team, posting a combined ERA of 3.36 with 18 wins and two league all-star selections. Ford later served as a Cape League vice president, and was inducted into the CCBL Hall of Fame in 2010.[49][50]

Harwich's 1966 team featured CCBL Hall of Famer Ed Drucker, who batted .382, set a league record with eight triples, and was named league MVP.[51] The 1967 Harwich team featured Northbridge, Massachusetts native and future major leaguer Glenn Adams, a center fielder who slugged three triples in a single game for the Mariners,[52] and blasted a homer in the CCBL All-Star Game at Eldredge Park.[53]

Whitehouse Field, home of the Mariners since 1969.
Whitehouse Field, home of the Mariners since 1969.

In 1968, CCBL Hall of Fame manager John Carroll took the reins and led the Mariners to a 26–13 record, winning the Lower Cape Division in the team's final season at Brooks Park.[54][55] The team included pitcher Bill Richardson, who went on to become the Governor of New Mexico and the United States Ambassador to the United Nations.[56][57] In the 1968 title series, Harwich faced Upper Cape champ Falmouth, who prevailed three games to one in what was the first of Falmouth's four consecutive titles from 1968 to 1971.[58] The following year the Mariners moved to their new home at Whitehouse Field.[59] The CCBL held its 1969 All-Star Game at the new ballpark, the Lower Cape emerging with a 4–0 victory.[60]

CCBL Hall of Famer Fred Ebbett took over the Mariners' managerial post in 1971 after over 20 highly successful seasons coaching baseball at Harwich High School. Ebbett skippered the team in 1971 and 1972, then again from 1975 to 1977. He went on to serve as CCBL Commissioner from 1984 to 1996, where he was a driving force behind the league's momentous transition to an all-wooden bat league in the mid-1980s.[61]

The Mariners qualified for the playoffs in 1974 behind CCBL Outstanding Pitcher Award winner Andy Muhlstock, but were bested in the semi-final round by Orleans. Piloted by first-year manager Don Prohovich, Harwich advanced to the CCBL title series in 1978 and followed up that appearance with a return to the finals in 1979. In both title series, the Mariners were defeated by a dominant Hyannis team that had rolled through the two regular seasons with records of 31–11 and 33–7–1.[62][63]

Baseball Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski was a fixture in the Harwich dugout during the 1981 MLB players strike.
Baseball Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski was a fixture in the Harwich dugout during the 1981 MLB players strike.

The 1980s bring a pair of league titles

In both 1981 and 1982, the Mariners boasted the league's Outstanding Pitcher Award winner: Greg Myers in 1981, and Scott Murray in 1982. The 1981 team featured Florida State University's Mike Yastrzemski, son of Baseball Hall of Famer and Boston Red Sox legend Carl Yastrzemski. Nearing the end of his major league playing career, the elder Yaz found himself with time on his hands that summer due to the 1981 Major League Baseball strike. As a result, he spent much of June and July in the Harwich Mariners' dugout keeping an eye on his son's progress.[64][65] The 1982 Mariners featured CCBL Hall of Fame slugger Pat Pacillo, who walloped 10 homers on the season.[66]

In 1983, Harwich finally broke through and claimed a CCBL title. Skippered by Steve Ring, the team returned the powerful Pacillo, who was good again for eight homers and a .338 batting average, and even went 1–0 with a 4.82 ERA as a pitcher. Rob Souza went 7–2 on the mound in the regular season, and led the league with a 2.45 ERA. The star of the team however was the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect Award winner, Cory Snyder. The CCBL Hall of Famer clouted an amazing league record 22 home runs with 50 RBI and 47 runs scored. He hit home runs in four consecutive at bats on July 7–8, and twice hit three home runs in a game.[67] The Mariners finished the regular season in third place, but eliminated Hyannis two games to one in the playoff semi-finals to earn a berth in the best-of-five title series against top-seeded Cotuit.[68]

In Game 1 of the 1983 championship series, the Mariners came out on the wrong end of a 1–0 pitchers' duel, won on an RBI single by Kettleer Will Clark. Games 2 and 3 were played as a doubleheader. In the front end of the twinbill, Harwich jumped all over the Kettleers with a seven-run second, including a grand slam by Jon Pequignot. Souza went the distance in a 16–6 Mariner rout at Lowell Park. The back end of the doubleheader was played at Whitehouse Field, where Harwich hurler Jeff Koenigsman stymied the Cotuit attack. The Mariners took it, 7–3, to go up two games to one. Games 4 and 5 were played the following day as another doubleheader. With their backs against the wall and trailing through much of Game 4 at home, the Kettleers staged a late-inning comeback to knot the series with an 8–7 win. The Game 5 finale at Harwich was an all-time classic. Cotuit got a three-run homer in the top of the first, and Harwich answered in the bottom of the frame with a Pacillo grand slam. Harwich starter Mike Ulian was hit hard for seven runs, and Souza, who had pitched a complete game the day before, came on and was effective in long relief. Mariner Doug Shields cranked a three-run homer in the seventh, and the score was tied at 7–7 going to the final frame. Cotuit's Greg Barrios launched a two-run dinger in the top of the ninth to put the Kettleers up, 9–7, and hope was waning for the Whitehouse faithful. The Mariners came down to their final out with nobody on in the bottom half of the inning, but Pacillo doubled, and Pequignot came through with a clutch homer to send the game to extra innings. Both teams threatened but did not score in the 10th. Robbie Smith came on in relief of Souza in the 11th and set down Cotuit in order. In the bottom of the 11th, Harwich's Jim Sasko drove in Pequignot from third for the series-winning RBI and Harwich's first Cape League championship in the modern era.[69][70][71]

The 1984 Mariners finished the regular season atop the league with an impressive 27–15 record, due in large part to the contributions of four CCBL Hall of Famers. League Outstanding Pro Prospect Award winner Mike Loggins batted .343 with 13 homers and was MVP of the CCBL All-Star Game at Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium.[50] Joe Magrane led the league with six wins and six complete games, posted a 2.46 ERA with 77 strikeouts in 80.1 innings, and pitched two shutout innings and was the winning pitcher in the CCBL All-Star Game.[47] Fellow all-star pitcher Scott Kamieniecki went 4–1 for the Mariners with a 2.14 ERA and 54 strikeouts.[72] Casey Close was a dual threat, batting .329 with six home runs while going 2–0 with a 3.19 ERA on the mound. Close returned to Harwich in 1985 and again enjoyed an all-star campaign with 11 home runs and 30 RBI.[50] CCBL Hall of Famer Scott Hemond was league MVP for Harwich in 1986; the outfielder/catcher slugged six home runs and led the league with a .358 batting average.[73]

Charles Nagy was playoff MVP of Harwich's 1987 championship season.
Charles Nagy was playoff MVP of Harwich's 1987 championship season.

Harwich wore the league crown again in 1987 for the second time in five years. On the mound, team MVP Dan Kite posted six wins and four complete games with a 2.21 ERA, and future major league all-star Charles Nagy of the University of Connecticut and Andy Berg were CCBL all-stars in the Mariners' bullpen. The team also featured future major leaguers John Flaherty, University of Massachusetts infielder Gary Disarcina, and slugger Bob Hamelin, who led the league with 11 home runs. Led by manager Bill Springman, the Mariners finished the regular season with the league's best record, and met Cotuit in the playoff semi-finals. In Game 1, Harwich struck early at home with a three-run bomb by Steve Finken in a four-run first inning, and Kite went the distance on the hill, striking out 13 Kettleers en route to a 4–2 win. Finken hit a two-run dinger in Game 2 at Lowell Park, and teammate Tom Boyce added a pair of homers, but it wasn't enough as Cotuit prevailed, 9–8 in 10 innings. Cotuit's Troy Chacon allowed only two Mariners hits in Game 3 at Whitehouse Field, but one of them was a second-inning solo shot by Boyce. Harwich starter Nelson Arriete made the lone run stand up, going the distance in the 1–0 shutout to advance the Mariners to the title series against Y-D.[74][75]

In Game 1 of the 1987 championship series at Whitehouse Field, the Red Sox chased Mariners starter Everett Cunningham from the mound in the fifth, and Nagy came on in relief trailing, 3–1. Boyce hit yet another clout in the seventh to narrow the margin, and Derek Lee proved the hero with a three-run go-ahead blast in the eighth. Nagy no-hit the Red Sox in 4 1/3 frames of relief, and the Mariners took the opener, 5–3. Kite went the distance for Harwich in Game 2 at Red Wilson Field, but scattered four runs and got little help from his bats in a 4–1 loss that knotted the series. Harwich got three runs in each of the first two innings of Game 3 on home turf, and Nagy came on in relief of starter Dave Menhart. For the second time in the series, Nagy no-hit the Red Sox over 4 1/3 innings of relief, and the Mariners came away with a 7–2 victory to secure the championship. Nagy, the playoff MVP, recorded the final out by way of strikeout against league MVP and batting champ Mickey Morandini, whom Nagy caught looking on a 3–2 count.[76]

The 1990s

The Mariners qualified for postseason play only once in the 1990s, reaching the title series in 1997 under skipper Chad Holbrook, who had played in the Cape League in 1992 for Chatham.[77][78] Holbrook's squad dropped the 1997 finals series to Wareham,[79][80] a team that starred a familiar face: league MVP and CCBL Hall of Famer Carlos Peña, who had played for Harwich the previous season.[67]

Notable players during the 1990s included Kevin Millar, a future Boston Red Sox fan favorite and member of the 2004 World Series team that ended the Red Sox' 86-year title drought. The Mariners also boasted the league's Outstanding Pitcher Award winner for three consecutive seasons with Eddie Yarnall (1995), Billy Coleman (1996) and Brent Hoard (1997).

In 1998, a new scoreboard was installed at Whitehouse Field, a donation of former Major League Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent, Jr. in memory of his father, Fay Vincent, Sr. The Commissioner had been a longtime summer resident of Harwich and a fan of the Mariners and the CCBL, and wished to honor his late father who had been the baseball captain at Yale University in 1931.[81] The scoreboard was dedicated on July 6, 1998 as part of "Fay Vincent Night at Whitehouse Field",[82] and was billed by the CCBL as being "the largest scoreboard in New England south of Fenway Park."[83] The 1998 Mariners were skippered by CCBL Hall of Famer Billy Best, who had played for Falmouth in 1979 where he set a CCBL record with his 32-game hitting streak.[54]

CCBL All-League catcher Tommy Medica hit .352 during Harwich's 2008 championship season.
CCBL All-League catcher Tommy Medica hit .352 during Harwich's 2008 championship season.

The 2000s and the end of a long drought

The 2004 Mariners featured CCBL Hall of Famer Craig Hansen, a hard-throwing closer who recorded a perfect 0.00 ERA with 41 strikeouts in 22.1 innings of work.[84] Other notable players during the decade included the 2002 CCBL Outstanding Relief Pitcher Award winner Shaun Marcum, and future major league all-star and Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum of the 2005 Mariners.[85] The 2003 Mariners battled Orleans at Eldredge Park in a 20-inning marathon that set the record as the longest game in modern-era CCBL history. Harwich pushed across the go-ahead run in the top of the 20th, and second baseman Tug Hulett took the mound and recorded the save for the Mariners in the 5 hour, 52 minute affair.[86] The Mariners' playoff drought continued well into the 2000s, as the team reached the postseason only once during the 20-year span from 1988 to 2007.

The Mariners' woes ended in 2008. The club featured future major league all-stars Brandon Belt and DJ LeMahieu, as well as one of the CCBL's top hitters, Tommy Medica, who batted .352 for the season. The Mariners opened the postseason with a two-game sweep of Orleans in the semi-finals,[87][88] then faced Cotuit in the title series. After going on the road and pounding the Kettleers, 11–2, in Game 1,[89] Harwich returned home for Game 2 with ideas of a sweep. Over 6,000 fans packed Whitehouse Field for the second game, but the series seemed headed back to Cotuit as the visitors took a 1–0 lead into the bottom of the ninth. A leadoff triple by Joe Sanders revived the Mariners' hopes, and with the bases loaded on a walk and hit batsman, skipper Steve Englert brought in pinch-hitter Mark Fleury. No stranger to late-inning heroics, Fleury had secured the East Division's 8–6 win in the CCBL All-Star Game with a two-run eighth-inning homer earlier in the season. Fleury rewarded Englert's confidence by coming through again, delivering Harwich's first league championship in 21 years with a 2-run walk-off poke to right-centerfield. For his clutch pinch-hit, Fleury was named playoff co-MVP with Jason Stidham, who had driven in seven runs for Harwich in Game 1 of the title series.[90][91][92]

Luke Voit of the 2011 CCBL champion Mariners
Luke Voit of the 2011 CCBL champion Mariners

The 2010s: Englert's boys win another one

Throughout the 2010s, Harwich continued to be piloted by Steve Englert, the longest-tenured manager in team history.[93][94] The club reached the playoffs in eight of ten years in the decade, finishing first in the East Division three times.

Englert's 2011 squad was led by CCBL East Division All-Star Game starting pitcher Taylor Rogers, along with fellow all-stars Luke Voit at catcher, slugger Jabari Henry,[95] and CCBL Hall of Fame reliever Chris Overman.[96][97] As the playoffs began, the Mariners got a scare, with Brewster taking Game 1 of the first round series,[98] but Harwich bounced back with an 8–2 Game 2 rout.[99] The Mariners went down 2–0 early to the Whitecaps in Game 3, but scratched their way back behind 5.1 innings of scoreless relief by Eddie Butler,[100] and Overman came on to get the final two outs to clinch the series with a 3–2 Harwich victory.[101] In the East Division finals, the Mariners faced Y-D. After a Game 1 shutout of the Red Sox at home, Harwich sent Rogers to the mound with hopes of ending the series in Game 2 at Red Wilson Field. Rogers didn't disappoint, allowing only two Y-D hits through eight innings. Austin Nola homered for the Mariners, and Overman came in with runners on base in the ninth to close the door on the 4–2 Harwich victory to complete the series sweep.[102]

In the 2011 title series, Harwich faced West Division champ Falmouth. The Mariners took Game 1 of the championship at home in a closely contested 5–4 game decided by first baseman John Wooten's go-ahead homer in the sixth. Wooten blasted another one in Game 2 at Falmouth, and the game went to the bottom of the ninth with Harwich leading, 7–5. With the title just three outs away, Englert brought in Overman to try to close out the Commodores in the final frame. Overman, who had not allowed an earned run in 28.1 innings during the season, proceeded to load the bases with no outs, but wiggled out of the jam by getting Falmouth's hot-hitting Reid Redman to pop out, then striking out the next batter, and finishing the job with a popout to the catcher to secure the Mariners' championship. Playoff MVP honors went to Mariner Mike Garza, who went 5-for-9 in the championship series.[103][104][105]

Notable players during the 2010s included 2012 league MVP Phil Ervin, who batted .323 with 11 homers for the Mariners,[106] CCBL Hall of Famer Ian Happ, a two-time CCBL all-star in 2013 and 2014,[107] and 2016 league MVP Ernie Clement, a second baseman who hit .353 on the season.[108] Harwich boasted the league's home run derby champs in 2012 and 2014 as JaCoby Jones and Sal Annunziata claimed the honors.[109][110] Massachusetts native and multi-sport athlete Pat Connaughton pitched briefly for Harwich in 2013, and went on to a career in the National Basketball Association.[111] Another multi-sport athlete, Kyler Murray of the University of Oklahoma, played for Harwich in 2017 and went on to win the Heisman Trophy in 2018.[112][113] In a season highlighted by a regular season no-hitter by Jacob Palisch,[114] and a playoff combined no-hitter against Chatham by hurlers Connor McCullough and Joe Boyle,[115] the Mariners finished the 2019 regular season with only a .500 record, but cruised to the league championship series with playoff sweeps of Chatham and Y-D before being bounced in the finals by Cotuit.[116][117]

The 2020s

The 2020 CCBL season was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.[118] The 2021 Mariners boasted the league's MVP as well as its Outstanding Pitcher as third baseman Brock Wilken and hurler Trey Dombroski took home the awards.[119][120][121]

CCBL Hall of Fame inductees

CCBL Hall of Famer Joe Magrane.
CCBL Hall of Famer Joe Magrane.
CCBL Hall of Famer Craig Hansen
CCBL Hall of Famer Craig Hansen

The CCBL Hall of Fame and Museum is a history museum and hall of fame honoring past players, coaches, and others who have made outstanding contributions to the CCBL.[122] Below are the inductees who spent all or part of their time in the Cape League with Harwich.

Year Inducted Ref. Name Position
2001 [61] Fred Ebbett Manager
2003 [67] Carlos Peña Player
Cory Snyder Player
2005 [66] Pat Pacillo Player
2007 [73] Scott Hemond Player
2009 [47] Lou Lamoriello Player
Joe Magrane Player
2010 [50] Peter Ford Player / Executive
Mike Loggins Player
Casey Close Player
2011 [72] Scott Kamieniecki Player
2012 [54] John Carroll Manager
Billy Best Manager
2013 [51] Ed Drucker Player
2018 [84] Craig Hansen Player
2019 [97] Chris Overman Player
2022 [107] Ian Happ Player

Notable alumni

Kevin Millar
Josh Donaldson
J. A. Happ
Sean Doolittle
Aaron Nola

See also: Harwich Mariners players

Yearly results

Frank Skaff was an all-league outfielder for Harwich's 1933 title club, and went on to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Frank Skaff was an all-league outfielder for Harwich's 1933 title club, and went on to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Harwich's Bill Barrett led the Cape League with a .440 batting average in 1937.
Harwich's Bill Barrett led the Cape League with a .440 batting average in 1937.
CCBL Hall of Famer Lou Lamoriello played for Harwich in 1961 and 1962
CCBL Hall of Famer Lou Lamoriello played for Harwich in 1961 and 1962
Mike Barlow played for Harwich in 1969
Mike Barlow played for Harwich in 1969
CCBL Hall of Famer Pat Pacillo of Harwich's 1983 league champs
CCBL Hall of Famer Pat Pacillo of Harwich's 1983 league champs
Gary DiSarcina played on the 1987 Mariners championship team
Gary DiSarcina played on the 1987 Mariners championship team
CCBL Hall of Famer Carlos Peña played for Harwich in 1996
CCBL Hall of Famer Carlos Peña played for Harwich in 1996
Tim Lincecum pitched for the Mariners in 2005
Tim Lincecum pitched for the Mariners in 2005
Brandon Belt won a CCBL championship with Harwich in 2008
Brandon Belt won a CCBL championship with Harwich in 2008
Brian Goodwin of the 2010 Harwich club
Brian Goodwin of the 2010 Harwich club
2012 Harwich Mariner Trey Mancini
2012 Harwich Mariner Trey Mancini

Results by season, 1927–1939

Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish Postseason* Manager Ref
1927 16 20 4th League Frank Davies [123][124][13][125]
1928 22 22 3rd League Robert Cushman [126][127]
1929 23 21 2nd League Johnny Mitchell [128][129]
1930 17 27 6th League Lucius "Jeff" Jones [130]
1931 17 31 6th League Lucius "Jeff" Jones [131]
1932 21 13 2nd League Joe Harraghy [132][133]
1933 31 18 3rd League (A)
1st League (B)
Won championship (Falmouth) Joe Harraghy [134][135]
[136]
1934 20 27 5th League Mike Welch [137]
1935 16 30 4th League (A)
2nd League (B)
George Colbert [138][139]
[140]
1936 23 25 3rd League (A)
3rd League (B)
Bill Boehner [141][142]
1937 27 19 2nd League Neil Mahoney [143]
1938 31 23 2nd League Neil Mahoney [36]
1939 32 21 2nd League (A)
2nd League (B)
Marty McDonough [144]

* During the CCBL's 1923–1939 era, postseason playoffs were a rarity. In most years, the regular season pennant winner was simply crowned as the league champion.
However, there were four years in which the league split its regular season and crowned separate champions for the first (A) and second (B) halves. In two of those
seasons (1936 and 1939), a single team won both halves and was declared overall champion. In the other two split seasons (1933 and 1935), a postseason
playoff series was contested between the two half-season champions to determine the overall champion.
Played from 1927 to 1929 as combined "Chatham-Harwich" team

Results by season, 1946–1962

Harwich
Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish* Postseason Manager Ref
1946 Won semi-finals (Barnstable)
Lost championship (Falmouth)
Charley Jones [39][145][146]
1947 Lost semi-finals (Orleans) Jim Baldwin [147]
1948 Jim Baldwin
1949
1950 28 14 2nd Lower Cape Division [148]
1951 24 12 3rd Lower Cape Division (A)
T-2nd Lower Cape Division (B)
[149][150]
1952
1953 13 22 4th Lower Cape Division (A)
5th Lower Cape Division (B)
[151][152]
1954
1955 14 16 5th Lower Cape Division Francis Hibbert [153]
1956 11 23 5th Lower Cape Division [154]
1957 12 25 5th Lower Cape Division [155]
1958 10 20 5th Lower Cape Division [156]
1959 18 12 2nd Lower Cape Division Lost round 1 (Orleans) [157]
1960 17 15 2nd Lower Cape Division (T) Won round 1 (Orleans)
Lost semi-finals (Yarmouth)
[158][159]
1961 14 17 4th Lower Cape Division Lost round 1 (Yarmouth) Francis Hibbert [160]
1962 13 17 2nd Lower Cape Division (T) Won round 1 (Orleans)
Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Lost championship (Cotuit)
Dave Gavitt [161][162][163][164]
Cape Verdeans (1949–1950)
Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish* Postseason Manager Ref
1949
1950 5 34 8th Lower Cape Division [148]

* Regular seasons split into first and second halves are designated as (A) and (B).

Results by season, 1963–present

Year Won Lost Tied Regular Season Finish Postseason Manager
1963 12 21 0 4th Lower Cape Division Don Stanford
1964 12 18 0 4th Lower Cape Division Ray Yetten
1965 10 23 0 4th Lower Cape Division Ray Yetten
1966 18 16 0 3rd Lower Cape Division Tony Williams
1967 13 26 0 4th Lower Cape Division Tony Williams
1968 26 13 0 1st Lower Cape Division Lost championship (Falmouth) John Carroll
1969 18 25 0 4th Lower Cape Division John Carroll
1970 11 28 0 7th League Don Stanford
1971 11 30 1 8th League Fred Ebbett
1972 16 25 1 5th League Fred Ebbett
1973 15 25 2 7th League George Woodworth
1974 21 20 1 3rd League Lost semi-finals (Orleans) George Woodworth
1975 15 25 2 7th League Fred Ebbett
1976 20 22 0 5th League Fred Ebbett
1977 18 22 1 5th League Fred Ebbett
1978 20 20 2 3rd League Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Lost championship (Hyannis)
Don Prohovich
1979 21 20 0 3rd League Won semi-finals (Cotuit)
Lost championship (Hyannis)
Don Prohovich
1980 14 27 1 7th League Don Prohovich
1981 23 17 2 2nd League Lost semi-finals (Orleans) Don Prohovich
1982 17 24 0 7th League Don Prohovich
1983 24 17 1 3rd League Won semi-finals (Wareham)
Won championship (Cotuit)
Steve Ring
1984 27 15 0 1st League Lost semi-finals (Wareham) Steve Ring
1985 22 18 2 3rd League Lost semi-finals (Cotuit) Steve Ring
1986 18 24 0 6th League Steve Ring
1987 26 15 0 1st League Won semi-finals (Cotuit)
Won championship (Y-D)
Bill Springman
1988 21 22 0 3rd East Division Mike Kinnersley
1989 19 24 1 4th East Division Mike Kinnersley
1990 22 21 1 4th East Division Fran O'Brien
1991 11 33 0 5th East Division Robin Dreizler
1992 20 23 1 3rd East Division Steve Ring
1993 11 31 1 5th East Division Jay Kemble
1994 16 25 2 5th East Division Bruce Peddie
1995 15 27 1 5th East Division Jay Kemble
1996 20 22 2 3rd East Division Mike Maack
1997 22 22 0 1st East Division Won semi-finals (Chatham)
Lost championship (Wareham)
Chad Holbrook
1998 23 21 0 3rd East Division Billy Best
1999 17 27 0 5th East Division Scott Lawler
2000 21 21 2 4th East Division Buddy Custer
2001 19 25 0 4th East Division Buddy Custer
2002 21 23 0 4th East Division Buddy Custer
2003 21 22 1 4th East Division (T) Steve Englert
2004 20 24 0 5th East Division Steve Englert
2005 21 23 0 3rd East Division Steve Englert
2006 20 24 0 5th East Division Steve Englert
2007 14 28 2 5th East Division Steve Englert
2008 24 20 0 2nd East Division Won semi-finals (Orleans)
Won championship (Cotuit)
Steve Englert
2009 18 25 1 5th East Division Steve Englert
2010 22 21 1 4th East Division Lost round 1 (Y-D) Steve Englert
2011 24 19 1 2nd East Division Won round 1 (Brewster)
Won semi-finals (Y-D)
Won championship (Falmouth)
Steve Englert
2012 27 16 1 1st East Division Lost round 1 (Orleans) Steve Englert
2013 23 19 2 3rd East Division Lost round 1 (Orleans) Steve Englert
2014 26 16 2 1st East Division Won round 1 (Brewster)
Lost semi-finals (Y-D)
Steve Englert
2015 20 22 2 5th East Division Steve Englert
2016 27 15 2 1st East Division Lost round 1 (Chatham) Steve Englert
2017 15 28 1 5th East Division Steve Englert
2018 18 24 2 3rd East Division Lost round 1 (Chatham) Steve Englert
2019 21 21 2 4th East Division Won round 1 (Chatham)
Won semi-finals (Y-D)
Lost championship (Cotuit)
Steve Englert
2020 Season cancelled due to coronavirus pandemic
2021 19 12 5 2nd East Division Lost semi-finals (Brewster) Steve Englert
2022 17 21 6 4th East Division Lost round 1 (Brewster) Steve Englert

League award winners

CCBL Hall of Famer Cory Snyder was the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect in 1983, bashing a record 22 homers.
CCBL Hall of Famer Cory Snyder was the league's Outstanding Pro Prospect in 1983, bashing a record 22 homers.
Mariner Phil Ervin was league MVP in 2012
Mariner Phil Ervin was league MVP in 2012
Harwich's JaCoby Jones, 2012 CCBL All-Star Game Home Run Derby champ
Harwich's JaCoby Jones, 2012 CCBL All-Star Game Home Run Derby champ
The Pat Sorenti MVP Award
Year Player
1966 Ed Drucker
1986 Scott Hemond
2012 Phil Ervin
2016 Ernie Clement
2021 Brock Wilken
The Robert A. McNeece Outstanding Pro Prospect Award
Year Player
1983 Cory Snyder
1984 Mike Loggins
The BFC Whitehouse Outstanding Pitcher Award
Year Player
1974 Andy Muhlstock
1981 Greg Myers
1982 Scott Murray
1995 Eddie Yarnall*
1996 Billy Coleman
1997 Brent Hoard
2021 Trey Dombroski
The Russ Ford Outstanding Relief Pitcher Award
Year Player
2002 Shaun Marcum*
The Daniel J. Silva Sportsmanship Award
Year Player
1979 Gary Kaczor*
1985 Casey Close*
2014 Anthony Hermelyn
2016 Johnny Adams
The Manny Robello 10th Player Award
Year Player
1994 Matt Quattraro
2008 Andrew Giobbi
2010 Clint Moore
2015 Johnny Adams
2016 Austin Filiere
2018 Andre Lipcius
The John J. Claffey Outstanding New England Player Award
Year Player
2008 Ryan Quigley
The Thurman Munson Award for Batting Champion
Year Player
1986 Scott Hemond (.358)
All-Star Game MVP Award
Year Player
1984 Mike Loggins
1989 Jim Austin
1994 Dan Kurtz
2000 Ryan Stegall
2016 B.J. Myers
All-Star Home Run Hitting Contest Champion
Year Player
2009 Connor Powers
2012 JaCoby Jones
2014 Sal Annunziata
The Star of Stars Playoff MVP Award
Year Player
1987 Charles Nagy
2008 Jason Stidham*
2008 Marc Fleury*
2011 Mike Garza

(*) - Indicates co-recipient

All-Star Game selections

Mariner Glenn Adams homered in the 1967 CCBL All-Star Game.
Mariner Glenn Adams homered in the 1967 CCBL All-Star Game.
Jim Beattie, 1974 CCBL all-star
Jim Beattie, 1974 CCBL all-star
DJ LeMahieu was an all-star for Harwich's 2008 CCBL champs.
DJ LeMahieu was an all-star for Harwich's 2008 CCBL champs.
CCBL Hall of Famer Ian Happ, 2013 and 2014 CCBL all-star
CCBL Hall of Famer Ian Happ, 2013 and 2014 CCBL all-star
2016 CCBL all-star and league MVP Ernie Clement
2016 CCBL all-star and league MVP Ernie Clement
Year Players Ref
1963 Don Antonangeli, Luke Lambeley [165]
1964 Dennis Jensen [166]
1965 Frank Joyal, Ted Mareno [167]
1966 Calvin Fisk, Pete Ford, Ed Drucker, Bob Chandler, Carl Schlender [168]
1967 Calvin Fisk, Joe Lasorsa, Glenn Adams [169]
1968 Pete Ford, Mike Jacobs, John Reid, Fred Levine [170]
1969 Alan Bush, Mike Pazik [171]
1970 Dan Radison [172]
1971 Rex Peters [173]
1972 Dale Lydecker, Frank Zawatski, Doug Corbett [174]
1973 Robin Outwater [175]
1974 Barry Sullivan, Andy Muhlstock, Jim Beattie [176]
1975 Barry Sullivan [177]
1976 Abbey Gladstone, Tom Germano [178]
1977 Larry Brown, Pat Murphy, Gary Masse [179]
1978 Larry Brown, Pat Murphy, Paul Voight, Gerry Davis [180]
1979 Ted Rockwell [181]
1980 John Cerutti [182]
1981 Gary Miller-Jones, Tim Byron, Barry Lyons [183]
1982 Andy Allanson [184]
1983 Cory Snyder, Jay Hunt, Robbie Souza [185]
1984 Casey Close, Mike Loggins, Jeff Gardner, Scott Kamieniecki [186]
1985 Casey Close, Todd Stottlemyre, Brian Meyer [187]
1986 Scott Hemond, Alex Sanchez [188]
1987 Steve Arriete [189]
1988 Rick Hirtensteiner, Brian Ahern, Darryl Scott, John Byington [190][191]
1989 Mike Truschke, Scott Campbell, Chris Martin, James Austin, Steve Wolf [192]
1990 Carmine Cappuccio, Nick Sproviero [193]
1991 Pat Leahy [194][195]
1992 Gerad Cawhorn, Reed Aljian, Terry Harvey, Chuck Kulle [196][197]
1993 Bob Ribinski [198]
1994 Ryan Kane, Dan Kurtz [199][200]
1995 Pat Cutshall, Eddie Ferrer, Ed Yarnall, Josh Potter [201]
1996 Pat Cutshall, Jody Gerut, Billy Coleman [202]
1997 Justin Ross, Jeff Wagner, Jason Trott, Andy Lee, Brent Hoard, Sonny Cortez [203][204]
1998 Rodney Nye, B.J. Green [205]
1999 Charles Bilezikjian, Kevin Zaug [206]
2000 Ryan Stegall, Jason Bartlett, Adam Stern, Rob Moravek [207]
2001 Burney Hutchinson, Joe Saunders, Luke Robertson [208]
2002 Chris Snavely, Mitch Maier, Brad Ziegler, Shaun Marcum, Cesar Nicolas [209]
2003 Brad McCann, Justin Hedrick [210]
2004 Jon Aughey, Ben Copeland, John Slone, Dan Brauer, Craig Hansen [211]
2005 Scott Sizemore, Chris Emanuele, Tim Lincecum, Chad Flack [212]
2006 Antone DeJesus, Tony Watson, Dan Merklinger, Josh Donaldson [213]
2007 Cole Figueroa, Kyle Day, Corey Young, Evan Crawford, Chris Dominguez [214]
2008 Mark Fleury, DJ LeMahieu, Chris Manno, Brian Dupra, J. J. Hoover [215]
2009 Daniel Grovatt, Aaron Meade, Connor Powers [216]
2010 Pratt Maynard, Clint Moore, Levi Michael, Ronnie Richardson, Matty Ott, Braden Kapteyn, Adam Morgan [217]
2011 Taylor Rogers, Jabari Henry, Luke Voit, Chris Overman, Carter Capps, Austin Wilson [218]
2012 Phillip Ervin, David Whitehead, Eric Jagielo, JaCoby Jones, Brian Ragira [219]
2013 Ian Happ, Branden Cogswell, Derek Fisher, Aaron Bummer, Chandler Shepherd, Jalen Beeks [220]
2014 Ian Happ, Kyle Barrett, Anthony Hermelyn, Matt Gonzales, Jacob Evans, Sal Annunziata [221]
2015 Cavan Biggio, Johnny Adams, Adam Pate, Luke Scherzer, Spencer Trayner [222]
2016 Ernie Clement, Joe Dunand, Pavin Smith, B.J. Myers, Hunter Williams, Peter Solomon, Zach Schellenger, Packy Naughton, Shane McCarthy [223]
2017 Cobie Vance, Nick Dalesandro, Tyler Baum [224]
2018 Aaron Schunk, Tanner Morris, Andre Lipcius, Andrew Misiaszek, Tom Sutera [225]
2019 Christian Fedko, Daniel Cabrera, Joe Boyle, Connor McCullough, Will Heflin, Jacob Palisch, Joey Wiemer Jr., Chris Galland, Niko Kavadas [226]
2020 Season cancelled due to coronavirus pandemic
2021 Brock Wilken, Tatem Levins, Pres Cavenaugh, Chris Newell, Carter Putz, Trey Dombroski, Andrew Mosiello, Eric Reyzelman, Owen Coady [227]
2022 Joe Vetrano, Nick Goodwin, Tommy Seidl, Zane Probst, Drew Conover, Brock Wilken [228][229]

Italics - Indicates All-Star Game Home Run Hitting Contest participant (1988 to present)

No-hit games

Year Pitcher Opponent Score Location Notes Ref
1963 Don Antonangeli Yarmouth 4–0 Simpkins Field [230][231]
1967 Joe Lasorsa Yarmouth 2–0 Simpkins Field 5-inning game [230][232]
2016 Peter Solomon Chatham 10–0 Veteran's Field Combined [233]
Zach Schellenger
Tommy DeJuneas
Nick Brown
2018 Zack Hess Bourne 1–0 Whitehouse Field 7-inning game;
Combined
[234]
Kyle Brnovich
Joe La Sorsa
2019 Jacob Palisch Orleans 2–0 Eldredge Park 7-inning game [114]
2019 Connor McCullough Chatham 1–0 Veteran's Field Playoff game;
Combined
[115]
Joe Boyle

Managerial history

Manager Seasons Total Seasons Championship Seasons
Dave Gavitt 1962 1
Don Stanford 1963 1
Ray Yetten 1964–1965 2
Tony Williams 1966–1967 2
John Carroll 1968–1969 2
Don Stanford 1970 1
Fred Ebbett 1971–1972
1975–1977
5
George Woodworth 1973–1974 2
Don Prohovich 1978–1982 5
Steve Ring 1983–1986
1992
5 1983
Bill Springman 1987 1 1987
Mike Kinnersley 1988–1989 2
Fran O'Brien 1990 1
Robin Dreizler 1991 1
Jay Kemble 1993
1995
2
Bruce Peddie 1994 1
Mike Maack 1996 1
Chad Holbrook 1997 1
Billy Best 1998 1
Scott Lawler 1999 1
Buddy Custer 2000–2002 3
Steve Englert 2003–2022 19* 2008, 2011

(*) - Season count excludes 2020 CCBL season cancelled due to coronavirus pandemic.

See also

References

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