The Department of National Health and Welfare (NHW), commonly known as Health and Welfare Canada, was a Canadian federal department established in 1944.

Its advisory body on welfare was the National Council of Welfare.[1] In June 1993, Prime Minister Kim Campbell split the department into two separate entities: Health Canada[2] and Human Resources and Labour Canada (later Human Resources Development Canada).[1]

History

Canada's original Department of Health was created in 1919. It would merge with the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment in 1928 to form the Department of Pensions and National Health. Soon after, the Department of National Health and Welfare would be established in 1944.[3]

In June 1993, Prime Minister Kim Campbell split the department into two separate entities: the portfolio related to health would form Health Canada,[2] while social-development and income-security programs (i.e., the 'welfare' side) would form Human Resources and Labour Canada[1]—which also combined Labour Canada, the employment programs of Employment and Immigration Canada, and the social-development and education programs from the Secretary of State.[4] Within a few months, a new government was elected, after which Human Resources and Labour became known as Human Resources Development Canada.

Ministers of Health and Welfare

No. Minister Term Ministry
1. Brooke Claxton[5] October 18, 1944 - December 11, 1946 under Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King
2. Paul Martin Sr. December 12, 1946 - November 15, 1948
November 15, 1948 - June 20, 1957 under Prime Minister Louis Stephen St. Laurent
* Alfred Johnson Brooks (Acting) June 21, 1957 - August 21, 1957 under Prime Minister John Diefenbaker
3. Jay Waldo Monteith August 22, 1957 - April 21, 1963
4. Judy LaMarsh April 22, 1963 - December 17, 1965 under Prime Minister Lester Bowles Pearson
5. Allan MacEachen December 18, 1965 - April 19, 1968
April 20, 1968 - July 5, 1968 under Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau
6. John C. Munro July 6, 1968 - November 26, 1972
7. Marc Lalonde November 27, 1972 - September 17, 1977
8. Monique Bégin September 18, 1977 - June 3, 1979
9. David Edward Crombie June 4, 1979 - March 2, 1980 under Prime Minister Joe Clark
Monique Bégin (2nd time) March 3, 1980 - June 29, 1984 under Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau
June 30, 1984 - September 16, 1984 under Prime Minister John Turner
10. Jake Epp September 17, 1984 - January 29, 1989 under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney
11. Perrin Beatty January 30, 1989 - April 20, 1991
12. Benoît Bouchard April 21, 1991 - June 24, 1993
13. Mary Collins June 25, 1993 - November 3, 1993 under Prime Minister Kim Campbell
14. Diane Marleau November 4, 1993 - January 24, 1996 under Prime Minister Jean Chrétien
15. David Dingwall January 25, 1996 - July 11, 1996

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Welfare Reforms in Canada - Réformes du bien-être social au Canada". Archived from the original on 2012-05-05.
  2. ^ a b "Senior Services". www.amherstburg-cs.com. Archived from the original on 7 August 2007. Retrieved 15 January 2022.
  3. ^ Cheung-gertler, Jasmin H. 2008 November 26. "Health Canada." The Canadian Encyclopedia (last updated 2014 August 5).
  4. ^ "Human Resources Development Canada Sustainable Development Strategy II." Human Resources Development Canada. 2004 March 10.
  5. ^ "Brian Brooke Claxton | The Canadian Encyclopedia". www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca. Retrieved 2021-01-24.

Further reading