Herb Breau
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Gloucester
In office
1968–1984
Preceded byHédard Robichaud
Succeeded byRoger Clinch
Personal details
Born (1944-12-05) December 5, 1944 (age 77)
Haut Sheila, New Brunswick
Political partyLiberal
CabinetMinister of Fisheries and Oceans (June 30, 1984 - September 16, 1984)
CommitteesChair, Special Committee on the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements (1980-1983)
Chair, Special Committee on North-South Relations (1980-1983)
PortfolioParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce (1972-1973)
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (1974)
Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs (1974-1975)

Herb Breau, PC (born December 5, 1944) is a Canadian businessman and former politician.

Born in Haut-Sheila, New Brunswick, Breau was a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) representing Gloucester from the 1968 election until his defeat in the 1984 election that reduced the Liberal caucus to only 40 MPs.

Breau served as a parliamentary secretary in the 1970s. He served as chairman of the Parliamentary Task Forces on North-South Relations and on Fiscal Federalism in Canada, chairman of the Parliamentary Association of Canada-United States from 1977 to 1981, and a member of the Trilateral Commission from 1981 to 1984.

Breau was appointed to Cabinet as Minister of Fisheries and Oceans when John Turner became Prime Minister of Canada in June 1984. His ministerial career ended just over two months later as a result of the election that defeated the Turner government.

He entered the private sector following the end of his political career, and has most recently been an executive at Syscan International, serving as Acting Chief Executive Officer from 2000 to 2001.

Breau served on the board of governors of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) in the 1990s as an appointee of the federal government.

Breau currently serves on the board of directors of the Pearson Centre for Progressive Policy.[1]

Electoral record

1984 Canadian federal election: Gloucester
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Roger Clinch 23,524 55.12 +35.51
Liberal Herb Breau 16,378 38.38 -25.29
New Democratic Valentine Ward 2,188 5.13 -7.71
Independent Fernand Losier 584 1.37
Total valid votes 42,674 100.00
  Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +30.40
1980 Canadian federal election: Gloucester
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Herb Breau 22,229 63.67 +12.06
Progressive Conservative Arthur Savoie 6,846 19.61 -19.33
New Democratic Kevin O'Connell 4,484 12.84 +3.39
Rhinoceros Jules César Boudreau 736 2.11
Rhinoceros Amédé "le Terrible" Boucher 362 1.04
Independent Rose-Hélène Aubé 197 0.56
Marxist–Leninist Gary Zatzman 59 0.17
Total valid votes 34,913 100.00
  Liberal hold Swing +15.7%
1979 Canadian federal election: Gloucester
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Herb Breau 18,387 51.61 -5.44
Progressive Conservative Gastien Godin 13,872 38.94 +15.79
New Democratic Kevin O'Connell 3,366 9.45 +3.51
Total valid votes 35,625 100.00
1974 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Herb Breau 16,195 57.05 +6.44
Progressive Conservative Gérard Arseneau 6,571 23.15 -1.47
Social Credit Lomer Basque 3,935 13.86 -2.12
New Democratic Yvon Guignard 1,685 5.94 +4.08
Total valid votes 28,386 100.00
1972 Canadian federal election: Gloucester
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Herb Breau 14,212 50.61 -4.42
Progressive Conservative Paul Duval 6,914 24.62 -15.81
Social Credit Lomer Basque 4,487 15.98 Ø
Independent Percy W. Cormier 1,109 3.95
Independent Mathilda Blanchard 839 2.99
New Democratic Joe Corbin 521 1.86 -2.68
Total valid votes 28,082 100.00
1968 Canadian federal election: Gloucester
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Herb Breau 12,196 55.03 -5.58
Progressive Conservative Frédéric Arsenault ,8960 40.43 +13.17
New Democratic Florian Robichaud 1,007 4.54 -7.59
Total valid votes 22,163 100.00

References

  1. ^ "Board of Directors". Pearson Centre for Progressive Policy. Retrieved November 17, 2015.