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Highland Light Infantry of Canada Hli badge1
Active1886–1954, 1957–1965
Country Canada
BranchCanadian Militia (1886-1940)
Canadian Army (1940-1954, 1957-1965)
TypeLight Infantry
RoleInfantry
SizeOne battalion
Part ofNon-Permanent Active Militia (1886-1940)
Royal Canadian Infantry Corps (1942-1954, 1957-1965)
Garrison/HQGalt, Ontario
Motto(s)Defence Not Defiance
ColorsFacing colour buff
MarchQuick – Band: "Whistle o'er the Lave o't”
Quick – Pipes: "Sean Triubhas"
EngagementsFirst World War
Second World War
Battle honoursSee #Battle Honours
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Harry Wickwire Foster
Insignia
TartanMacKenzie

The Highland Light Infantry of Canada was an infantry regiment of the Canadian Army. In 1965, the regiment was amalgamated with The Scots Fusiliers of Canada to form The Highland Fusiliers of Canada (now The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada).[1][2][3][4]

Lineage

Perpetuations

The regiment perpetuated the following units:

History

Early history

With the passing of the Militia Act of 1855, the first of a number of newly-raised independent militia companies were established in and around the Waterloo County region of Canada West (now the Province of Ontario).

On 14 September, 1866, the 29th Waterloo Battalion of Infantry was authorized for service by the regimentation of five of these previously authorized independent militia infantry companies. Its Regimental Headquarters was located at Berlin and had companies at New Hamburg, Galt, Waterloo, Crosshill, Berlin and Ayr, Ontario.[1]

On 8 May, 1900, the 29th Waterloo Battalion of Infantry was Reorganized and Redesignated as the 29th Waterloo Regiment and in 1912, the regiment had its Regimental Headquarters relocated to Galt, Ontario.[1][3][6]

The First World War

When the Great War broke out in August 1914, the 29th Waterloo Regiment was not mobilized for active service. However, when the Canadian Expeditionary Force was raised for service overseas, the 29th Regiment would contribute a contingent to help form the 1st Battalion (Ontario Regiment), CEF along with other regiments from the Canadian Militia’s Military District 1 of Western Ontario.[7]

On 15 April, 1915, while still serving within Canada in the home defence role, the 29th Waterloo Regiment was Redesignated as the 29th Regiment (Highland Light Infantry of Canada).[1]

On 7 November, 1914, the 34th Battalion, CEF was authorized for service and on 23 October, 1915, the battalion embarked for Great Britain. After its arrival in the UK, the battalion provided reinforcements to the Canadian Corps in the field. On 27 November, 1916, the battalion was Reorganized as the 34th Boys Battalion, CEF. On 17 July, 1917, the 34th Battalion, CEF was disbanded.[2]

On 22 December, 1915, the 111th Battalion (South Waterloo), CEF was authorized for service and on 25 September, 1916, the battalion embarked for Great Britain. On 13 October 1916, the battalion’s personnel were absorbed by the 35th Battalion, CEF to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field. On 21 May, 1917, the 111th Battalion (South Waterloo), CEF was disbanded.[2]

1920s-1930s

On 29 March, 1920, as a result of the Otter Commission and the following post-war reorganization of the militia, the 29th Regiment (Highland Light Infantry of Canada) was Redesignated as The Highland Light Infantry of Canada and was Reorganized with 2 battalions (1 of them a paper-only reserve battalion) to perpetuate the assigned war-raised battalions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.[3][8]

The Second World War

On 24 May, 1940, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada mobilized The Highland Light Infantry of Canada, CASF for active service. On 7 November, 1940, the battalion was Redesignated as the 1st Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada, CASF and on 20 July, 1941, the battalion embarked for Great Britain. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, the battalion landed in Normandy, France as part of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. On 15 January, 1946, the overseas battalion was disbanded.[2]

On 1 June, 1945, the regiment subsequently mobilized the 3rd Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada, CIC, CAOF for active service with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany. On 1 May, 1946, the battalion was disbanded.[2]

Post War

On 1 October, 1954, as a result of the Kennedy Report on the Reserve Army, this regiment was amalgamated with The Perth Regiment to form The Perth and Waterloo Regiment (Highland Light Infantry of Canada). However, on 1 April, 1957, as a result of the Anderson Report on the Canadian Army (Militia), both regiments were unamalgamated and again resumed their individual regimental identities as both The Perth Regiment and The Highland Light Infantry of Canada respectively.[1][2][9][10]

On February 26, 1965, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada was Amalgamated again, this time with The Scots Fusiliers of Canada and was renamed The Highland Fusiliers of Canada (now The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada).[1][2]

At the time of its Amalgamation with The Scots Fusiliers of Canada, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada held its final order of precedence as 17.

Organization

29th Waterloo Battalion of Infantry (14 September, 1866)

The Highland Light Infantry of Canada (01 April, 1920)

The Highland Light Infantry of Canada (15 September, 1921)

Alliances

Uniform

The regiment were initially kitted with a green Glengarry, trews and scarlet doublet, but became kilted in 1935. Pipers and bandsmen wore a feather bonnet, red hackle, black sporran with three white points, MacKenzie hose for the pipers and red and white for the regiment, and a blue Balmoral bonnet with a diced border, green tourie and red and white hackle.[4]

Battle Honours

Infantrymen of the Highland Light Infantry of Canada aboard a landing craft en route to France on D-Day. LCI(L) 306th of the 2nd Canadian (262nd RN) Flotilla

Battle honours in small capitals are awarded for participation in large operations and campaigns, while those in lowercase indicate honours granted for more specific battles. Battle honours in bold type are authorized to be emblazoned on regimental colours.

The Great War

The Second World War

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Guide to Sources Relating to the Canadian Militia (Infantry, Cavalry, Armored)" (PDF). Library and Archives Canada.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Defence, National (6 November 2018). "The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada". www.canada.ca. Retrieved 29 December 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "The Highland Light Infantry of Canada". 31 October 2007. Archived from the original on 31 October 2007. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  4. ^ a b c d Barnes, Major R.M. (1972). The Uniforms and History of the Scottish Regiments (First Sphere Books edition, 1972 ed.). London: Sphere Books Limited.
  5. ^ "CEF Infantry Battalions" (PDF). Library and Archives Canada.
  6. ^ Luscombe, Stephen. "The British Empire, Imperialism, Colonialism, Colonies". www.britishempire.co.uk. Retrieved 7 August 2022.
  7. ^ "1st Canadian Division". www.canadiansoldiers.com. Retrieved 7 August 2022.
  8. ^ "Otter Committee". www.canadiansoldiers.com. Retrieved 7 August 2022.
  9. ^ "Kennedy Board". www.canadiansoldiers.com. Retrieved 7 August 2022.
  10. ^ "Anderson Report". www.canadiansoldiers.com. Retrieved 7 August 2022.

Bibliography