In baseball statistics, hits per run (H/R), also known as hit conversion rate[1] (HCR) is the ratio between hits and runs scored. It is the average number of hits it takes to score a run. H/R is the measure of the effectiveness of hitting in scoring a run. Teams having a lower hits-to-run ratio would likely have a good offense and could be expected to win more games.

For example, the 1927 New York Yankees, who had a record of 110–44 and are considered one of the greatest teams in Major League Baseball (MLB) history,[2][3][4] had 1644 hits and scored 976 runs—a ratio of 1.68 hits per runs.[5] Conversely, the 1916 Philadelphia Athletics, who had a record of 36–117 and are considered one of the worst teams,[6] had 1212 hits and scored 447 runs—a ratio of 2.71 hits per run.[7]

Between 2008 and 2017, the average hits-to-run ratio in MLB (based on total hits and runs made by all teams during each regular season) varied between 1.87 (2017) and 2.08 (2013),[8] meaning that it generally takes MLB teams about two hits to score a run.

References

  1. ^ "MLB. Hits per Run, 2016". unconventionalstats.com. October 14, 2016. Archived from the original on May 10, 2018 – via Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ "Tom Verducci's Top 10 Teams of All Time". SportsIllustrated.com https://www.si.com/mlb/photos/2010/03/30tom-verduccis-top-10-teams-of-all-time/1
  3. ^ "The Best Major League Baseball Team Ever from 1902–2005". BaseballAlmanac.com. http://www.baseball-almanac.com/articles/best_major_league_teams_ever.shtml
  4. ^ Bryson, Bill (2013), One Summer: America 1927, Doubleday, ISBN 978-0767919401, OCLC 841198242
  5. ^ "1927 New York Yankees Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  6. ^ Pahigian, Josh (2010). The Seventh Inning Stretch: Baseball's Most Essential and Inane Debates. Guilford, Connecticut: Globe Pequot Press. ISBN 978-1-59921-805-2. p. 151
  7. ^ "1916 Philadelphia Athletics Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  8. ^ "How many hits does it take each MLB team to score a run?". halftimewithhambone.com. April 14, 2018. Retrieved November 14, 2020.