Horus cippus
Horus cippus

The Horus on the Crocodiles or Horus cippus or Horus stele is a group of ancient Egyptian amulets, or healing statues, from the Third Intermediate Period until the end of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Well known specimens include the so-called Metternich stela (MET Museum), the Banobal stele and Djedhor healing statue (Egyptian Museum in Cairo) and the Priest of Bastet status (Louvre).[1][2][3]

The Horus cippus usually takes the form of a stone slab depicting god Horus in the form of a child (Harpocrates) standing on two crocodiles and holding other dangerous animals such as snakes and scorpions. In older specimens, the head of the protective god Bes is depicted above the child's figure, protruding from the body of the cippa, which later became part of the frame. The stelae contain Egyptian hieroglyphs with mythological and magical texts recited in the treatment of diseases and for protection against bites, stings or bites.[4] This portrayal is thought to follow the myth of Horus triumphing over dangerous animals in the marshes of Khemmis (Akhmim).[5][1]

Gallery of notable depictions

Bibliography

Broad

Individual steles

References

  1. ^ a b Seele 1947.
  2. ^ Lacau, Pierre (1921). "Les statues «guérisseuses » dans l'ancienne Égypte". Monuments et mémoires de la Fondation Eugène Piot. 25 (1): 189–210. doi:10.3406/piot.1921.1824.
  3. ^ [1], UCL
  4. ^ Hotabi, H.S.E.; Sternberg-El-Hotabi, H. (1999). Untersuchungen zur Überlieferungsgeschichte der Horusstelen: ein Beitrag zur Religionsgeschichte Ägyptens im 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr. Untersuchungen zur Überlieferungsgeschichte der Horusstelen: ein Beitrag zur Religionsgeschichte Ägyptens im 1. Jahrtausend v. Chr (in German). Harrassowitz. ISBN 978-3-447-04132-4. Retrieved 2022-04-18.
  5. ^ Gay., Robins (2008). The art of ancient Egypt (Rev. ed.). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. p. 244. ISBN 9780674030657. OCLC 191732570.