Howard Hancock
Hancock pictured in The Index 1932, Illinois State yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1894-12-20)December 20, 1894
Shullsburg, Wisconsin
DiedFebruary 12, 1978(1978-02-12) (aged 83)
Colfax, Illinois
Alma materUniversity of Wisconsin (1918)
Indiana University[1]
Playing career
Football
1916–1917Wisconsin
Baseball
c. 1917Wisconsin
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1921–1928Oshkosh State
1930Oshkosh State
1931–1944Illinois State
Baseball
1933–1946Illinois State
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1921–1931Oshkosh State
1931–1963Illinois State
Head coaching record
Overall95–65–29 (football)
120–112–2 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
2 INACW (1923)
3 IIAC (1937, 1940–1941)

Howard Joseph Hancock (December 20, 1894 – February 12, 1978) was an American football and baseball coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Oshkosh State Normal School—now known as the University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh from 1921 to 1928 and again in 1930 and at Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois from 1931 until 1944, and compiling a career college football coaching record of 95–65–29. Hancock was the head baseball coach at Illinois State from 1933 to 1946, tallying a mark of 120–112–2, and also coached golf at the school. He was the athletic director at Oshkosh State from 1921 to 1931 and Illinois State from 1931 to 1961. Hancock Stadium, the home venue for the Illinois State Redbirds football team is named for him.

Hancock was born on December 20, 1894, in Shullsburg, Wisconsin. He was captain of the football team at the University of Wisconsin–Madison before graduating in 1918. Hancock died on February 12, 1978 while visiting his wife at the Octavia Manor Nursing Home in Colfax, Illinois.[2]

Including his records from other schools, Hancock leads college football with the highest tie percentage in varsity play.[3][4]

Head coaching record

Football

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Oshkosh State Titans (Inter-Normal Athletic Conference of Wisconsin / Wisconsin State Teachers College Conference) (1921–1928)
1921 Oshkosh State 5–2 3–1 2nd
1922 Oshkosh State 4–1–3 3–1–3 3rd
1923 Oshkosh State 7–0 5–0 1st
1924 Oshkosh State 5–3 3–2 5th
1925 Oshkosh State 5–2–1 3–0–1 2nd
1926 Oshkosh State 3–3–1 2–1–1 T–4th
1927 Oshkosh State 2–3–1 1–2–1 7th
1928 Oshkosh State 5–1–2 3–0–2 T–3rd
Oshkosh State Titans (Wisconsin State Teachers College Conference) (1930)
1930 Oshkosh State 2–4–2 2–2–1 5th
Oshkosh State: 38–19–10 25–9–9
Illinois State Redbirds (Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference) (1931–1944)
1931 Illinois State 1–6–1 1–6–1 20th
1932 Illinois State 7–2 6–2 4th
1933 Illinois State 6–3 5–2 9th
1934 Illinois State 2–4–2 2–3–2 12th
1935 Illinois State 5–2–2 4–2–1 T–7th
1936 Illinois State 3–4–2 2–3–1 13th
1937 Illinois State 5–1–2 4–0–2 T–1st
1938 Illinois State 5–4–1 4–1 3rd
1939 Illinois State 4–2–3 3–0–2 2nd
1940 Illinois State 5–3–1 4–0 1st
1941 Illinois State 3–4–2 3–1 T–1st
1942 Illinois State 2–5–1 2–1–1 3rd
1943 Illinois State 6–2–1 1–0 NA
1944 Illinois State 3–4–1 1–0 2nd
Illinois State: 57–46–19 42–21–10
Total: 95–65–29
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ "The Index". Illinois State Normal University, Normal IL. 1945.
  2. ^ "ISU hall of famer, coach dies at 83". The Pantagraph. Bloomington, Illinois. February 13, 1978. p. 2. Retrieved July 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  3. ^ "NCAA Coaching Records" (PDF). NCAA. 2008. pp. 189, 192.
  4. ^ "All-Time Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved June 20, 2010.