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The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has published four sets of rules to standardize chemical nomenclature.

There are two main areas:

Use

IUPAC nomenclature is used for the naming of chemical compounds, based on their chemical composition and their structure. For example, one can deduce that 1-chloropropane has a Chlorine atom on the first carbon in the 3-carbon propane chain.

See also