Ian Kennedy
Kennedy pitching for the Kansas City Royals in 2016
Philadelphia Phillies – No. 31
Pitcher
Born: (1984-12-19) December 19, 1984 (age 36)
Huntington Beach, California
Bats: Right
Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 1, 2007, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
(through 2021 season)
Win–loss record100–106
Earned run average4.10
Strikeouts1,710
Saves56
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Ian Patrick Kennedy[1] (born December 19, 1984) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the New York Yankees, Arizona Diamondbacks, San Diego Padres, Kansas City Royals and Texas Rangers.

After honing a fastball from a young age, Kennedy was a standout for La Quinta High School in Westminster, California, and was selected by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 2003 MLB Draft. Kennedy turned down the Cardinals' offer in order to play college baseball for the University of Southern California. He was the USC Trojans' top-of-the-rotation starting pitcher as a freshman and was named the Pac-10 Pitcher of the Year as a sophomore. Though he slumped in his junior year, the Yankees selected Kennedy 21st overall in the 2006 MLB Draft. He quickly rose through the Yankees' farm system, making his major league debut the year after he signed with the team. Kennedy spent parts of three seasons with the Yankees, missing most of the 2009 season with an aneurysm in his arm.

The Yankees traded Kennedy to the Diamondbacks in December 2009, and he quickly became the team's ace: after posting a 9–10 win–loss record in 2010, Kennedy was the National League wins leader in 2011. After making three consecutive opening day starts for Arizona, Kennedy was traded to the Padres at the 2013 trade deadline. He spent two strong seasons in San Diego before a hamstring issue soured his 2015 performance. He opted to become a free agent at the end of the year, then signed with the Royals. Injuries continued to plague him until the Royals moved him to the bullpen for the 2019 season. Although he was initially displeased with the decision, he found a new role as the team's closer, recording a league-leading 30 saves that season.

Kennedy signed with the Rangers in 2021. He had expected to serve as the team's setup man but repeated his performance as closer after a series of injuries befell the bullpen. At the trade deadline, Kennedy and Kyle Gibson were part of a package sent to the Phillies in exchange for Spencer Howard.

Early life

Kennedy was born on December 19, 1984, in Huntington Beach, California.[1] From a young age, he was known for his natural pitching talent, particularly in finding his target with a fastball.[2] Kennedy began gaining a reputation as a power pitcher when he was a freshman at La Quinta High School in Westminster, California, pitching a five-inning perfect game. As a sophomore, he posted a 10–2 win–loss record with a 1.33 earned run average (ERA).[3] As a junior, he boasted a 0.38 ERA and recorded 168 strikeouts in 90+13 innings pitched, with a fastball speed hovering between 88 and 92 mph (142 and 148 km/h). As a batter, Kennedy also recorded seven home runs and 31 runs batted in (RBIs) that year.[4] He missed most of his senior season with a fractured patella but managed to put up an 8–0 record and a 0.43 ERA in the games that he did play. Kennedy graduated high school in 2003 with a 39–2 record.[5]

Between his junior and senior year of high school, Kennedy played internationally with the 2002 US Junior National Team, with whom he went 1–0 with a 2.77 ERA in 13 innings. Kennedy was tapped as the starting pitcher for the US team's bronze medal match at the 2002 World Junior Baseball Championship, where he took the win with only one earned run and 10 strikeouts in seven innings of work.[6]

College career

The St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB) drafted Kennedy in the 14th round of the 2003 Major League Baseball draft, but he chose not to sign with the team, instead honoring his commitment to play college baseball for the University of Southern California (USC). There, he followed Anthony Reyes as the team's pitching ace.[7] In 2004, he was the first freshman to make the top of the USC starting rotation since Randy Flores had done so in 1994. He pitched 92+23 innings, striking out 120 batters and posting a 7–2 record with a 2.91 ERA. At the end of the year, Kennedy was named to the Baseball America Freshman All-America Team.[8] That summer, he helped take the US College National Team to a gold medal at the World University Baseball Championship, putting up a 3–1 record with a 3.81 ERA and leading the team with 40 strikeouts. Kennedy was credited with the win in the championship match against Japan, where he took a no-hitter into the eighth inning.[9]

USC baseball coach Mike Gillespie opened the 2005 season with the intention of using Kennedy up to three times a week, pitching on Fridays, Sundays, and Tuesdays to limit the damage of the school's dearth of starting pitchers. Pitching coach Dave Lawn, meanwhile, focused on improving Kennedy's command and stamina, which would allow him to pitch deeper into each game.[10] His sophomore year turned into a breakout season for Kennedy, who went 12–2 with a 2.54 ERA, earned consensus All-American honors, and helped lead the Trojans through the first round of the 2005 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament.[11] Ultimately, however, the Trojans fell to Oregon State at the Corvallis Super Regional and were eliminated from the tournament.[12] Kennedy, meanwhile, was named the Pac-10 Conference Pitcher of the Year after striking out 95 batters in his first 67+13 innings.[13]

Going into the 2006 college baseball season, USC lost many staples of its rotation to the MLB draft, including catcher Jeff Clement and third baseman Billy Hart, and Kennedy was called upon to be a leader for the younger members of the team.[14] That February, he came within one out of a no-hitter against Kansas before senior Ritchie Price recorded a hit in the ninth inning.[15] Ultimately, Kennedy could not repeat the success of the previous season, slumping to a 5–7 record with a 3.90 ERA in 2006.[16] Kennedy finished his college baseball career with a 24–12 record and a 3.09 ERA. He came in third at the time for all-time USC strikeouts with 380, and was second in strikeouts per nine innings (K/9) with 10.99.[17]

Professional career

Minor leagues

The New York Yankees selected Kennedy in the first round, 21st overall, of the 2006 Major League Baseball draft. He was the 39th player in USC history to become a first-round MLB draft selection.[18] He signed with the team in mid-August for a $2.25 million signing bonus, roughly $750,000 more than expected for a 21st overall draft selection, and was assigned to the Class A Short-Season Staten Island Yankees of the New York–Penn League.[19] Kennedy made his professional baseball debut on September 6, 2006, pitching 2+23 innings against the Tri-City ValleyCats.[20] After playing one game for Staten Island, Kennedy spent the winter with the West Oahu CaneFires of the Hawaii Winter Baseball league. In nine games there, including seven starts, he posted a 0–2 record and a 4.45 ERA, striking out 45 batters in 30+13 innings.[21]

Following his brief Staten Island outing, Kennedy was assigned to the Class A Tampa Yankees of the Florida State League to begin the 2007 season.[22] In 10 Class A starts, Kennedy posted a 6–1 record with a 1.29 ERA, striking out 72 batters in 63 innings and holding his opponents to a .183 batting average. He received a promotion to the Double-A Trenton Thunder at the start of June and won his Double-A debut against the Binghamton Mets on June 6, 2007.[23] On July 24, Kennedy and his rotation mate Joba Chamberlain were both promoted from Trenton to the Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees. At the time of his promotion, Kennedy led the Yankees' farm system with 129 strikeouts and was tied for first with 11 wins.[24] He made only six starts with Scranton, going 1–1 with a 2.08 ERA and striking out 34 batters in 34+23 innings. Altogether, Kennedy posted a 12–3 minor league record in 2007, with a 1.91 ERA and 163 strikeouts in 25 starts and 146+13 innings.[21]

New York Yankees (2007–2009)

After Mike Mussina lost three starts in a row for the Yankees, recording a 17.69 ERA in the process, Kennedy was called up to take his spot in the rotation at the end of August, becoming the second Yankee that season to climb from Class A to major league ball.[25] He made his major league debut on September 1, 2007, allowing only one earned run in seven innings of an eventual 9–6 victory over the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.[26] After going 1–0 with a 1.89 ERA in his first three major league starts, Kennedy had to be scratched from a scheduled September 22 game against the Toronto Blue Jays because he strained a muscle in his upper back.[27] The injury forced Kennedy to miss the remainder of the season.[1]

Kennedy with the Yankees in 2008
Kennedy with the Yankees in 2008

Rather than acquiring a veteran free agent starting pitcher during the 2007–08 offseason, the Yankees chose to entrust their starting rotation to a trio of young pitchers: Kennedy, Joba Chamberlain, and Phil Hughes.[28] The plan did not work as expected: Kennedy went 0–2 with an 8.37 ERA in his first six games and was optioned to Triple-A on May 4, with Darrell Rasner taking his place at the back of the rotation.[29] After finding success in the International League, including a four-game stretch with a 1.33 ERA, Kennedy was called back up to the Yankees for an emergency start against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim on August 8. He allowed nine hits and five runs and was pulled out of the game in the third inning. Kennedy's major league record for the season fell to 0–4 while his ERA rose to 8.17.[30] It would be his last major league start in the Yankees organization.[31]

Kennedy opened the 2009 season in Triple-A but began feeling numbness in his pitching hand that April. On May 8, he was diagnosed with an aneurysm around his biceps and underwent surgery the following week.[32] He began facing live batters again at the start of September,[33] and from there, Kennedy pitched in six minor-league games, including two starts, for a total of 27+23 innings. He returned to the major leagues on September 20, with manager Joe Girardi intending to utilize Kennedy as a long reliever.[34] Kennedy made his first Yankees appearance in over a year on September 23, walking two batters and hitting another with a pitch during the eighth inning of an eventual 3–2 win over the Angels.[35] Kennedy was subsequently left off of the postseason roster on the Yankees' run to a 2009 World Series championship title.[20] After the season ended, he joined the Surprise Rafters of the Arizona Fall League to make up for the mostly-lost season. Experimenting with developing off-speed pitches, Kennedy had a 4.25 ERA during his fall league stint, putting up a strikeout-to-walk ratio of 5.6 in his 29+23 innings.[36]

Arizona Diamondbacks (2010–2013)

On December 8, 2009, Kennedy was part of a three-team, seven-player trade with the Yankees, Arizona Diamondbacks, and Detroit Tigers. Kennedy, Phil Coke, and prospect Austin Jackson went from New York to Detroit in exchange for All-Star center fielder Curtis Granderson, with Kennedy then flipped to Arizona alongside Edwin Jackson so that the Tigers could acquire Diamondbacks pitchers Max Scherzer and Daniel Schlereth.[37] The Diamondbacks started showing interest in Kennedy when he pitched for the Arizona Fall League,[38] and he earned a position in the Arizona starting rotation by the end of March 2010.[39] The Diamondbacks' player development staff agreed at the start of the season to limit Kennedy's workload to a total of 180 innings, an amount that would help the pitcher extend his durability without pushing him into additional injuries.[40] Kennedy picked up his first win in over two years on April 29, pitching eight innings in the Diamondbacks' 13–5 rout of the Chicago Cubs. Kennedy was able to take a one-run game into the eighth inning before giving up a grand slam to Kosuke Fukudome, and Daniel Stange was called in to pitch a perfect ninth inning for his own MLB debut.[41] On August 26, Kennedy struck out a career-high 12 batters in an 11–5 victory over the San Diego Padres. He cited Arizona's early lead, in which they picked up nine runs in the first 3+13 innings, with helping him relax enough to maintain his command.[42] Kennedy finished his first full major league season with a 9–10 record and a 3.80 ERA in 32 starts, as well as 168 strikeouts in 194 innings. He also walked 70 batters and led MLB with 16 wild pitches.[43]

Kennedy with the Diamondbacks in 2011
Kennedy with the Diamondbacks in 2011

Arizona manager Kirk Gibson tapped Kennedy to serve as the Diamondbacks' opening day starter for the 2011 season, after he went 0–0 with a 7.88 ERA during spring training.[44] Kennedy took two innings to settle into his rhythm, allowing three earned runs in six innings of the eventual 7–6 loss to the Colorado Rockies.[45] After a brief trip to New York to be with his wife and their newborn child, Kennedy pitched his first major league complete game on April 25, outdueling ace Cliff Lee in a 4–0 shutout of the Philadelphia Phillies.[46] He continued to perform well through the summer, building a seven-game winning streak as well as 22 straight starts in which he threw at least 100 pitches. Both of those streaks were broken on August 19, when Kennedy allowed three runs and five hits to the Phillies in three innings.[47] With an eight-inning outing in the 1–0 defeat of the Pittsburgh Pirates on September 19, Kennedy became the first National League pitcher that season to reach 20 wins.[48] Kennedy finished the season with 21 wins, tying Cy Young honoree Clayton Kershaw as the NL win leader.[49] He also ranked among the leaders in the NL with 198 strikeouts, a 2.88 ERA, and 222 innings pitched. Additionally, at no point during the 2011 season did Kennedy lose two or more consecutive starts.[50] Kennedy finished fourth in voting for the 2011 NL Cy Young Award, behind Kershaw, Roy Halladay, and Cliff Lee.[51]

The Diamondbacks' banner season echoed Kennedy's: after finishing last in the NL West during the 2010 season, Arizona clinched the NL West title with a 3–1 victory over the San Francisco Giants on September 23.[52] Kennedy was called upon to start Game 1 of the 2011 National League Division Series against the Milwaukee Brewers, pitching opposite Yovani Gallardo. He was unable to carry his regular season success into the playoffs, giving up four earned runs in 6+23 innings and taking the loss in the 4–1 defeat.[53] Kennedy faced Gallardo again in Game 5, with neither pitcher taking the decision. While John Axford's first blown save for the Brewers took the game into extra innings, the Diamondbacks were eliminated on a walk-off RBI from Nyjer Morgan.[54]

Kennedy picked up his first opening day win in 2012, outpitching Giants ace Tim Lincecum in a 5–4 victory.[55] He struggled early in the season, with a 3–5 record and 4.65 ERA by the start of June, but felt "like [he] got in a nice little groove" against the Giants on June 1, allowing only one run in 7+13 innings.[56] In his next start, after making a "secret" mechanical change to his pitches, Kennedy matched his career high 12 strikeouts in a 10–0 shutout of the Colorado Rockies.[57] That July, he lasted eight innings in two consecutive starts, giving up three runs across the 16 total innings. In the second start, Kennedy also hit his first career triple, clearing the bases in a 6–3 defeat of the Rockies.[58] While his record and ERA dropped to 14–11 and 4.14 during the 2012 season, respectively, Kennedy boasted an 8.0 K/9 ratio for the second year in a row, and maintained a 2.0 Wins Above Replacement for the year.[59]

Kennedy with the Diamondbacks in 2013
Kennedy with the Diamondbacks in 2013

Kennedy once again served as Arizona's opening pitcher for the 2013 season, striking out eight batters and allowing two runs in seven innings of a 6–2 defeat of the St. Louis Cardinals.[60] On June 11, while facing the division rival Los Angeles Dodgers, Kennedy accidentally struck three batters with a pitch. First, he glanced a fastball off of Yasiel Puig's face in the sixth inning. In the next inning, Kennedy struck catcher Miguel Montero in the back. After Kennedy struck pitcher Zack Greinke that same inning, both teams engaged in a benches-clearing brawl, with six players and coaches ejected from the game.[61] Kennedy was suspended for 10 games for what MLB referred to as "intentionally throwing a pitch in the head area of Zack Greinke ... after a warning had already been issued to both clubs".[62] At the time of his suspension, Kennedy was 3–4 with a 5.21 ERA.[63] He returned on June 29, where control problems led to four runs in 4+13 innings and Arizona extended its losing streak to 21 games.[64]

San Diego Padres (2013–2015)

On July 31, 2013, the Diamondbacks traded Kennedy to the San Diego Padres in exchange for relief pitcher Joe Thatcher, relief prospect Matt Stites, and a compensatory pick in the upcoming draft. Padres general manager Josh Byrnes was also the Diamondbacks' general manager when they had acquired Kennedy prior, and he referred to the pitcher as "the first guy I have ever traded for twice".[65] The Padres immediately added Kennedy to their starting rotation, where he joined Andrew Cashner, Tyson Ross, Eric Stults, and Edinson Volquez.[66] After being traded, Kennedy struggled on the road, going 0–2 in his first four away starts with a 6.95 ERA. In his worst outing of the season, Kennedy allowed six runs on eight hits in 3+23 innings against the Pittsburgh Pirates.[67] He posted a 4–2 record and a 4.24 ERA in 10 games with San Diego that season, striking out 55 batters in 57+13 innings.[43]

Going into the 2014 season, Padres manager Bud Black placed Kennedy in the second spot of the starting rotation, between opening day starter Andrew Cashner and No. 3 Tyson Ross.[68] On May 9, while facing the Miami Marlins, Kennedy not only tied his career-high 12 strikeouts as a pitcher, but he hit the first home run of his career, a solo shot against Miami starting pitcher Jacob Turner in the sixth inning.[69] Over the course of the season, Kennedy saw noticeable improvement in his ERA, walks plus hits per innings pitched (WHIP), and strikeout-to-walk ratio over the previous season, which he credited to Black and pitching coach Darren Balsley, the latter of whom taught Kennedy to strengthen his leg kick when pitching to improve his command.[70] Balsley's advice helped Kennedy add an extra mile per hour of velocity to Kennedy's fastball, which now reached speeds of 95 mph (153 km/h) and helped him strike out an average of 9.27 batters per nine innings.[71] On September 27, while facing the San Francisco Giants for his 33rd and final start of the season, Kennedy passed his 200th inning pitched of the season for the third time in his career, and struck out his 200th batter of the season for the first time. He finished the year with a 13–13 record and a 3.63 ERA.[72]

Kennedy with the Padres in 2015
Kennedy with the Padres in 2015

While starting the Padres' 2015 home opener against the Giants, Kennedy had to be taken out of the game in the third inning with a left hamstring strain. He explained later that he had begun to feel pain in the area on the final pitch of the second inning, and that he had asked to be taken out to avoid injuring his arm by altering his pitching mechanics.[73] He returned on April 25 to face the Los Angeles Dodgers, giving up eight hits and eight runs in 4+13 innings while striking out only two batters.[74] The injury set Kennedy off-course at the start of the season, and by the end of May, he had a 7.15 ERA in eight starts. He recovered through the middle part of the season, striking out 93 batters in 16 starts between June and August while holding his opponents to a .229 batting average, but struggled again at the end of the year. In his final six starts of 2015, batters hit .297 against Kennedy, who had a 5.61 ERA in that span.[75] He finished the year with a 9–15 record and a 4.28 ERA but showed considerable improvement in his fastball velocity and in his K/9 ratio, the latter of which was 9.3 for the year.[76]

At the end of the season, the Padres tendered Kennedy a one-year, $15.8 million qualifying offer under the anticipation that he would reject it in search of a multi-year contract elsewhere. Kennedy rejected the offer, becoming a free agent that winter.[76]

Kansas City Royals (2016–2020)

Kennedy with the Royals in 2016
Kennedy with the Royals in 2016

On January 16, 2016, the Kansas City Royals signed Kennedy to a five-year, $70 million contract, with an opt-out clause built in prior to the 2018 season.[77] Kennedy was happy to join the team, which he described as "an easy environment", and particularly enjoyed the reunion with his Yankees pitching coach, Dave Eiland.[78] On the final day of spring training, Kennedy exited the mound shortly before the fourth inning with left hamstring tightness. Manager Ned Yost said that the removal was precautionary for a "slight" injury.[79] Kennedy later took the win in his Royals debut, striking out seven batters in 7+23 innings in a 7–0 shutout of the Minnesota Twins.[80] The Royals could not keep apace of their previous World Series-winning season, however, and on July 25, Kennedy managed to load the bases within six minutes of the first pitch of the game, putting the Royals in a 4–0 deficit out of the gate.[81] He followed this effort by allowing only three runs in four starts, but was not credited with a win between June 26 and August 15. The drought was ultimately broken when Kansas City defeated Detroit 3–1.[82] While Kennedy was mostly happy with his performance during the 2016 season, in which he went 11–11 with a 3.68 ERA and struck out 184 batters in 195+23 innings, he was disappointed that the Royals did not reach the postseason, and his 33 home runs allowed were "a lot more" than he had been "expecting or hoping for".[83]

At the start of the 2017 MLB season, Kennedy served as the Royals' No. 2 starter, behind former reliever Danny Duffy.[84] After going 0–3 with a 3.03 ERA in his first six starts, Kennedy suffered another hamstring injury on May 4, leaving the mound against the Chicago White Sox after 4+13 innings.[85] He returned on May 21, lasting only two innings while walking three batters and giving up a pair of home runs. Kennedy and manager Ned Yost both clarified that the pitcher felt physically fine, and that his command issues were mental.[86] Ultimately, however, the hamstring injury continued to bother Kennedy through the remainder of the season, particularly when he tried to utilize his changeup, historically Kennedy's most effective approach. His 5.38 ERA for the year was Kennedy's worst since 2008, and after returning at the end of May, his opponents boasted a .528 slugging percentage against him.[87] Despite struggling his way to a 5–13 record for the year, Kennedy chose not to opt out of the remainder of his Royals contract, saying that it "would be pretty stupid" to forego the final three years of the agreement.[88]

A number of injuries befell Kennedy during the 2018 season. On April 24, he was hit in the foot with a line drive off the bat of Ryan Braun of the Milwaukee Brewers. Kennedy was able to finish pitching the inning but had to be removed from the game afterwards with a contusion. It was the first time in Kennedy's 274 major league starts that he had not recorded at least one strikeout.[89] Most of Kennedy's summer was taken up with a left oblique strain: he was originally put on the 10-day disabled list for the injury at the end of June, with a return date of July 10. During that attempted start, Kennedy lasted only three innings before a recurrence of the oblique strain forced him off the mound and back onto the disabled list.[90] Kennedy returned to the mound in full on September 9 to pitch six innings against the Minnesota Twins.[91] Injuries limited Kennedy to only 22 starts for the year, in which he went 3–9 with a 4.66 ERA and struck out 105 batters in 119+23 innings.[43]

The injuries that Kennedy had suffered in 2018 worried the Royals, who moved him into the bullpen to start the 2019 MLB season, believing that the decreased innings workload would help Kennedy stay healthy through the season.[92] Kennedy himself was hesitant to make the change, believing that he was capable of another year in the starting rotation, but he ultimately had a successful stint as the Royals' closer.[93] On July 28, Kennedy recorded his 20th save of the year, becoming the sixth pitcher since saves were recorded in 1969 to compile 20 wins and 20 saves in the same season.[94] For the period between May 30 and September 23, Kennedy led MLB with 28 saves, including 19 after the All-Star break, and he noticed a physical improvement to becoming a reliever, in contrast to feeling "like you get hit by a truck every fifth day" as a starting pitcher.[93] Kennedy posted a 3–2 record and a 3.41 ERA for the season, striking out 73 batters in 63+13 innings and successfully converting 30 saves in 34 opportunities.[43]

Upon learning that the 2020 MLB season would be shortened to 60 regular-season games as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Royals manager Mike Matheny decided not to assign any permanent roles like closer or setup man for his bullpen. Instead, he left the option open for dominant relievers like Kennedy to enter games in earlier innings if he believed that they were in a position to change the course of the game.[95] On August 15, Kennedy made his first starting appearance since 2018, pitching the first two innings of a bullpen game against the Minnesota Twins.[96] At the end of the month, he was placed on the injured list when he suffered a left calf strain in the ninth inning of a game against the Chicago White Sox. Kennedy attempted to field a ground ball but began limping afterwards and had to be removed from the game.[97] The injury limited Kennedy to only 15 appearances during the truncated season,[98] during which he posted a 9.00 ERA and a 1.786 WHIP.[43]

Texas Rangers (2021)

On February 23, 2021, Kennedy signed a minor-league contract with the Texas Rangers, a deal which included an invitation to spring training. The Rangers were under new general management from Kennedy's former Royals teammate Chris Young.[99] When Texas released their opening day roster on April 1, Kennedy and fellow spring training invitee Matt Bush were both named to the 25-man roster.[100] The oldest member of the Rangers' bullpen by three years, Kennedy entered the season expecting to serve as the team's setup man, but a series of season-ending injuries to Bush, José Leclerc, and Jonathan Hernández forced the team to turn to Kennedy as their closer. By May, Kennedy had secured nine saves in nine attempts, giving the Rangers the most saves in the American League.[101] As the season progressed, the Rangers rarely held leads late into games, and they had less use for Kennedy as a closer. At the start of June, he had a brief stint on the injured list for a strained hamstring.[102] In his half-season with the Rangers, Kennedy posted a 2.51 ERA and a 1.05 WHIP in 32 appearances, while successfully converting 16 saves in 17 opportunities.[103]

Philadelphia Phillies (2021–present)

Kennedy was part of a trade deadline package deal on July 30, 2021, that sent him, starting pitcher Kyle Gibson, prospect Hans Crouse, and cash considerations to the Philadelphia Phillies in exchange for pitcher Spencer Howard and prospects Kevin Gowdy and Josh Gessner.[104] The Phillies, who had been struggling with both an unreliable bullpen and an injury-riddled starting rotation, acquired Kennedy hoping he would serve as a dependable closer. This allowed acting closer Ranger Suárez to join the rotation.[105]

Pitching style

Kennedy's primary pitch as a starter has always been his four-seam fastball, but he started to gain traction as the Diamondbacks' ace when he learned to selectively incorporate off-speed pitches like a two-seam fastball and a cutter into his repertoire.[36] In 2018, his final year as a starting pitcher, Kennedy utilized five different pitches: a fastball with an average speed of 92 mph (148 km/h), a 78 mph (126 km/h) curveball, an 85 mph (137 km/h) changeup, an 88 mph (142 km/h) cutter, and an 87 mph (140 km/h) slider.[106] The mental care that Kennedy takes when deciding when and which off-speed pitch to throw has drawn comparisons to that of Mike Messina and Greg Maddux, both of whom Kennedy observed when he was developing as a pitcher.[107] Kennedy is also one of several pitchers to utilize a unique changeup grip known as the Vulcan, in which the ball is gripped with a two-finger split reminiscent of the Vulcan salute in Star Trek.[108]

In the bullpen, Kennedy maintains a three-pitch repertoire centered around his fastball, with a changeup and a curveball acting as his off-speed pitches.[109] His average fastball velocity has steadily increased throughout his major league career, and has been at its highest during the 2021 season, where it carried an average velocity of 94.9 mph (152.7 km/h).[110] His off-speed pitches also became faster after Kennedy transitioned to the shorter innings workload required of a reliever: his curveball jumped an average of 3 mph (4.8 km/h) after moving to the bullpen in 2019, while his changeup simultaneously rose by 2.5 mph (4.0 km/h).[111]

Personal life

Kennedy married Allison Jaskowiak, then a member of the USC Trojans women's basketball team, on October 6, 2007, in Kirkwood, Missouri.[112] Many of his Yankees teammates had hoped to attend the wedding, but they wound up being in the midst of an 11-inning playoff game against the Cleveland Indians.[113] Kennedy and Jaskowiak have six children: Nora Rose, Renee Elaine, Lydia Marie, Evelyn Nicole, Isaac Patrick, and Elijah Edward.[1] His daughter Evelyn was born July 31, 2015, two hours before Kennedy was scheduled to start a game against the Miami Marlins. He had planned to return to California when his wife went into labor, but ran into delays and watched the birth over FaceTime in Miami.[114] Isaac, born September 2017, was the couple's first son after four daughters.[115]

While playing for the Padres, Kennedy and his family began inviting the children of United States Navy members to baseball games. After signing with the Royals, he expanded upon this trend: at every home Saturday game, Kennedy would invite members of various military branches to watch the game from a Dugout Suite, where they would receive free food and Royals merchandise.[116] Kennedy was a recipient of the 2019 Bob Feller Act of Valor Award, presented to baseball players for their continued support of members of the United States military.[117]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Ian Kennedy Stats, Fantasy & News". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on July 30, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  2. ^ Kepner, Tyler (March 6, 2008). "Taking Control of His Future". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  3. ^ Sondheimer, Eric (April 2, 2002). "Two Ians Get the Job Done at La Quinta". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  4. ^ Bresnahan, Mike (March 3, 2003). "Two Ians Bring In the Crowds". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  5. ^ Sondheimer, Eric (June 8, 2003). "College Experience: Nearly Priceless". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  6. ^ "Baseball Announces 2004 Recruiting Class". USC Athletics. November 14, 2002. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  7. ^ Callis, Jim; Lingo, Will; Manuel, John, eds. (2007). Baseball America Prospect Handbook 2007. Durham, NC: Baseball America. p. 308. ISBN 978-1-932391-14-5. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  8. ^ "Ian Kennedy Earns Freshman All-America Honors". USC Athletics. June 25, 2004. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  9. ^ "Ian Kennedy Invited To 2005 USA Baseball National Team Trials". USC Athletics. May 23, 2005. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  10. ^ Stephens, Eric (January 28, 2005). "Trojans Are Prepared for a Return to Glory". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  11. ^ Moura, Pedro (May 24, 2011). "Where are they now: Ian Kennedy". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  12. ^ "Oregon State Advances To College World Series". USC Athletics. June 13, 2005. Archived from the original on February 26, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  13. ^ "Ian Kennedy Named Pac-10 Pitcher Of The Year". USC Athletics. May 31, 2005. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  14. ^ Harmonson, Todd (January 31, 2006). "USC back in the positive". The Orange County Register. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  15. ^ "USC's Kennedy flirts with no-hitter". The Orange County Register. February 18, 2006. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  16. ^ Kepner, Tyler (September 7, 2007). "Pitching Prospect Slipped Onto Yankees' Radar". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 17, 2018. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  17. ^ "Ian Kennedy Goes In First Round Of 2006 Major League Baseball Draft". USC Athletics. June 6, 2006. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  18. ^ "Kennedy Taken in First Round of Baseball Draft". USC News. University of Southern California. June 6, 2006. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  19. ^ Moura, Pedro (May 24, 2011). "Where are they now: Ian Kennedy". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  20. ^ a b Waggoner, Jim (August 12, 2015). "San Diego pitcher Ian Kennedy made pro debut in St. George". Staten Island Advance. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  21. ^ a b "Ian Kennedy Winter, Minor & Fall Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on November 9, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  22. ^ Czerwinski, Kevin T. (October 11, 2007). "Kennedy cruised through Minor Leagues". MiLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  23. ^ "Former Trojan Ian Kennedy Wins In Double A Debut". USC Athletics. June 6, 2007. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  24. ^ "Chamberlain and Kennedy join club". MiLB.com. Advanced Media Group. July 24, 2007. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  25. ^ Kepner, Tyler (August 30, 2007). "In Kennedy, Yankees See Familiar Approach". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  26. ^ Battista, Judy (September 2, 2007). "Kennedy's Debut a Success for Yankees". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  27. ^ Price, Ed (September 21, 2007). "Kennedy scratched from Saturday start". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  28. ^ "The future is now". Sports Illustrated. February 26, 2008. Archived from the original on January 28, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  29. ^ "Yankees Demote Pitcher Kennedy". The Mercury News. May 4, 2008. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  30. ^ Kepner, Tyler (August 9, 2008). "Kennedy Comes Back, but He's Not Improved". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  31. ^ Kepner, Tyler (March 7, 2010). "Ian Kennedy Looks Back". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  32. ^ "Kennedy to have surgery for aneurysm". ESPN.com. Associated Press. May 8, 2009. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  33. ^ Augustine, Bernie (September 2, 2009). "Ian Kennedy begins rehab from aneurysm surgery". Staten Island Advance. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  34. ^ Carig, Marc (September 20, 2009). "Ian Kennedy's long road back from aneurysm surgery leads to NY Yankees". The Star-Ledger. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  35. ^ "Yanks hold off Angels for rare series win in Anaheim". ESPN.com. Associated Press. September 23, 2009. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  36. ^ a b Lemire, Joe (March 16, 2012). "Kennedy toiled to reach the top – now the trick is staying there". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  37. ^ Kepner, Tyler (December 8, 2009). "Yankees Get Granderson in 3-Team Trade". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  38. ^ Kepner, Tyler (March 7, 2010). "Diamondbacks Count on Rotation Revamped in Trade". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  39. ^ "Ex-Yankee Ian Kennedy earns spot in Diamondbacks' rotation". The New York Post. March 28, 2010. Archived from the original on February 27, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  40. ^ Summers, Jeff (August 11, 2010). "Monitoring and Managing the Arizona Diamondbacks' Pitchers". Bleacher Report. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  41. ^ "LaRoche, Diamondbacks pound Cubs". Peoria Journal Star. April 29, 2010. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  42. ^ "Last-place Diamondbacks rough up Padres". ESPN.com. Associated Press. August 26, 2010. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  43. ^ a b c d e "Ian Kennedy Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on December 11, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  44. ^ "Ian Kennedy named Arizona's ace". ESPN.com. Associated Press. March 16, 2011. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  45. ^ "Wild pitch dooms Rockies in 11-inning loss vs. Diamondbacks". ESPN.com. Associated Press. April 1, 2011. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  46. ^ "Ian Kennedy silences Phillies with three-hit shutout". ESPN.com. Associated Press. April 25, 2011. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  47. ^ "Phillies ride John Mayberry Jr., David Herndon past Diamondbacks". ESPN.com. Associated Press. August 19, 2011. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  48. ^ "Kennedy wins 20th, Diamondbacks beat Pirates 1–0". The Deseret News. Associated Press. September 19, 2011. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  49. ^ "Kershaw wins 2011 NL Cy Young Award". The Orange County Register. November 17, 2011. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  50. ^ Bolch, Ben (September 30, 2011). "Diamondbacks' Ian Kennedy is ready, no doubt about it". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  51. ^ Knapel, Robert (November 15, 2011). "MLB Cy Young Award Winners 2011: AL and NL Results, Reaction and Analysis". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on July 23, 2019. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  52. ^ Baggarly, Andrew (September 23, 2011). "Arizona Diamondbacks beat San Francisco Giants to clinch National League West title". East Bay Times. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  53. ^ Botte, Peter (October 1, 2011). "Milwaukee Brewers too much for Ian Kennedy, Arizona Diamondbacks in 4–1 win to open NLDS". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  54. ^ Borzi, Pat (October 7, 2011). "Brewers Advance by Beating Diamondbacks in 10th Inning". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  55. ^ Pavlovic, Alex (April 6, 2012). "Tim Lincecum roughed up as San Francisco Giants lose opener to Arizona Diamondbacks". The Mercury News. Archived from the original on April 28, 2017. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  56. ^ Green, Adam (June 1, 2012). "D-Backs' Ian Kennedy hopes he's past early-season struggles". Arizona Sports 98.7 FM. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  57. ^ "Ian Kennedy strikes out 12 in Diamondbacks' rout of Rockies". ESPN.com. Associated Press. June 6, 2012. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  58. ^ "Kennedy has big hit, pitches D-backs to win". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Associated Press. July 23, 2012. Archived from the original on March 7, 2017. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  59. ^ Imber, Gil (September 27, 2012). "Why the Diamondbacks Should Sign Ian Kennedy to a Long-Term Deal". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on November 7, 2012. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  60. ^ "Ian Kennedy's strong outing helps Diamondbacks beat Cardinals". ESPN.com. Associated Press. April 2, 2013. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  61. ^ Witz, Billy (June 12, 2013). "Arizona Pitcher Criticized after Brawl". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 4, 2017. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  62. ^ Shaikin, Bill (June 14, 2013). "Ian Kennedy suspended 10 games for throwing at Dodgers' Zack Greinke". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 13, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  63. ^ "Ian Kennedy begins suspension". ESPN.com. Associated Press. June 17, 2013. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  64. ^ "Braves use 7-run 8th inning to knock off Diamondbacks". ESPN.com. Associated Press. June 29, 2013. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  65. ^ "Ian Kennedy traded to Padres". ESPN.com. Associated Press. July 31, 2013. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  66. ^ Center, Bill (July 31, 2013). "Padres add RHP Ian Kennedy to rotation". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  67. ^ Center, Bill (September 19, 2013). "Padres finishing strong against N.L.'s best". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  68. ^ Lin, Dennis (March 22, 2014). "Quick hits: Kennedy, Ross set". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  69. ^ Sanders, Jeff (May 9, 2014). "Offense can't finish what Kennedy starts". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  70. ^ Buchanan, Zach (August 24, 2014). "Ian Kennedy credits Padres coaches for his reversal". The Arizona Republic. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  71. ^ Sanders, Jeff (November 8, 2014). "Analysis: Kennedy's reestablished value". Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  72. ^ Lin, Dennis (September 27, 2014). "Kennedy beats Giants, reaches 200/200". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  73. ^ "Padres' Ian Kennedy exits home opener with hamstring injury". ESPN.com. April 9, 2015. Archived from the original on July 5, 2020. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  74. ^ "Gonzalez's 3-run homer leads Dodgers to 11–8 win over Padres". ESPN.com. Associated Press. April 26, 2015. Archived from the original on July 5, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  75. ^ Grathoff, Pete (January 16, 2016). "Nine things to know about pitcher Ian Kennedy". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on May 1, 2017. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  76. ^ a b Lin, Dennis (November 15, 2015). "Kennedy, Upton decline qualifying offers". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  77. ^ "Reports: Royals sign Ian Kennedy to five-year, $70 million deal". Sports Illustrated. January 16, 2016. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  78. ^ "Kennedy fitting in with World Series champion Royals". Daily Herald. Associated Press. February 20, 2016. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  79. ^ "Royals' Kennedy leaves early in loss to Rangers". The Topeka Capital-Journal. Associated Press. March 30, 2016. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  80. ^ "Kennedy impressive in Royals debut, beats Twins". Fulton Sun. April 9, 2016. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  81. ^ Scoby, Ashley (July 25, 2016). "Shaky start sinks KC". Salina Journal. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  82. ^ Flanagan, Jeffrey (August 15, 2016). "Kennedy amazed by string of strong outings". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  83. ^ Grathoff, Pete (November 17, 2016). "Royals' Ian Kennedy on watching playoffs on TV: 'It fuels that fire'". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on November 23, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  84. ^ "Danny Duffy to start Opening Day as Royals set rotation". ESPN.com. Associated Press. March 25, 2017. Archived from the original on May 21, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  85. ^ "Ian Kennedy put on DL by Royals with injured hamstring". The Topeka Capital-Journal. Associated Press. May 5, 2017. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  86. ^ "Twins power past Royals to salvage doubleheader split". ESPN.com. Associated Press. May 21, 2017. Archived from the original on September 4, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  87. ^ Flanagan, Jeffrey (November 28, 2017). "Kennedy: Injury 'took away my changeup' in '17". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on February 26, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  88. ^ Dodd, Rustin (November 6, 2017). "Ian Kennedy did not opt out. Can he be worth $49 million for the next three years?". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on June 19, 2018. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  89. ^ Newell, Jesse (April 24, 2018). "Ian Kennedy's career-long strikeout streak is snapped in Royals' 5–2 loss to Brewers". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on May 31, 2018. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  90. ^ "Royals starter Ian Kennedy to DL with oblique strain". ESPN.com. July 11, 2018. Archived from the original on June 29, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  91. ^ Denney, Jerrid (September 9, 2018). "Kennedy hot in return, but Royals fall to walk-off". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  92. ^ Worthy, Lynn (March 19, 2019). "Ian Kennedy ready for next part of his career as a relief pitcher as Royals make moves". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  93. ^ a b Worthy, Lynn (September 23, 2019). "How moving Ian Kennedy to closer turned into a big success for the Royals". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on October 13, 2020. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  94. ^ Worthy, Lynn (August 12, 2019). "Royals' Ian Kennedy joins a select group of pitchers in baseball history". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on November 21, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  95. ^ Worthy, Lynn (July 6, 2020). "Royals ready to get 'creative' with bullpen usage, and roles, during short MLB season". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on January 26, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  96. ^ "Cruz homers, Twins beat Royals 4–2 to open doubleheader". ESPN.com. Associated Press. August 15, 2020. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  97. ^ Flanagan, Jeffrey (August 31, 2020). "Royals place Kennedy (calf strain) on IL". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  98. ^ "Rangers will have veterans Ian Kennedy, Matt Bush in back end of bullpen". ESPN.com. Associated Press. March 28, 2021. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  99. ^ Landry, Kennedi (February 23, 2021). "Rangers sign RHP Kennedy to Minors deal". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on July 30, 2021. Retrieved July 30, 2021.
  100. ^ Landry, Kennedi (April 1, 2021). "Rangers finalize Opening Day roster". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on July 31, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  101. ^ Wilson, Jeff (May 7, 2021). "Texas Rangers gave Ian Kennedy a chance for a job. Now, he's the AL leader in saves". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Archived from the original on July 31, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  102. ^ Blum, Sam (June 9, 2021). "Rangers place closer Ian Kennedy on IL, recall RHP Spencer Patton for first MLB action in 5 years". The Dallas Morning News. Archived from the original on July 31, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  103. ^ Halicke, Chris (July 30, 2021). "Rangers Trade Gibson, Kennedy & Crouse To Phillies For Howard, Two Prospects". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on July 30, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  104. ^ Zolecki, Todd (July 30, 2021). "Phils trade for Gibson, Kennedy; Galvis back". MLB.com. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on July 31, 2021. Retrieved August 1, 2021.
  105. ^ Seidman, Corey (July 31, 2021). "A major, post-trade deadline shakeup in Phillies' starting rotation". NBC Sports Philadelphia. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 21, 2021.
  106. ^ "Ian Kennedy". Baseball Savant. Advanced Media Group. Archived from the original on July 7, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  107. ^ Crasnick, Jerry (August 18, 2011). "D-backs have a keeper in Ian Kennedy". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  108. ^ Perry, Dayn (February 27, 2015). "In honor of the late Leonard Nimoy, the 'Vulcan changeup'". CBS Sports. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  109. ^ Evans, Bill (July 30, 2021). "Phillies send Spencer Howard to Rangers for All-Star starter, closer at MLB trade deadline, reports say". NJ.com. Archived from the original on July 30, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  110. ^ Weaver, Levi (April 9, 2021). "Kyle Gibson's velocity, a look at Leody, and a worthwhile goal: It's a Weaver Wire". The Athletic. Archived from the original on July 31, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  111. ^ Judge, Lee (April 27, 2019). "Royals pitcher Ian Kennedy talks about the differences between starting and relieving". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on April 28, 2019. Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  112. ^ Epting, Chris (October 4, 2007). "In the Pipeline". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  113. ^ "Yanks rook, USC hoops player wed". Philadelphia Daily News. October 8, 2007. Archived from the original on August 3, 2021. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  114. ^ Wilhalme, Matt (August 1, 2015). "Ian Kennedy watches daughter's birth on FaceTime, then pitches in Padres' win". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 10, 2018. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  115. ^ Dodd, Rustin (September 23, 2017). "Royals' Ian Kennedy broke another streak this week. His wife gave birth to a son". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on October 13, 2017. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  116. ^ Grathoff, Pete (August 21, 2017). "Since joining Royals, Ian Kennedy has done something special for service members". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on June 19, 2018. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  117. ^ "Navy Baseball Takes Part in 2019 Bob Feller Act of Valor Award Ceremony". Naval Academy Athletics. November 15, 2019. Archived from the original on June 12, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.