Iris Rogers
Personal information
Country England
Bornfirst quarter 1930
Kensington

Iris Rogers (née Cooley), is a former English badminton player.

Badminton career

Born Iris L Cooley [1] she came to prominence in the early fifties when playing doubles. Partnering June Timperley née White the pair broke the stranglehold of the Danish pairs during the era of Danish domination by claiming three All England women's doubles titles. She also claimed an All England mixed doubles titles with John Best.[2]

Although mainly concentrating on doubles Rogers was also a very good singles player reaching the final of the All England in 1954 before losing out to Judy Devlin. Other successes included nine Irish open titles, nine Scottish open titles, three Dutch opens, one Swedish open and one Danish open title.

She represented England and won a silver medal in the women's doubles with Angela Bairstow, at the 1966 British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Kingston, Jamaica.[3][4][5][6]

Personal life

She married in William Rogers in 1956 and competed as Rogers and not Cooley afterwards.

Medal record at the All England Badminton Championships

[7]

Medal Year Event
Gold medal – first place 1953 Women's doubles
Gold medal – first place 1954 Mixed doubles
Silver medal – second place 1954 Women's singles
Silver medal – second place 1954 Women's doubles
Gold medal – first place 1955 Women's doubles
Silver medal – second place 1956 Women's doubles
Silver medal – second place 1957 Women's doubles
Silver medal – second place 1958 Women's doubles
Gold medal – first place 1959 Women's doubles

References

  1. ^ "Birth". Free BMD.
  2. ^ Davis, Pat (1983). Guinness Book of Badminton. Guinness Superlatives Ltd. ISBN 0-85112-271-X.
  3. ^ "1966 Athletes". Team England.
  4. ^ "Kingston, Jamaica, 1966 Team". Team England.
  5. ^ "Athletes and results". Commonwealth Games Federation.
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 23 January 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Times Archives". Oxfordshire Libraries.