Iron County
The Old Iron County Courthouse (now the Iron County Historical Museum) in Hurley, Wisconsin.
The Old Iron County Courthouse (now the Iron County Historical Museum) in Hurley, Wisconsin.
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Iron County
Location within the U.S. state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 46°20′N 90°16′W / 46.33°N 90.26°W / 46.33; -90.26
Country United States
State Wisconsin
Founded1893
Named forIron ore
SeatHurley
Largest cityHurley
Area
 • Total919 sq mi (2,380 km2)
 • Land758 sq mi (1,960 km2)
 • Water161 sq mi (420 km2)  18%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total6,137
 • Density6.7/sq mi (2.6/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district7th
Websitewww.co.iron.wi.gov

Iron County is a county located in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,916,[1] making it the third-least populous county in Wisconsin. Its county seat is Hurley.[2] It was named for the valuable iron ore found within its borders.[3][4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 919 square miles (2,380 km2), of which 758 square miles (1,960 km2) is land and 161 square miles (420 km2) (18%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

County Highways

Railroads

Buses

Airport

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19006,616
19108,30625.5%
192010,26123.5%
19309,933−3.2%
194010,0491.2%
19508,714−13.3%
19607,830−10.1%
19706,533−16.6%
19806,7303.0%
19906,153−8.6%
20006,86111.5%
20105,916−13.8%
20206,1373.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2020[1]
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Iron County.
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Iron County.

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,916 people living in the county. 97.9% were White, 0.6% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.1% Black or African American, 0.2% of some other race and 0.9% of two or more races. 0.6% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race). 22.9% were of German, 13.7% Italian, 12.6% Finnish, 8.2% Polish, 6.6% American and 5.4% Irish ancestry.[10]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 6,861 people, 3,083 households, and 1,960 families living in the county. The population density was 9 people per square mile (4/km2). There were 5,706 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.28% White, 0.09% Black or African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.06% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 0.66% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 20.9% were of German, 18.6% Italian, 15.2% Finnish, 9.3% Polish and 6.4% Irish ancestry. 97.1% spoke English as their first language.

There were 3,083 households, out of which 22.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.00% were married couples living together, 7.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.40% were non-families. 32.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.74.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 19.40% under the age of 18, 5.90% from 18 to 24, 24.70% from 25 to 44, 26.80% from 45 to 64, and 23.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 96.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.80 males.

In 2017, there were 34 births, giving a general fertility rate of 46.1 births per 1000 women aged 15–44, the 2nd lowest rate out of 72 Wisconsin counties. 13 of the births were to unmarried mothers, 21 were to married mothers.[12] Additionally, there were no reported induced abortions performed on women of Iron County residence in 2017.[13]

Communities

Entrance sign on US 51
Entrance sign on US 51

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Historical sites

The National Register of Historic Places lists the following historic sites in Iron County:[14][15][16][17][18]

Site Area of significance Year added
Annala Round Barn Architecture, agriculture 1979
Montreal Company Location Historic District Landscape architecture, community planning and development, industry 1980
Old Iron County Courthouse Politics/government, architecture 1977
Plummer Mine Headframe Engineering, industry 1997
Springstead Architecture, exploration/settlement 1997

Politics

From 1928 to 1996, Iron County voted Democratic in presidential elections, the only exception being Richard Nixon's landslide in 1972. In 2000, George W. Bush became only the second Republican since 1920 to carry Iron County despite narrowly losing the national popular vote, and the county remained a competitive county for the next three elections, narrowly voting for Kerry in 2004 and for Romney in 2012. Recent elections have seen the county trend solidly Republican however; in 2016, Trump won the county with 59.2% (the first time a Republican had won an outright majority in the county since 1920), and in 2020, he increased his vote share to 60.8%.

United States presidential election results for Iron County, Wisconsin[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 2,438 60.80% 1,533 38.23% 39 0.97%
2016 2,081 59.24% 1,275 36.29% 157 4.47%
2012 1,790 49.28% 1,784 49.12% 58 1.60%
2008 1,464 42.66% 1,914 55.77% 54 1.57%
2004 1,884 48.57% 1,956 50.43% 39 1.01%
2000 1,734 49.44% 1,620 46.19% 153 4.36%
1996 1,260 35.68% 1,725 48.85% 546 15.46%
1992 1,273 32.72% 1,762 45.28% 856 22.00%
1988 1,599 43.04% 2,090 56.26% 26 0.70%
1984 1,667 45.63% 1,967 53.85% 19 0.52%
1980 1,811 45.04% 1,941 48.27% 269 6.69%
1976 1,340 35.26% 2,399 63.13% 61 1.61%
1972 1,723 49.93% 1,648 47.75% 80 2.32%
1968 1,137 34.30% 1,913 57.71% 265 7.99%
1964 963 27.67% 2,514 72.24% 3 0.09%
1960 1,290 30.94% 2,873 68.90% 7 0.17%
1956 1,930 46.22% 2,226 53.30% 20 0.48%
1952 1,733 39.24% 2,662 60.28% 21 0.48%
1948 1,281 30.43% 2,665 63.32% 263 6.25%
1944 1,345 31.51% 2,894 67.81% 29 0.68%
1940 1,672 31.73% 3,525 66.90% 72 1.37%
1936 902 20.78% 3,319 76.46% 120 2.76%
1932 891 25.29% 2,338 66.36% 294 8.35%
1928 1,274 40.68% 1,724 55.04% 134 4.28%
1924 1,058 40.17% 84 3.19% 1,492 56.64%
1920 1,714 77.70% 268 12.15% 224 10.15%
1916 672 54.63% 475 38.62% 83 6.75%
1912 473 39.98% 347 29.33% 363 30.68%
1908 1,134 73.92% 314 20.47% 86 5.61%
1904 1,250 81.12% 246 15.96% 45 2.92%
1900 1,318 76.81% 356 20.75% 42 2.45%
1896 1,288 72.04% 472 26.40% 28 1.57%


See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 166.
  4. ^ "Here's How Iron Got Its Name". The Rhinelander Daily News. June 16, 1932. p. 2. Retrieved August 24, 2014 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 5, 2015.
  10. ^ ""American FactFinder"". Archived from the original on January 8, 2015. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ "Annual Wisconsin Birth and Infant Mortality Report, 2017 P-01161-19 (June 2019): Detailed Tables". Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  13. ^ Reported Induced Abortions in Wisconsin, Office of Health Informatics, Division of Public Health, Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Section: Trend Information, 2013-2017, Table 18, pages 17-18
  14. ^ "STH 77 | National or State Registers Record". Wisconsin Historical Society. January 1, 2012. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  15. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Continuation Sheet". NPGallery. April 17, 1997. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  16. ^ "S of Hurley | National or State Registers Record". Wisconsin Historical Society. January 1, 2012. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  17. ^ American Association for State and Local History. United States. National Park Service, issuing body. National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers. National Register of Historic Places, 1966-1994 : cumulative list through January 1, 1994. ISBN 0-89133-254-5. OCLC 40135121.
  18. ^ "0.25 mi. W of jct. of Plummer Mine Rd. and STH 77 | National or State Registers Record". Wisconsin Historical Society. January 1, 2012. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 9, 2020.

Further reading

Coordinates: 46°20′N 90°16′W / 46.33°N 90.26°W / 46.33; -90.26