Isaac Milliken
Isaac-milliken.jpg
16th Mayor of Chicago
In office
March 15, 1854[1] – March 13, 1855[2]
Preceded byCharles Gray
Succeeded byLevi Boone
Chicago Alderman from the 2nd Ward[3]
In office
1850–1854
Serving with Alexander Loyd (1850–1851)
Hugh Maher (1851–1853)
John Evans (1853–1854)
Preceded byGeorge W. Snow/ Henry L. Rucker
Succeeded byLevi Boone
Personal details
Born(1813-08-29)August 29, 1813
Saco, Maine
DiedDecember 2, 1889(1889-12-02) (aged 74)
Chicago, Illinois, United States
Resting placeRosehill Cemetery
Political partyDemocratic
Residence(s)Chicago, Illinois
Signature

Isaac Lawrence Milliken (August 29, 1813 – December 2, 1889) served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois from 1854 to 1855. He was a member of the Democratic Party.

Born in Saco, Maine, Milliken moved to Chicago in 1837 and set up a blacksmith shop on Randolph Street.[4][5] Here, Milliken taught himself law and was twice elected alderman and appointed an assistant county judge.[5]

In the election of 1854, Milliken defeated Amos Gaylord Throop, who ran on the Temperance Party ticket, with nearly 60% of the vote.[6][7] Although Throop was the temperance candidate, after winning the election, Milliken declared himself in favor of temperance as well.[8] He ran for re-election the following year against Levi Boone, of the American Party and lost with 47% of the vote.[9]

Following his term as mayor, Milliken stayed in public service, becoming a police magistrate.[10]

He died at his home in Chicago on December 2, 1889, and was buried at Rosehill Cemetery.[11]

References

  1. ^ "Mayor Isaac Lawrence Milliken Inaugural Address, 1854". www.chipublib.org. Chicago Public Library. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  2. ^ "Mayor Levi Day Boone Inaugural Address, 1855". www.chipublib.org. Chicago Public Library. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  3. ^ "Centennial List of Mayors, City Clerks, City Attorneys, City Treasurers, and Aldermen, elected by the people of the city of Chicago, from the incorporation of the city on March 4, 1837 to March 4, 1937, arranged in alphabetical order, showing the years during which each official held office". Archived from the original on September 4, 2018. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  4. ^ Pierce, Bessie Louise (1940). A History of Chicago, Vol. II: From Town to City 1848-1871. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 305.
  5. ^ a b The Chicago City Manual. Chicago: Bureau of Statistics and Municipal library. 1911. pp. 35.
  6. ^ Walker, Thomas (November 4, 2008). "Chicago Mayor 1854". Our Campaigns. Retrieved June 6, 2012.
  7. ^ Pierce, Bessie Louise (1940). A History of Chicago, Vol. II: From Town to City 1848-1871. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 202.
  8. ^ Miller, Richard Lawrence (2012). Lincoln and His World: The Path to the Presidency, 1854-1860. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press. p. 64. ISBN 978-0786459292.
  9. ^ Walker, Thomas (November 4, 2008). "Chicago Mayor 1855". Our Campaigns. Retrieved June 6, 2012.
  10. ^ Gale, Edwin O. (1902). Reminiscences of Early Chicago and Vicinity. Chicago: Revell. pp. 386.
  11. ^ "An Old Settler Gone". Chicago Tribune. December 3, 1889. p. 6. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.