Jack Wiggins Jr.
Born (1926-01-01) January 1, 1926 (age 95)
EducationUniversity of Oklahoma
Southern Methodist University
Purdue University
Known forPast president, American Psychological Association
Scientific career
FieldsPsychology

Jack Gillmore Wiggins Jr. (born January 1, 1926) is an American psychologist and a past president of the American Psychological Association (APA).

Biography

Wiggins earned an undergraduate psychology degree from the University of Oklahoma in 1948. He completed a master's degree from Southern Methodist University and a Ph.D. from Purdue University.[1]

Serving as the 1992 APA president,[2] Wiggins was the second of five APA presidents elected between 1990 and 2000 who publicly advocated for prescriptive privileges for psychologists.[3]

Wiggins is a board member emeritus of the Academy of Medical Psychology. He was editor of the Archives of Medical Psychology.[4] In 2005, Wiggins was recognized by APA president Ronald F. Levant for his efforts in advocating for prescriptive privileges for psychologists.[5] The next year, he was honored with a lifetime achievement award from the American Psychological Foundation.[6]

References

  1. ^ "Past Distinguished Alumni Recipients". Purdue University. Archived from the original on November 28, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  2. ^ "Former APA presidents". American Psychological Association. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  3. ^ McGrath, Robert E. (2010). "Prescriptive authority for psychologists" (PDF). Annual Review of Clinical Psychology. 6: 21–47. doi:10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-090209-151448. PMID 20192790. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  4. ^ "Board of Directors". Academy of Medical Psychology. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  5. ^ "Recognizing outstanding achievements". Monitor on Psychology. 36 (10): 12. November 2005. Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  6. ^ "Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Jack G. Wiggins Jr". American Psychologist. 61 (5): 399–401. 2006. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.61.5.399. PMID 16846303.