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Jainendra Kumar
JainendraKumarImage.jpg
Born(1905-01-02)2 January 1905
Kodiyaganj, United Provinces of Agra and Oudh, British India
Died24 December 1988(1988-12-24) (aged 83)
LanguageHindi
NationalityIndian
Notable works
  • Parakh
  • Paap Aur Prakash
  • Muktibodh
Notable awardsPadma Bhushan
1971
Sahitya Akademi Fellowship
1979
Sahitya Akademi Award
1966

Jainendra Kumar (2 January 1905 – 24 December 1988) was a 20th century Indian writer who wrote in Hindi. He wrote novels include Sunita and Tyagapatra. He was awarded one of India's highest civilian honours, the Padma Bhushan in 1971.[1] He was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award by the Sahitya Akademi in 1966, for his work Muktibodh (novelette), and its highest award, the Sahitya Akademi Fellowship in 1979.[2]

1965 photo-print of an informal gathering of poets/writers at the residence of Zia Fatehabadi. Seen left to right: Naresh Kumar Shad, Kailash Chander Naaz, Talib Dehalvi, Khushtar Girami, Balraj Hairat, Saghar Nizami, Talib Chakwali, Munavvar Lakhnavi, Malik Ram, Jainendra Kumar, Zia Fatehabadi, Rishi Patialvi, Bahar Burney, Joginder Pal, Unwan Chishti and Krishan Mohan.
1965 photo-print of an informal gathering of poets/writers at the residence of Zia Fatehabadi. Seen left to right: Naresh Kumar Shad, Kailash Chander Naaz, Talib Dehalvi, Khushtar Girami, Balraj Hairat, Saghar Nizami, Talib Chakwali, Munavvar Lakhnavi, Malik Ram, Jainendra Kumar, Zia Fatehabadi, Rishi Patialvi, Bahar Burney, Joginder Pal, Unwan Chishti and Krishan Mohan.

Literary works

Translations

Awards and honors

References

  1. ^ "Padma Bhushan". Archived from the original on 7 October 2008. Retrieved 8 May 2008.
  2. ^ Official site for Sahitya Akademi Awards Archived 13 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine