James Ogilvie
Biographical details
Bornc. 1866
England
DiedJuly 12, 1950
Amesbury, Massachusetts
Playing career
1891–1894Williams
Position(s)Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1899NYU
Head coaching record
Overall2–6

James Ogilvie (c. 1866 – July 12, 1950) was a physician and surgeon as well as an American football player and coach.[1] He served the third head football coach at New York University (NYU). He held that position for the 1899 season, leading the NYU Violets to a record of 2–6.[2] One of the two wins for his team was a 6–5 victory over Rutgers[3] In at least two other games, against Hamilton and Columbia, the team produced what were considered to be poor performances.[4][5] Ogilvie was referred to at least one time as "Dr. Ogilvie"[6] and had previously played as a guard at Williams College from 1891 to 1894,[7][8][9] a member of the class of 1895.[10][11] He also attended Columbia University, where he received his M. D.[12]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
NYU Violets (Independent) (1899)
1899 NYU 2–6
NYU: 2–6
Total: 2–6

References

  1. ^ "Dr. James Ogilvie". The North Adams Transcript. July 14, 1950. p. 3. Retrieved January 4, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ "New York Coaching Records". Archived from the original on 2010-12-13.
  3. ^ New York Times "New York University Wins" November 12, 1899
  4. ^ New York Times "Hamilton College Beats New York University" November 26, 1899
  5. ^ New York Times "Football at Columbia" October 26, 1899
  6. ^ New York Times "Football at New York University" September 26, 1899
  7. ^ "Officers and Graduates of Columbia University, Originally the College of the ..." 1916.
  8. ^ New York Times "FIGHTING FOOTBALL PLAYERS.; THE WILLIAMS ELEVEN ACT BADLY IN THE GAME WITH HARVARD." October 18, 1891
  9. ^ New York Times "A Ray of Hope for Yale" October 13, 1892
  10. ^ "Williams College Bulletin". 1915.
  11. ^ "Williamstown". The North Adams Transcript. September 17, 1895. p. 3. Retrieved January 4, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  12. ^ "Williams College Catalogue, 1905". Mocavo.