Jim Boeheim
Boeheim in 2014
Biographical details
Born (1944-11-17) November 17, 1944 (age 79)
Lyons, New York, U.S.
Playing career
1963–1966Syracuse
Position(s)Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969–1976Syracuse (assistant)
1976–2023Syracuse
Head coaching record
Overall1,015–441 (.697)[a]
Tournaments48*–28 (NCAA Division I)
13–8 (NIT)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Awards
Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2005 (profile)
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006
Medal record
Assistant coach for  United States
men's national basketball team
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2008 Beijing Team
Gold medal – first place 2012 London Team
Gold medal – first place 2016 Rio de Janeiro Team
FIBA World Championship
Gold medal – first place 2010 Turkey Team
Gold medal – first place 2014 Spain Team
Bronze medal – third place 1990 Argentina Team
Bronze medal – third place 2006 Japan Team
FIBA Americas Championship
Gold medal – first place 2007 Las Vegas Men's basketball

James Arthur Boeheim Jr. (/ˈbhm/ BAY-hyme; born November 17, 1944) is an American former college basketball coach and current Special Assistant to the Athletic Director at Syracuse University. From 1976 until 2023, he was the head coach of the Syracuse Orange men's team of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Boeheim guided the Orange to ten Big East Conference regular season championships, five Big East tournament championships, and 34 NCAA tournament appearances, including five Final Four appearances and three appearances in the national title game. In those games, the Orangemen lost to Indiana in 1987, and to Kentucky in 1996, before defeating Kansas in 2003 with All-American Carmelo Anthony.[1][2]

Boeheim has served as the President of the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), chairman of the USA Basketball committees, and on various board of directors. He served as an assistant coach for the United States men's national basketball team at the Summer Olympics (2008, 2012, 2016) and the FIBA World Championships (1990, 2006, 2010).[3] Boeheim was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in September 2005.[4]

Boeheim intended to retire in 2018 but departure of expected successor Mike Hopkins for the head coaching position at Washington would keep him at Syracuse until his eventual retirement in 2023. During the 2021–22 season Boeheim coached both of his sons, Jimmy and Buddy Boeheim. Boeheim would become the winningest active coach in Division I basketball on April 2, 2022, after the retirement of Mike Krzyzewski. As a result of the Syracuse athletics scandal in 2015, the NCAA vacated 101 of his wins.

After suffering from cancer in 2001, Boeheim founded with his wife the Jim and Juli Boeheim Foundation, which is devoted to child welfare, cancer treatment, and prevention.[5]

Early life

Boeheim was born in 1944 in a German-American family to parents Janet and James Boeheim Sr. in Lyons, New York, a small town about 57 miles west of Syracuse.[6] His family owned a funeral home, started by his great-grandfather in the mid-1800s.[7][8][9] He graduated from Lyons Central High School, where he starred for coach Dick Blackwell's team.[10][11][12]

Career

Playing

Boeheim enrolled in Syracuse University as a student in 1962, and graduated with a bachelor's degree in social science.[1] During his freshman year, Boeheim was a walk-on with the freshman basketball team. By his senior year, he was the varsity team captain and a teammate of All-American Dave Bing, his freshman roommate.[13] The pair led coach Fred Lewis's Orangemen[b] to a 22–6 overall win–loss record that earned the team's second-ever NCAA tournament berth. While at Syracuse, he joined the Delta Upsilon fraternity. He played as a student at SU for two seasons and in 1970s served as the university’s last golf coach.[14][15]

After graduating from Syracuse, Boeheim played professionally with the Scranton Miners of the Eastern Professional Basketball League, during which he won two championships and was a second-team all-star.[2] While working as a graduate assistant, he earned a graduate degree from Syracuse in 1973.

Coaching

In 1969, Boeheim decided to coach basketball and was hired as a graduate assistant at Syracuse under Roy Danforth. Soon thereafter he was promoted to a full-time assistant coach and was a member of the coaching staff that helped guide the Orangemen to the 1975 NCAA tournament, where Syracuse University made its first Final Four appearance.

In 1976, Danforth left to become the head basketball coach and athletic director at Tulane University. A coaching search then led to naught, and Boeheim was promoted by athletic director Les Dye in a 3–2 split hiring decision to become Syracuse's seventh head coach.[16][17][18] He won the first game against Harvard by 20 points,[19] and finished the season with a 26–4 record and a Sweet 16 appearance.[20]

Apart from his brief stint in the pros, Boeheim has spent his entire adult life at Syracuse, as either a student-athlete (1962-1966), assistant coach (1969-1976) or head coach (1976-2023), a rarity in modern-day major collegiate athletics. In 2018, CBSSports.com writer Matt Norlander emphasized this in a piece where he speculated on potential successors for Boeheim, stating:

Boeheim does not have a parallel in major college athletics. There has never been a Division I coach in men's basketball, women's basketball or football who has spent more than 40 years at their alma mater and never coached anywhere else. Boeheim's the only one. There is no coaching figure more synonymous and literally affiliated with only one school.[21]

Norlander also noted that Boeheim entered the 2018–19 season with nearly as many wins on his official coaching record, and more when counting wins vacated by the NCAA, than all of his predecessors combined, and in his various roles at Syracuse had been involved in over half of all games in Syracuse's 114-year basketball history.[21]

In 1986, Boeheim was offered the head coaching job at Ohio State but turned it down to stay at Syracuse.[22][23]

During a Syracuse–Georgetown game in the early 1980s, Hoyas star Patrick Ewing was nearly struck by an orange, and at times had endured racial taunts from the SU student section. Boeheim borrowed a microphone and threatened to forfeit the game if fans continued to throw objects at Ewing.[24]

In his first 41 years as head coach at Syracuse, Boeheim guided the Orange to postseason berths, either in the NCAA or NIT tournaments, in every year in which the Orange have been eligible. The only times Syracuse missed the postseason were in 1993 when NCAA sanctions barred them from postseason play despite a 20–9 record[25][26] and in 2015 when Syracuse University self-imposed a one-year postseason ban related to the 2015 NCAA sanctions against the university's sports programs.[27][28] In 2022, he had his first losing season, and missed the postseason.[29][30] During his tenure, the Orange have appeared in three NCAA national championship games (1987, 1996, and 2003) and won the national title in 2003.

Boeheim has been named Big East coach of the year four times, and has been named as District II Coach of the Year by the National Association of Basketball Coaches ten times. In 2004, Boeheim received two additional awards. The first was during the spring when he was awarded the Clair Bee Award in recognition of his contributions to the sport of basketball. During the fall of the same year Boeheim was presented with Syracuse University's Arents Award, the university's highest alumni honor.

Boeheim's coaching style at Syracuse is unusual in that, whereas many highly successful coaches prefer the man-to-man defense, he demonstrates a preference for the match-up 2–3 zone.[31][32] Having been fond of the zone, he implemented the defensive style early on among other, but went almost exclusively to the zone only around 1996.[31][33][34]

Boeheim, Monty Williams, and Tom Thibodeau served as assistant coaches for the 2014 United States FIBA World Cup team.

In an exhibition game on November 7, 2005, against Division II school Saint Rose from Albany, New York, Boeheim was ejected for the first time in his career after arguing a call late in the first half in the Orange's 86–73 victory. He was also ejected from Cameron Indoor Stadium on February 22, 2014, against Duke after arguing a player control foul call.[35][36]

Boeheim has also been a coach for USA national teams. In 2001, during his seventh year as a USA basketball coach, Boeheim helped lead the Young Men's Team to a gold medal at the World Championship in Japan. During the fall of that year, he was named USA Basketball 2001 National Coach of the Year. He was an assistant coach under Mike Krzyzewski for the US national team in the 1990 FIBA World Championship and 2006 FIBA World Championship, winning the bronze medal both times.[37][38] He returned as an assistant coach under Mike Krzyzewski for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China, and again at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England, where the United States won the gold medal both times.[39][40][41]

Boeheim has served as the chairman of the USA Basketball 2009–12 Men's Junior National Committee, as well as the 2007–08 President of the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), where he also served on the board of directors.[42][43][44]

In the 2012–13 season, Boeheim led Syracuse to its first Final Four appearance since its 2003 NCAA National Championship. The Orange lost 61–56 to Michigan. In the 2013–14 season, he led the Orange to the NCAA Tournament and lost in the third-round game to the Dayton Flyers.

After Syracuse sat out the 2015 tournament via a self-imposed postseason ban, Boeheim again led Syracuse to a surprise Final Four berth in the 2015–16 season.[45] This included a 15-point comeback versus the No. 1 seeded Virginia Cavaliers.[46] The team lost to North Carolina 83–66.

The following season Syracuse started ranked 19th in the AP Poll, but failed to make the NCAA tournament.[47] In the 2017–18 season Syracuse would return to the NCAA tournament despite going 8–10 in conference play. In the tournament Syracuse upset 4-seeded Michigan State before losing to Duke in the Sweet 16.[48] The next year saw the Orange make back-to-back NCAA tournament appearances for the first time since the 2013–14 season. On January 14, 2019, Syracuse upset Duke in Cameron Indoor Stadium, marking the first time that the Blue Devils had lost to an unranked team at home. They would lose to Baylor in the opening round of the NCAA tournament. Syracuse started the 2019–20 season slow, losing 48–34 to Virginia, the lowest amount ever scored by a team in Boeheim's career.[49] SU would win its final game of the season in the ACC tournament beating North Carolina 81–53 and defeating the Tar Heels for the first time since 2014. This would be the last game played due to COVID-19/[50] In the 2020–21 season SU would once again upset its way to the Sweet 16 beating 3-seeded West Virginia before losing to eventual Final Four participant Houston.

The Syracuse basketball program has been investigated for major NCAA violations on two occasions during Boeheim's tenure.[51][52]

NCAA violations and punishment

Main article: Syracuse University athletics scandal

Boeheim seeks an explanation from a referee at Cassell Coliseum in 2020.

On March 6, 2015, the NCAA suspended Boeheim for the first nine games of 2015–16 ACC conference play and took away 12 scholarships over a four-year period, as a result of a multi-year investigation into the university's athletic programs.[53] The program was forced to vacate a total of 101 wins from the 2004–2005, 2005–2006, 2006–2007, 2010–2011, and 2011–2012 seasons, which included any game during those years where one or more players deemed to have been ineligible played.[54] This constitutes the third-most wins ever permanently vacated by one program, behind the 113 wins vacated by Michigan and 123 wins by Louisville.[55] Ten of the vacated wins were NCAA Tournament games.[56] However, the NCAA confirmed that sanctions did not include the removal of any trophies or banners. Therefore, Syracuse displays banners for all of its NCAA appearances and conference titles from those years.[57]

After two appeals, Boeheim's nine-game suspension was upheld, though he was permitted to begin the suspension prior to ACC conference play as dictated in the original penalty. Additionally, the permanent vacation and erasure of 101 wins was upheld.[58][59] However, the number of scholarships lost by Syracuse was reduced to 8 over a four-year period, down from 12 over the same period.[58]

Planned departure, reversal, and eventual retirement

Boeheim announced in 2015 that he would retire in March 2018.[60][61] However, following the departure of his long-time assistant coach and expected successor Mike Hopkins in 2017, Boeheim's contract was extended by Syracuse beyond 2017 for an unknown period.[62] In 2017, when his son Buddy committed to play at Syracuse starting in 2018, he extended his contract to beyond the 2017–18 season.[63]

Boeheim was replaced following the 2022–23 season by former Syracuse point guard and assistant coach Adrian Autry.[64][65] The New York Times reported that whether Boeheim had retired or been ousted was not immediately clear,[66] but in a press conference a day later, Boeheim announced that he was thrilled to be retired.[67]

Boeheim stayed at Syracuse, with a new job title of Special assistant to the athletic director.[16][68][69] Boeheim's legacy was noted by sports media;[70][71] Pete Thamel noted that Boeheim left a complicated legacy and his exit was far more fitting,[72] Pat Forde called him an ultimate loyalist,[73] ESPN's McMenamin said his exit was an "end of a coaching generation",[74] while Syracuse Post-Standard's editorial board opined that "Boeheim put Syracuse on the map".[75] In November of 2023 it was announced he would join the ACC Network's studio show Nothing But Net as analyst along with working with Wes Durham as analyst for games.

Awards and honors

Boeheim with his team at the 2013 NCAA tournament

NCAA

Boeheim's notable accomplishments during his career include:

Halls of Fame

Win milestones

Other

Coaching tree

Boeheim with guard Scoop Jardine, and assistant coaches Adrian Autry and Mike Hopkins.

These former assistant coaches or players of Boeheim later became head coaches at the collegiate level or higher.

Additionally, all three assistants on Boeheim's 2022–23 coaching staff played at Syracuse under Boeheim: Adrian Autry, Gerry McNamara, and Allen Griffin.[94]

Personal life and charity

Boeheim appeared in the movie Blue Chips, with Nick Nolte and Shaquille O'Neal, playing himself. Boeheim also appeared in the Spike Lee movie He Got Game, again playing himself. Boeheim has appeared in numerous commercials throughout Central New York and also had a spot in a nationwide Nike Jordan ad featuring former Syracuse great Carmelo Anthony.

Boeheim had prostate cancer in 2001 and subsequently became a major fundraiser for Coaches vs. Cancer, a non-profit collaboration between the NABC and the American Cancer Society, through which he has helped raise more than US$4.5 million for ACS's Central New York chapter since 2000.[95][96][97] In 2009, Boeheim and his wife, Juli, founded the Jim and Juli Boeheim Foundation to expand their charitable mission to organizations around Central New York concerned with child welfare, as well as cancer treatment and prevention.[98][99]

Boeheim married his wife Juli in 1997,[1][18][100] and they have three children together: Jimmy and a set of twins, son Buddy and daughter Jamie.[101] Boeheim also has a daughter with former wife Elaine.[1] His son Jimmy played forward for Cornell from 2017 to 2020, but did not get to play what would have been his senior season at Cornell because the Ivy League canceled its 2020–21 season due to COVID-19. He entered the NCAA transfer portal in the fall of 2020,[102] transferred to Syracuse, and played the 2021-22 season for Syracuse.[103][104] Jamie played forward for the University of Rochester. Buddy played guard for his father at Syracuse and signed a two-way contract with the Detroit Pistons after going undrafted in the 2022 NBA draft.[100][105][106]

Around 11:22 p.m. on February 20, 2019, Boeheim was driving his car on Interstate 690 in Syracuse when he struck and killed a 51-year-old man who was standing near the side of the road.[107] The accident was reportedly a result of a disabled car being in the middle of the road in bad weather. When Boeheim maneuvered around the other car, he struck the man, who had been a passenger in the disabled car. Field, speed, and sobriety tests were administered by police. Boeheim was speeding, but Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick determined the collision would have been fatal even if Boeheim was going the speed limit at the time.[108] It was additionally found that the disabled vehicle did not have lights on and had non-operational rear marker lights, and that the passengers of the disabled car, including the man who was struck and killed, were wearing dark clothing. Boeheim was not charged relating to the incident.[109][110][111] In April 2023, lawyers for Boeheim agreed to settle a lawsuit filed by the family of a man killed in the crash.[112]

Boeheim has received criticism for his aggressive nature toward the press and often got into spats with beat writers.[113][114][18] In March 2021, he was criticised for mocking a reporter's height during a postgame press conference following a win against Clemson.[115][116]

Head coaching record

Statistics overview
Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Syracuse Orangemen (NCAA Division I independent) (1976–1979)
1976–77 † Syracuse 26–4 NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1977–78 Syracuse 22–6 NCAA Division I Round of 32
1978–79 Syracuse 26–4 NCAA Division I Sweet 16


Syracuse Orangemen/Orange (Big East Conference) (1979–2013)
1979–80 Syracuse 26–4 5–1 T–1st NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1980–81 Syracuse 22–12 6–8 6th NIT Runner-up
1981–82 Syracuse 16–13 7–7 T–5th NIT Round of 32
1982–83 Syracuse 21–10 9–7 5th NCAA Division I Round of 32
1983–84 Syracuse 23–9 12–4 T–2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1984–85 Syracuse 22–9 9–7 T–3rd NCAA Division I Round of 32
1985–86 Syracuse 26–6 14–2 T–1st NCAA Division I Round of 32
1986–87 Syracuse 31–7 12–4 T–1st NCAA Division I Runner-up
1987–88 Syracuse 26–9 11–5 2nd NCAA Division I Round of 32
1988–89 Syracuse 30–8 10–6 3rd NCAA Division I Elite Eight
1989–90 Syracuse 26–7 12–4 T–1st NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1990–91 Syracuse 26–6 12–4 1st NCAA Division I Round of 64
1991–92 Syracuse 22–10 10–8 T–5th NCAA Division I Round of 32
1992–93 Syracuse 20–9 10–8 3rd Ineligible
1993–94 Syracuse 23–7 13–5 2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1994–95 Syracuse 20–10 12–6 3rd NCAA Division I Round of 32
1995–96 Syracuse 29–9 12–6 2nd (BE 7) NCAA Division I Runner-up
1996–97 Syracuse 19–13 9–9 T–4th (BE 7) NIT Round of 64
1997–98 Syracuse 26–9 12–6 1st (BE 7) NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1998–99 Syracuse 21–12 10–8 T–4th NCAA Division I Round of 64
1999–00 Syracuse 26–6 13–3 T–1st NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2000–01 Syracuse 25–9 10–6 T–2nd (West) NCAA Division I Round of 32
2001–02 Syracuse 23–13 9–7 T–3rd (West) NIT Fourth Place
2002–03 Syracuse 30–5 13–3 T–1st (West) NCAA Division I champion
2003–04 Syracuse 23–8 11–5 T–3rd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2004–05 Syracuse 12–7* 11–5* * NCAA Division I Round of 64*
2005–06 Syracuse 0–12* 0–9* * NCAA Division I Round of 64*
2006–07 Syracuse 2–11* 2–6* * NIT Quarterfinal*
2007–08 Syracuse 21–14 9–9 T–8th NIT Quarterfinal
2008–09 Syracuse 28–10 11–7 6th NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2009–10 Syracuse 30–5 15–3 1st NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2010–11 Syracuse 20–8* 12–6* * NCAA Division I Round of 32*
2011–12 Syracuse 0–3* 0–1* * NCAA Division I Elite Eight*
2012–13 Syracuse 30–10 11–7 5th NCAA Division I Final Four


Syracuse Orange (Atlantic Coast Conference) (2013–2023)
2013–14 Syracuse 28–6 14–4 2nd NCAA Division I Round of 32
2014–15 Syracuse 18–13 9–9 8th Ineligible
2015–16 Syracuse 19–9** 9–6** T–9th NCAA Division I Final Four
2016–17 Syracuse 19–15 10–8 T–7th NIT Second Round
2017–18 Syracuse 23–14 8–10 T–10th NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2018–19 Syracuse 20–14 10–8 T-7th NCAA Division I Round of 64
2019–20 Syracuse 18–14 10–10 T-6th Postseason not held
2020–21 Syracuse 18–10 9–7 8th NCAA Division I Sweet 16
2021–22 Syracuse 16–17 9–11 9th
2022–23 Syracuse 17–15 10–10 T–8th
Syracuse: 1,015*–441 (.697)*** 432–275 (.611)
Total: 1,015*–441 (.697)***[a]

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

- From 1975 to 1982, the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) organized annual regional end-of-season men's basketball tournaments for independent Division I ECAC member colleges and universities in the Northeastern United States. The winner of each regional tournament was declared the ECAC regional champion for the season and received an automatic bid in the NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament.

* The NCAA vacated 15 wins from the 2004–05 season, 23 wins from the 2005–06 season, 22 wins from the 2006–07 season, 7 wins from the 2010–11 season, and 34 wins from the 2011–12 season as a result of the Syracuse athletics scandal.[117]

** Boeheim was suspended for nine games during the 2015–16 season, during which Syracuse went 4–5 overall, and 0–3 in conference. So while the team's record was 23–14 overall, 9–9 in conference, Boeheim is credited with 19–9 overall, 9–6 in conference.

*** Boeheim's official NCAA record excludes the aforementioned 101 vacated wins as well as the games during his nine-game suspension in 2015–2016, however Syracuse claims all of its NCAA appearances and conference titles from those years.[57]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Some websites list Boeheim's record at 1,116–441 (.717), which include the 101 wins later vacated by NCAA.
  2. ^ Syracuse did not change its nickname to "Orange" until the 2004–05 school year.
  3. ^ Boeheim had already achieved the mark in terms of actual games on February 4, 2017 against #9 Virginia,[83][84] but Syracuse and Boeheim under NCAA sanctions in 2015 were permanently vacated 101 wins, resulting in Mike Krzyzewski statistically becoming the first ever.[85]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "SU Athletics Profile". suathletics.com. Archived from the original on May 14, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Orange Hoops Profile". orangehoops.org. Archived from the original on November 13, 2007. Retrieved November 19, 2007.
  3. ^ "USA Basketball Profile". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on October 29, 2007. Retrieved November 19, 2007.
  4. ^ "Basketball Hall of Fame Profile". hoophall.com. Archived from the original on February 12, 2008. Retrieved December 31, 2008.
  5. ^ Waters, Mike (May 20, 2012). "Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim keeps working for cancer breakthrough". syracuse.com. Archived from the original on December 24, 2014. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  6. ^ Boeheim & McCallum 2014, p. 9.
  7. ^ Stash, Mark (March 10, 2015). "Boeheim is Basketball". Life in the Finger Lakes. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  8. ^ Gutierrez, Matthew (March 21, 2019). "Jim Boeheim's legacy immortalized in Lyons, New York". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  9. ^ Hoffman, Louise (March 1, 1990). "University Place: Boeheimville". Syracuse University Magazine. 6 (3): 44–45. Retrieved March 28, 2023.
  10. ^ Waters, Mike (October 10, 2013). "Syracuse's Jim Boeheim looks back at his playing days at Lyons Central High School". Syracuse Post-Standard. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  11. ^ Slaughter, Marquel (March 9, 2023). "Jim Boeheim will be remembered for his NCAA success, but a Section V upset sticks with him". Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  12. ^ DeSain, Joshua (April 5, 2013). "Lyons native Jim Boeheim learned the 2-3 zone from the legendary Dick Blackwell". Finger Lakes Times. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  13. ^ Rhoden, William C. (March 7, 1988). "His Record of Success Is Sure, But Boeheim Is Still a Mystery". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  14. ^ Schneidman, David; Gutierrez, Matthew (April 11, 2019). "Before basketball, Jim Boeheim led the Syracuse golf team". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  15. ^ Casey, Kevin (April 2, 2016). "Jim Boeheim used to be Syracuse's golf coach, too". Golfweek. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  16. ^ a b "Boeheim Reflects on Career - Looks Towards Future". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  17. ^ Kornheiser, Tony (February 15, 1977). "At Syracuse, the Sleepers Become Giants of Eastern Basketball". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  18. ^ a b c Ramsey, Ethan (November 6, 2005). "The Odyssey: After 30 years of twists and turns, Jim Boeheim has evolved into a man much different than the one who started on Syracuse's sideline". The Daily Orange. Retrieved May 17, 2023.
  19. ^ Serby, Steve (March 11, 2012). "Serby's Sunday Q&A with Jim Boeheim". NY Post. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  20. ^ Vasudevan, Anish (March 20, 2023). "Jim Boeheim's 1st season as SU's head coach foreshadowed next 46 years of success". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  21. ^ a b Norlander, Matt (September 14, 2018). "Jim Boeheim is synonymous with Syracuse basketball, but one day he'll be replaced and here's who might get the job". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on October 2, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  22. ^ "No Move for Boeheim". The New York Times. March 11, 1986. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  23. ^ "Rejects OSU Job". Syracuse, New York: The Bryan Times. March 11, 1986. Archived from the original on April 8, 2022. Retrieved March 6, 2013.
  24. ^ Patrick Ewing Archived October 6, 2016, at the Wayback Machine. Georgetown Basketball History Project
  25. ^ Myslenski, Skip (October 2, 1992). "SYRACUSE HIT WITH 2 YEARS OF PROBATION". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  26. ^ Davis, Ken (October 2, 1992). "SYRACUSE PLACED ON TWO YEARS' PROBATION". Hartford Courant. Archived from the original on April 13, 2021. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  27. ^ Tracy, Marc (March 17, 2016). "Syracuse Was Aided by Self-Imposed Ban, but a Player Paid a Price". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on February 11, 2018. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  28. ^ Diamond, Jared (February 5, 2015). "Syracuse Self-Imposes Postseason Ban". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on August 2, 2020. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  29. ^ "Syracuse seals first losing season of Jim Boeheim's tenure with loss to Duke in ACC tournament". The Athletic. Archived from the original on March 13, 2022. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  30. ^ McAllister, Mike (March 13, 2022). "Syracuse Basketball Not Selected for NIT, 2021-22 Season is Over". Sports Illustrated Syracuse Orange News, Analysis and More. Archived from the original on March 14, 2022. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  31. ^ a b Voll, Chris (January 28, 2014). "The Buildup: How Jim Boeheim became the master of the 2-3 zone". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  32. ^ "Looking inside the Syracuse 2–3 zone". ESPN.com. January 13, 2003. Archived from the original on March 23, 2009. Retrieved January 22, 2006.
  33. ^ Voll, Chris (January 29, 2014). "Miles Ahead: Jim Boeheim's longtime signature defense puts Syracuse above the many programs now implementing more zone". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  34. ^ Fernandez, Roshan (December 5, 2021). "Why Jim Boeheim morphs his patented 2-3 zone into a 1-1-3 at times this year". The Daily Orange. Archived from the original on December 6, 2021. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  35. ^ Garrison, Drew (February 22, 2014). "Boeheim blows up, gets ejected". SBNation.com. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  36. ^ Auerbach, Nicole. "Ejection but not dejection: Jim Boeheim's night at Duke". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on January 21, 2020. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  37. ^ "1990 USA Basketball". USA Basketball. August 8–19, 1990. Archived from the original on October 14, 2007. Retrieved November 19, 2007.
  38. ^ "2006 USA Basketball". USA Basketball. August 19 – September 3, 2006. Archived from the original on October 14, 2007. Retrieved November 19, 2007.
  39. ^ "Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim will return as Mike Krzyzewski's USA Basketball assistant coach". Syracuse.com. July 21, 2009. Archived from the original on February 19, 2010. Retrieved November 9, 2009.
  40. ^ "Krzyzewski continues as U.S. basketball coach". Reuters. July 21, 2009. Archived from the original on November 8, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2009.
  41. ^ "Jim Boeheim talks about another gold medal; recruiting, Lebron vs Jordan, and more (podcast)". Syracuse.com. August 19, 2012. Archived from the original on August 20, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  42. ^ "USA Basketball Announces 2009–12 Committees". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved March 26, 2009.
  43. ^ "NABC Presidents". National Association of Basketball Coaches. Archived from the original on August 8, 2014. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  44. ^ "2012–13 NABC Board of Directors". National Association of Basketball Coaches. Archived from the original on August 13, 2012. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  45. ^ Paine, Neil (March 28, 2016). "What The Hell Is Syracuse Doing In The Final Four?". Archived from the original on September 23, 2020. Retrieved September 16, 2020.
  46. ^ "Inside Syracuse's stunning comeback vs. Virginia". NCAA. Archived from the original on October 30, 2020. Retrieved September 16, 2020.
  47. ^ "Syracuse Orange Basketball 2016-2017". www.orangehoops.org. Archived from the original on October 31, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  48. ^ "Syracuse Orange Basketball 2017-2018". www.orangehoops.org. Archived from the original on May 15, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  49. ^ "Worst. Start. Ever. Syracuse loses to Virginia (Brent Axe recap)". syracuse. November 7, 2019. Archived from the original on September 15, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  50. ^ "Syracuse Advances to ACC Tournament Quarterfinals, Defeats UNC". spectrumlocalnews.com. Archived from the original on March 8, 2022. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  51. ^ "Syracuse Gets Lighter Penalty Than Expected: College basketball: Sanctions include a ban from NCAA tournament this season and two years' probation for the school's athletic program". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. October 2, 1992. Archived from the original on February 21, 2015. Retrieved March 10, 2015.
  52. ^ McMurphy, Brett (October 29, 2014). "SU basketball, football focus of NCAA". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on March 10, 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  53. ^ Schonbrun, Zach (March 6, 2015). "Syracuse Basketball and Coach Jim Boeheim Hit Hard by N.C.A.A." The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  54. ^ "Syracuse wins back 1 scholarship per year in NCAA appeal, still must vacate wins". syracuse.com. November 25, 2015. Archived from the original on November 5, 2016. Retrieved August 22, 2016.
  55. ^ Schonbrun, Zach (March 6, 2015). "Faulting Coach Jim Boeheim, N.C.A.A. Hits Syracuse Hard". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 6, 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  56. ^ "Players and explanations involved in Syracuse men's basketball's vacated wins revealed". The Daily Orange. November 4, 2016. Archived from the original on September 8, 2018. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  57. ^ a b syracuse.com (October 19, 2016). "Syracuse basketball can't keep wins, but it can keep Big East, NCAA banners". syracuse.com. Archived from the original on December 19, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  58. ^ a b "Cuse gets back 4 scholarships; no Boeheim ruling". ESPN.com. November 25, 2015. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  59. ^ "Boeheim ban upheld, but will start Saturday". ESPN.com. December 3, 2015. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  60. ^ "Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim to retire in three years". March 18, 2015. Archived from the original on December 30, 2017. Retrieved March 3, 2017.
  61. ^ Schonbrun, Zach (March 18, 2015). "Syracuse's Athletic Director Resigns; Jim Boeheim to Retire in 3 Years". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  62. ^ Becker, Jake (March 20, 2017). "Jim Boeheim delays retirement, signs contract extension with Syracuse". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on March 23, 2017. Retrieved June 26, 2017.
  63. ^ Axe, Brent (March 20, 2017). "Jim Boeheim's contract extension proves again that Syracuse needs him on that wall". Post Standard. Archived from the original on May 6, 2017. Retrieved May 28, 2017.
  64. ^ "Adrian Autry to Take Helm of Men's Basketball as Jim Boeheim's Storied Career Comes to an End". Syracuse University News (Press release). March 8, 2023. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  65. ^ Cobb, David (March 8, 2023). "Jim Boeheim done as Syracuse coach after 47 seasons, Adrian Autry steps in to lead Orange basketball program". CBS Sports. Retrieved March 8, 2023.
  66. ^ Zagoria, Adam; Witz, Billy (March 8, 2023). "Jim Boeheim Out as Syracuse Coach After 47 Seasons". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  67. ^ Domin, Hank (March 10, 2023). "'I'm thrilled to be retired:' Jim Boeheim talks about final days as Syracuse basketball coach (press conference roundup)". Syracuse.com. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  68. ^ Waters, Mike (March 10, 2023). "Boeheim isn't leaving SU yet: 'I wouldn't know what else to do, anyway'". Syracuse Post-Standard. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  69. ^ Waters, Mike (March 16, 2023). "Jim Boeheim's new job title at Syracuse: Special assistant to the athletic director". syracuse.com. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  70. ^ McAllister, Mike (March 8, 2023). "Jim Boeheim's Career, Legacy Speak For Themselves". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  71. ^ Szuba, James (March 9, 2023). "Jim Boeheim meant everything to Syracuse". Troy Nunes Is An Absolute Magician. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  72. ^ a b Thamel, Pete (March 9, 2023). "The complicated legacy of Jim Boeheim's life at Syracuse". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  73. ^ Forde, Pat (March 8, 2023). "Syracuse Stalwart: Jim Boeheim Retires as the Ultimate Loyalist". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  74. ^ McMenamin, Dave (March 16, 2023). "'It's a huge loss for college basketball': Jim Boeheim's exit ends a coaching generation". ESPN. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  75. ^ Board (March 12, 2023). "Jim Boeheim put Syracuse on the map and made it a better place to live (Editorial Board Opinion)". Syracuse Post-Standard. Advance Media.
  76. ^ "Boeheim Receives Honor". The New York Times. March 8, 1991. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  77. ^ "Basketball Hall of Fame Profile". Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. September 2005. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved November 19, 2007.
  78. ^ Kekis, John (February 23, 1997). "Syracuse continues late-season surge as Jim Boeheim notches 500th win". AP News. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  79. ^ a b c "NCAA Division I Coaching Records" (PDF). NCAA. August 23, 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 27, 2008. Retrieved November 19, 2007.
  80. ^ "Boeheim wins 800th as Syracuse takes opener". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 9, 2009. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  81. ^ Ennis, Connor (February 15, 2009). "Calhoun and Boeheim Close In on 800". The New York Times / The Quad. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  82. ^ "Syracuse's Jim Boeheim wins 900th game". USA Today. December 17, 2012. Archived from the original on August 2, 2020. Retrieved December 18, 2012.
  83. ^ Waters, Mike (February 4, 2017). "Syracuse basketball upsets No. 9 Virginia to give Jim Boeheim his '1,000th' win". Syracuse Post-Standard. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  84. ^ Grossman, Connor (February 4, 2017). "Jim Boeheim on unofficial 1,000 wins: 'I know how many wins I've had'". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  85. ^ "Coach K wins 1,000th game at Duke". AP News. November 12, 2017. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  86. ^ "Jim Boeheim gets 1,000th win as Syracuse tops Northeastern". AP News. November 20, 2022. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  87. ^ Schiff, Tyler (November 20, 2022). "Jim Boeheim reaches 1,000 official wins in 76-48 win over Northeastern". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  88. ^ "SU to name Carrier Dome Court in honor of Jim Boeheim". suathletics.com. December 21, 2001. Archived from the original on April 8, 2022. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  89. ^ "Mayoral decree of Jim Boeheim day" (PDF). Syracuse Mayor Matt Driscoll. February 24, 2002. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 27, 2008. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  90. ^ "Syracuse survives 6OT thriller vs. Connecticut". ESPN.com. Associated Press. March 13, 2009. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  91. ^ "Six decades of excellence". Twitter @CBBonFOX. Fox College Hoops. March 19, 2021. Archived from the original on March 20, 2021. Retrieved March 20, 2021.
  92. ^ Vecsey, George (April 1, 1996). "Sports of The Times;They're the Oscar and Felix of the Hardwood Set". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  93. ^ Crane, Andrew; Emerman, Danny (February 8, 2021). "LASTING IMPRESSIONS: A look at Jim Boeheim's 1st moments with 5 decades of recruits". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  94. ^ "Syracuse hires former hoops star Allen Griffin as assistant". ESPN. April 7, 2017. Archived from the original on June 11, 2017. Retrieved June 26, 2017.
  95. ^ Katz, Andy (August 6, 2009). "Off the court Boeheim focuses on helping others beat cancer". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on October 29, 2014. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  96. ^ "Jim Boeheim's personal crusade – fighting cancer". nabc.cstv.com. Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved December 31, 2008.
  97. ^ Ogle, Mike (March 26, 2009). "Boeheim the Coach Outdone by Boeheim the Fund-Raiser". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 24, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2009.
  98. ^ Ogle, Mike (March 27, 2009). "The Charitable Side of Boeheim". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  99. ^ Waters, Mike (May 30, 2012). "Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim keeps working for cancer breakthrough". Syracuse.com. Archived from the original on December 24, 2014. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  100. ^ a b Culpepper, Chuck (March 25, 2021). "Buddy Boeheim thought he would just be a role player. His role now is Syracuse's leading man". Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 25, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  101. ^ Roth, Leo (November 4, 2018). "They've got game: Jim Boeheim gives scouting reports on his kids Buddy, Jimmy and Jamie". Democrat and Chronicle. Archived from the original on April 12, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  102. ^ "Boeheim exiting Cornell in wake of Ivy decision". ESPN. Associated Press. November 17, 2020. Archived from the original on November 19, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  103. ^ Borzello, Jeff (April 16, 2021). "Jimmy Boeheim transferring to Syracuse Orange basketball to join brother Buddy Boeheim, dad Jim Boeheim". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  104. ^ "Jimmy Boeheim at Syracuse". cuse.com. Retrieved March 23, 2023.
  105. ^ Zagoria, Adam (March 25, 2021). "The Son Shoots, the Father Shouts, and Syracuse Keeps Winning". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 25, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  106. ^ "Pistons sign Buddy Boeheim to two-way contract". ESPN.com. July 2, 2022. Retrieved July 14, 2022.
  107. ^ "Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim hits, kills pedestrian walking along highway". USA Today. February 21, 2019. Archived from the original on February 21, 2019.
  108. ^ "Syracuse's Boeheim facing lawsuit in fatal crash". November 10, 2020. Archived from the original on December 18, 2021. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  109. ^ "Syracuse's Jim Boeheim involved in fatal car accident". ESPN. February 21, 2019. Archived from the original on February 21, 2019.
  110. ^ "Boeheim cleared of wrongdoing in fatal accident". ESPN.com. March 7, 2019. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 8, 2019.
  111. ^ Chiarella, Tom (September 11, 2019). "Jim Boeheim's First Interview Since the Crash That Claimed a Man's Life". Esquire. Archived from the original on February 6, 2020. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  112. ^ Matthews, Karen (April 26, 2023). "Family of man fatally struck by Boeheim agrees to settlement". AP News. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  113. ^ Libonati, Chris (March 15, 2016). "Former beat writers reflect on 40 years of Jim Boeheim". The Daily Orange. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  114. ^ Moran, Malcolm (March 21, 1987). "PLAYERS; BOEHEIM TAKES ON CRITICS". The New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2023.
  115. ^ "Jim Boeheim in Hot Water After 'Short' Remark About Reporter". March 4, 2021. Archived from the original on December 23, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  116. ^ "WATCH: Jim Boeheim critical of reporter's take on Syracuse". Archived from the original on March 10, 2021. Retrieved December 23, 2021.
  117. ^ "NCAA Career Statistics". NCAA. Archived from the original on May 11, 2019. Retrieved August 22, 2016.

Further reading