President Joe Biden began his presidency with fewer vacancies to fill than his predecessor.[1][2] President Biden pledged to nominate people with diverse backgrounds and professional experience.[3] Biden has also pledged to nominate the first Black woman to the Supreme Court of the United States.[4]

By the end of 2021, 41 judges had been confirmed, the most since Ronald Reagan.[1] By the end of his first year in office, Biden had nominated 73 individuals for federal judgeships, one more than president Donald Trump during the same point in his presidency.[5]

Supreme Court

Confirmed nominee

Supreme Court of the United States

Main article: Ketanji Brown Jackson Supreme Court nomination

Appellate nominees

Confirmed nominees

United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

Stalled nominees

United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit

District court nominees

Confirmed nominees

United States District Court for the District of Colorado

United States District Court for the District of Nevada

United States District Court for the District of New Jersey

United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York


Stalled nominees

United States District Court for the Central District of California

United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin

See also

References

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