Joe Ciampi
Joe Ciampi with Army women
Ciampi with Army in the late 1970s.
Biographical details
Born (1946-09-25) September 25, 1946 (age 75)
Glen Lyon, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1966–1967Mansfield State
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1968–1972Nanticoke Area HS (boys' asst.)
1972–1977Marlboro Central HS (boys')
1977–1979Army (women's)
1979–2004Auburn (women's)
2012–2013Atlanta Dream (asst.)
Head coaching record
Overall73–23 (.760) (high school)
607–213 (.740) (college)
Tournaments27–16 (NCAA Division I)
5–0 (WNIT)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Awards
  • 3× SEC Coach of the Year (1985, 1988, 1989)
Women's Basketball Hall of Fame

Joseph R. Ciampi (born September 25, 1946) is a retired American basketball coach. Starting off in boys basketball from 1968 to 1977, Ciampi was an assistant coach for a Nanticoke high school and the head coach for Marlboro High School in New York. In women's basketball, Ciampi coached the Army Black Knights women's basketball team from 1977 to 1979 before joining the Auburn Tigers women's basketball team in 1979. With the Tigers, Ciampi and his team reached the NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament final consecutively from 1988 to 1990. After winning his 600th game as a Division I coach in January 2004, Ciampi retired from basketball in March 2004.

With his stints with the Army Knights and Tigers, Ciampi retired with 607 wins and 213 losses. In the mid 2000s, Ciampi's record of 607 wins was in the top 15 overall wins by a Division I basketball coach during the late 2000s. After working as a women's basketball sports commentator for Comcast during the early 2010s, Ciampi briefly returned to basketball as an assistant coach for the Atlanta Dream from 2012 to 2013. Ciampi was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2005 and the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 2006.

Early life and education

On September 25, 1946, Ciampi was born in Glen Lyon, Pennsylvania.[1] At Nanticoke Area High School in Nanticoke, Pennsylvania, Ciampi started playing basketball and baseball.[2][3][4] Ciampi then attended Mansfield State College (now Mansfield University of Pennsylvania), graduating with a bachelor's degree in elementary education in 1968.[5][6][7] At Mansfield State, Ciampi played varsity basketball in the 1966–67 season.[8]

Coaching career

High school basketball (1968–1977)

After graduating from college, Ciampi began his career as a high school gym teacher.[6][9] In boys' basketball, Ciampi was an assistant coach from 1968 to 1972 at Nanticoke Area High School, helping Nanticoke reach an 82–19 record in four years.[10][11] Continuing his boys basketball experience in Marlboro, New York, Ciampi worked as the head coach for Marlboro High School between 1972 and 1977. With Marlboro, Ciampi had 73 wins and 23 losses.[12]

Army (1977–1979)

In 1977, Ciampi joined the United States Military Academy to be head coach for Army Cadets women's basketball, the program's first head coach at the NCAA Division I level. With Army, Ciampi went 18–5 in 1977–78 and 21–5 in 1978–79 for a total of 39 wins and 10 losses.[13]

Auburn (1979–2004)

In 1979, Ciampi joined Auburn University as head coach of the Auburn Tigers women's basketball team. Inheriting a program that had won only 17 games in the past two seasons, Ciampi led Auburn to a 17–13 record in the 1979–80 season.[12] Auburn would later reach the final of the NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament three consecutive times from 1988 to 1990.[12]

Apart from the NCAA tournament, Ciampi led Auburn to the 2003 Women's National Invitation Tournament title.[14][12] While coaching the Tigers, Ciampi earned his 600th win as a Division I basketball coach in January 2004.[12] That year, Ciampi ended his Auburn head coach position with 568 wins and 203 losses.[15] Upon his retirement from basketball in March 2004, Ciampi had an overall college basketball record of 607 wins and 213 losses.[16] With his 607 wins, Ciampi was in the top 15 for the most NCAA Division I basketball wins during the mid 2000s.[17] By the end of the 2010s, Ciampi's 607 wins made him tied for 34th place alongside Mike Granel for the most basketball games won overall by a Division I coach.[18]

Later career

After retiring from Auburn, Ciampi was a consultant to several NCAA Division I women's basketball teams.[19] In the early 2010s, Ciampi was a sports commentator for SportSouth on women's basketball games played in the Southeastern Conference.[20]

In 2012, Ciampi came out of retirement to become an assistant coach for the Atlanta Dream in the WNBA.[21] He continued to coach for the Dream until 2013.[22] The Dream went 19–15 in 2012 under head coaches Marynell Meadors and Fred Williams and 17–17 in 2013 under Williams, qualifying for the playoffs in both years, including as runners-up in the 2013 WNBA Finals.[23]

Ciampi continues to be a women's basketball analyst for the Auburn Sports Network and SEC Network.[24]

Awards and honors

In 2005, Ciampi was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame.[25] The following year, Cimapi became a part of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 2006.[1]

Personal life

Ciampi is married and has four children.[26]

Head coaching record

College

Sources:[27][12][28][29]

Statistics overview
Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Army Cadets (NCAA Division I independent) (1977–1979)
1977–78 Army 18–5
1978–79 Army 21–5
Army: 39–10 (.796)
Auburn Tigers (Southeastern Conference) (1979–2004)
1979–80 Auburn 17–13
1980–81 Auburn 26–7
1981–82 Auburn 24–5 NCAA Division I First Round
1982–83 Auburn 24–8 6–2 T–1st (West) NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1983–84 Auburn 19–10 4–4 4th (West)
1984–85 Auburn 25–6 5–3 2nd (West) NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1985–86 Auburn 24–6 6–3 T–2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1986–87 Auburn 31–2 8–1 1st NCAA Division I Elite Eight
1987–88 Auburn 32–3 9–0 1st NCAA Division I Runner-up
1988–89 Auburn 32–2 9–0 1st NCAA Division I Runner-up
1989–90 Auburn 28–7 7–2 T–2nd NCAA Division I Runner-up
1990–91 Auburn 26–6 7–2 2nd NCAA Division I Elite Eight
1991–92 Auburn 17–12 4–7 T–7th
1992–93 Auburn 25–4 9–2 T–2nd NCAA Division I Sweet 16
1993–94 Auburn 20–10 6–5 6th
1994–95 Auburn 17–10 5–6 8th NCAA Division I Second Round
1995–96 Auburn 23–9 6–5 T–5th NCAA Division I Elite Eight
1996–97 Auburn 22–10 5–7 T–7th NCAA Division I Second Round
1997–98 Auburn 16–11 4–10 T–9th
1998–99 Auburn 20–9 8–6 4th NCAA Second Round
1999–2000 Auburn 22–8 9–5 4th NCAA Second Round
2000–01 Auburn 17–12 5–9 T–8th
2001–02 Auburn 16–13 3–11 T–10th
2002–03 Auburn 23–11 5–9 8th WNIT Champion
2003–04 Auburn 22–9 9–5 3rd NCAA Division I Second Round
Auburn: 568–203 (.737) 145–104 (.582)
Total: 607–213 (.740)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References

  1. ^ a b "Joe Ciampi". Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  2. ^ Keatley, Don (May 5, 1974). "In Marlboro Country They Love Joe Ciampi". Wilkes-Barre Times Leader Evening News. p. 3D.
  3. ^ Friefeld, Robert (November 16, 1972). "5 Coaches Prepare For Debut". Poughkeepsie Journal. p. 26.
  4. ^ McMillan, Ken (December 20, 2003). "A sturdy foundation for Ciampi". Times Herald-Record. Middletown, N.Y. Archived from the original on August 23, 2004. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  5. ^ Sembrat, Steve (February 19, 1988). "However you say it, Ciampi is a winner". The Times-Leader. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. p. 5C.
  6. ^ a b Ferraro, Mike (December 21, 2003). "Master Motivator". Poughkeepsie Journal. p. 4H.
  7. ^ Carontawan 1968. Mansfield State College. 1968. p. 82. Retrieved October 28, 2020 – via Internet Archive.
  8. ^ Carontawan 1967. Mansfield State College. 1967. p. 145. Retrieved October 28, 2020 – via Internet Archive.
  9. ^ Thomaselli, Rich (February 19, 1989). "Former Malboro coach Ciampi has known nothing but winning years". Poughkeepsie Journal. p. 8D.
  10. ^ "Joe Ciampi returning 'home' with 3rd-ranked Lady Tigers". Citizen's Voice. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. February 18, 1988. p. 55.
  11. ^ Thomaselli 1989, p. 1D
  12. ^ a b c d e f "Joe Ciampi". AuburnTigers.com. Auburn University. Archived from the original on December 28, 2003. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  13. ^ Army West Point Women's Basketball 2016-17 Record Book (PDF). 2016. pp. 15, 28. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  14. ^ Dodge, Tom (April 6, 2003). "It's great to be that other Tiger". Daily World. Opelousas, Louisiana. p. 5B.
  15. ^ "Auburn Women's Basketball 2019-20 Record Book" (PDF). Auburn University Athletics. December 19, 2019. p. 118. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  16. ^ "Auburn Women's Basketball Coach Joe Ciampi Announces Retirement". AuburnTigers.com. Auburn University. Archived from the original on June 29, 2004. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  17. ^ Worlock, David (November 2005). "Official 2006 NCAA® Women's Basketball Records Book" (PDF) (Press release). Indianapolis: National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 119. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  18. ^ "Women's Basketball Coaching Records Through 2018-19" (PDF). NCAA. 2019. p. 10. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  19. ^ "Joe Ciampi". WNBA. Archived from the original on May 23, 2013. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  20. ^ "Atlanta Dream Announces Joe Ciampi as Assistant Coach". Oursportscentral. January 11, 2012. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  21. ^ McMillian, Ken (January 18, 2012). "Former Marlboro coach Ciampi decides to come back for Dream job". Times Herald-Record. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  22. ^ "Auburn Women's Basketball: Former coach Joe Ciampi named SEC Legend". Opelika-Auburn News. February 13, 2014. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  23. ^ "Atlanta Dream". Basketball Reference. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  24. ^ "Talking Tigers Podcast - Joe Ciampi". Auburn University. October 29, 2018. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  25. ^ "Joe Ciampi". Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  26. ^ Zimich, John (March 19, 1987). "Ciampi eyes 1st appearance in Final Four". Citizen's Voice. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. p. 67.
  27. ^ "NCAA Statistics: Joe Ciampi". NCAA. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  28. ^ Auburn Women's Basketball 2019-20 Record Book (PDF). Auburn University. 2019. pp. 118, 121–122.
  29. ^ SEC 2019-20 Women's Basketball Record Book (PDF). Southeastern Conference. 2019. pp. 36–37.