Joe Madro
Joe Madro 1959.jpg
Personal information
Born:(1913-03-21)March 21, 1913
Cleveland, Ohio
Died:September 24, 1994(1994-09-24) (aged 81)
Alameda, California
Career information
High school:Shaker Heights (OH), John Adams (OH)
College:Ohio State
Position:Coach, Offensive Guard (College)
Career history
As a coach:
Career highlights and awards
  • AFL champion (1963)
  • Super Bowl champion (XV)

Joseph Charles Madro (March 21, 1913 – September 24, 1994) was an American football coach in the National Football League (NFL) for 25 seasons, primarily with the Los Angeles Chargers. He played offensive guard at Ohio State.

Early life

Joe Madro was born on March 21, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio. He went to high school at Shaker Heights (OH), and John Adams (OH).

College career

He played offensive guard at Ohio State. He later coached the offensive line.

Coaching career

Cincinnati Bearcats

He was the Cincinnati Bearcats offensive line coach from 1949 to 1954.

Los Angeles Rams

From 1955 to 1957, he was the Los Angeles Rams Offensive Line Coach.[1] He was the defensive line coach in 1958, and the offensive backs coach in 1959.[1]

Los Angeles/San Diego Chargers

In 1960, he went to the Los Angeles Chargers to be with their head coach Sid Gillman. He had been with Gillman since he was in college. He was their offensive line coach for 12 seasons, from 1960 to 1972.[1] He won the 1963 AFL championship with the Chargers.

Houston Oilers

In 1972, he went to the Houston Oilers to become line coach. He was there for 3 seasons.[1]

Oakland Raiders

He did not coach in 1975 or in 1976. In 1977, he became an Assistant Coach for the Oakland Raiders.[2] He was there from 1977 to 1982. He won the Super Bowl in 1980.

Later life

He was Sid Gillman's presenter when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.[3] He died on September 24, 1994 in Alameda, California. He was 81 at the time of his death.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Joe Madro Coaching Record - Pro Football Archives". www.profootballarchives.com.
  2. ^ "Joe Madro | Pro Football History.com". pro-football-history.com.
  3. ^ "Sid Gillman | Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site". www.profootballhof.com.