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Johnny Davis
No. 38
Position:Fullback
Personal information
Born: (1956-07-17) July 17, 1956 (age 64)
Montgomery, Alabama
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school:Montgomery (AL) Sidney Lanier
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:1978 / Round: 2 / Pick: 30
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing Yards:1,094
Rush Attempts:314
Rushing TDs:15
Games played:119
Player stats at NFL.com · PFR

Johnny Lee Davis (born July 17, 1956[citation needed]) is a retired American football running back who played ten seasons in the NFL (1978–1987). Davis was a member of the 1981 San Francisco 49ers team that won Super Bowl XVI. He is a graduate of Sidney Lanier High School in Montgomery, Alabama, and the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

High school career

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Davis was a team captain as a senior at Sidney Lanier High School in Montgomery, Alabama. He was a four-year letter winner for coach Bill Joiner as a running back and linebacker. He also made the Coach and Athlete magazine High School All-America Team in 1973, the Birmingham News First Team All-State 1973, All-Class 4A 1973, All-City 1973, and was named Mr. Back in Montgomery. He rushed for 1,152 yards on 250 carries with six touchdowns as a senior. In the AHSAA North-South All-Star Game in 1974, he was named the Most Valuable Back. He also earned five letters in track, competing in discus and shot put.

College career (1974–1978)

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Davis played for the University of Alabama under coach Paul W. "Bear" Bryant and is one of the legendary "wishbone fullbacks".[citation needed] He lettered three of the four years of his college career.[citation needed] On November 23, 1977, Coach Bryant called him "the best fullback I've ever coached" in The Tuscaloosa News.[citation needed] Nicknamed "Bull", Davis led the Crimson Tide in rushing in three of his four seasons at Alabama, and he ranked third all-time at Alabama with 2,519 career rushing yards on 447 attempts, 5.64 average yards per carry, and 21 touchdowns.[citation needed] He was a member of the 2nd Team All-SEC 1975, 2nd Team All-SEC 1976, 2nd Team UPI All-America Team 1977, 1st Team All-SEC 1977, and Alabama Team of the Decade 1970s.[citation needed] He was also named to the 1977 Churchmen Hall of Fame All-America Team, which honors players for on-field performance and church work off the field.[citation needed] Davis was ABC-TV and Chevrolet Most Outstanding Offensive Player of the Game vs. Auburn in 1975 when he rushed for 98 yards on 18 carries, the Dixie Howell Memorial Award Winner at the 1975 Spring A-Day Game, and ABC-TV and Chevrolet Most Outstanding Offensive Player of the Game vs. LSU in 1977 when he rushed for 126 yards on 23 carries.[citation needed] He competed in the Orange Bowl, Liberty Bowl, and two Sugar Bowls.[citation needed] As a senior, Davis was the top rusher in inaugural match-up vs. Ohio State, with 95 yards on 24 rushing attempts while leading the Crimson Tide to a 38–6 win over the Buckeyes in the 1978 Sugar Bowl.[citation needed] He was invited to the 1978 Senior Bowl and named the South's Most Outstanding Offensive Player, leading the South with 109 rushing yards on 23 carries and scoring a touchdown.[citation needed] While at Alabama, Davis and Ozzie Newsome were roommates throughout their college careers and remain best friends to this day.[citation needed] Davis is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity.[citation needed]

Alabama school records

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Among Alabama school records, Davis ranks ninth in career rushing with 2,519 yards, and is the only fullback in the top ten of all-time rushers, ranking fourth with a career average of 5.64 yards per carry, for those with a minimum of 400 attempts.[citation needed] Davis ranks third all-time with a 6.67 yards per carry single-season average, for those with a minimum of 100 attempts, achieved in the 1975 season.[citation needed] He led his team in rushing three consecutive years (1975–1977) and is tied for seventh with seven career 100-yard rushing performances.[citation needed] He holds the record for most 100-yard rushing performances by a fullback with seven.[citation needed] He achieved the longest run from scrimmage in the 1975 season (66-yard TD vs. TCU) and in the 1976 season (58-yard TD vs. LSU).[citation needed] He also achieved the most rushing yards in a single game in the 1975 season (155 yards vs. Washington) and the 1977 season (153 yards vs. Vanderbilt).[citation needed]

Alabama statistical highlights

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Professional career highlights

Davis was drafted in round two of the 1978 NFL draft, 30th overall, by The Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[citation needed] As a blocking fullback for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Davis opened holes for tailback Ricky Bell's best rushing season in 1979, helping his team win the NFC Central Division.[citation needed] He played in the 1980 NFC Championship Game with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[citation needed]

In 1981, Davis played for the San Francisco 49ers, where he won a Super Bowl XVI ring.[citation needed] Nicknamed "Goal Line", he averaged a touchdown every 13 times he carried the ball for the 49ers.[citation needed] Davis was the first African-American player from the University of Alabama to win a Super Bowl,[citation needed] winning Super Bowl XVI in 1981 with the San Francisco 49ers. He was their third leading scorer and third best rusher, scoring a season total of 42 points on 7 TDs.[citation needed] He played in all 19 games; five as the starter, and rushed twice for five yards in the Super Bowl.[1] He scored a TD in the 1982 NFC Championship Game, in which the 49ers defeated the Dallas Cowboys.[citation needed]

In 1982, he signed with the Cleveland Browns and played alongside his college roommate and best friend Ozzie Newsome. While with the Browns, he was nicknamed the "B1 Bomber".[citation needed] He received the "Captain's Award" in 1984, an honor voted by his teammates as the individual representing the essence of being a Cleveland Browns player.[citation needed] He played in the 1986 AFC Championship Game with the Cleveland Browns.[citation needed] He earned two game balls for special teams play with the Cleveland Browns. He was described in the Cleveland Browns media guide by those who knew him as "unselfish, hard-working and always smiling. B-1 is a powerful blocker and an excellent kickoff coverage man."[citation needed] He retired from the NFL in 1988 after ten years. He was a tough inside runner and considered one of the best blocking fullbacks in NFL history.[citation needed] He played in 119 regular season games, started 32, and had 1,200 yards from scrimmage, 15 rushing touchdowns, 1,094 rushing yards on 314 rushing attempts for 3.5 average yards per carry, along with 22 receptions and 106 receiving yards in his career.[1]

Head coaches

Post-football

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Davis worked as an advertising sales manager for 20 years. He currently[when?] works as an educator, is a motivational speaker and conducts football camps for kids. In addition, Davis is an accomplished professional jazz and gospel pianist. He works in the town of West New York, New Jersey.

References

  1. ^ a b "Johnny Davis Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved March 18, 2019.