Johns Hopkins Blue Jays football
First season1882
Athletic directorJennifer S. Baker
Head coachDan Wodicka
1st season, 0–0 (–)
StadiumHomewood Field
(capacity: 8,500)
LocationBaltimore, Maryland
ConferenceCentennial Conference
All-time record584–489–57 (.542)
Playoff appearances12
Conference titles23
RivalriesMcDaniel
Consensus All-Americans28 Individuals
(Since 1980 to 2021)
ColorsHopkins blue and black[1]
   
Fight songTo Win
Johnny Hopkins, On to Victory
Websitehopkinssports.com

The Johns Hopkins Blue Jays football team represents Johns Hopkins University in the sport of American football. The Blue Jays compete in Division III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as members of the Centennial Conference. Johns Hopkins has fielded a team since 1882. Johns Hopkins has won or shared 13 Centennial Conference titles since the 2002 season, including 10 straight titles through the 2018 season.

History

Hopkins' first team was assembled in 1881, and spent an entire year training and learning a version of the game. Their sport, which was closer to rugby, was played in Druid Hill Park. After the training, the team planned a two-game 1882 season. The squad had to play the season under the title of the Clifton Athletic Club, due to the school's policy on the sport of football. The first was a practice game with the Baltimore Athletic Club, played on October 7. The Hopkins team lost the contest 4–0. The following game was their first true game, to be played against the Naval Academy.[2][3]

Seasons

Year Coach Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# D3°
No coach (Independent) (1882–1894)
No coach: 24–33–5 (.427)
George Burlingame (Independent) (1895, 1897–1898)
Burlingame: 7–10–1 (.417)
Ivan Thorson & Bond (Independent) (1899–1900)
Thorson & Bond: 9–3–2 (.714)
Byron W. Dickinson (Independent) (1901–1902)
Dickinson: 6–3–2 (.636)
Lawrence Lee Iseman (Independent) (1904–1905)
Iseman: 8–2–4 (.714)
Patrick McDonnell & Alexander Randall (Independent) (1906)
McDonell & Randall: 2–5–1 (.313)
J. Abner Saylor (Independent) (1907–1908)
Saylor: 7–5–3 (.567)
Thomas Lynn (Independent) (1909–1910)
Lynn: 11–3–1 (.767)
Edwin Harlan (Independent) (1911)
Harland: 4–5 (.444)
Max Rohde (Independent) (1912)
Rohde: 0–9 (.000)
John H. Gates (Independent) (1913–1914)
Gates: 3–11–1 (.233)
Charles Brickley (Independent) (1915)
Brickey: 6–2 (.750)
Harry E. Brennick (Independent) (1916)
Brennick: 2–7 (.222)
B. Russell Murphy (Independent) (1917–1919)
Murphy: 6–11–4 (.381)
Ray Van Orman (Independent) (1920–1935)
Van Orman: 60–64–7 (.485)
C. Gardner Mallonee (Independent) (1936–1942, 1943–1945)
Mallonee: 17–26–6 (.408)
Howdy Myers (Mason–Dixon Conference) (1946–1949)
1946 Myers 5–3 2–0 2nd
1947 Myers 5–2–1
1948 Myers 7–1 3–0 1st
1949 Myers 4–4 2–1 T–2nd
Myers: 21–10–1 (.691)
Myers: 26–14–1 (.646) (including 1979)
Charles H. Guy (Mason–Dixon Conference) (1950)
1950 Guy 3–4–1 0–2–1 8th
Guy: 3–4–1 (.438)
Frank R. Burns (Mason–Dixon Conference) (1951–1952)
1951 Burns 2–5–1 0–2–1 5th
1952 Burns 4–4 1–2 T–3rd
Burns: 6–9–1 (.406) (.406)
John Bridgers (Mason–Dixon Conference) (1953–1956)
1953 Bridgers 2–6 0–3 6th
1954 Bridgers 2–6 1–2 5th
1955 Bridgers 2–6 0–2 5th
1956 Bridgers 4–3–1 3–0 1st
Bridgers: 10–21–1 (.359) (.328)
Wilson L. Fewster (Mason–Dixon Conference, Middle Atlantic Conference South (1958~)[a]) (1957–1965)
1957 Fewster 3–2–2 1–1–1 3rd
1958 Fewster 5–3 5–1 2nd
1959 Fewster 7–1 6–0 1st[b]
1960 Fewster 5–2–1 5–1 1st
1961 Fewster 3–4–1 2–3–1 6th
1962 Fewster 2–6 2–4 7th
1963 Fewster 0–6–1 0–4–1 11th
1964 Fewster 2–6 2–4 9th
1965 Fewster 1–6–1 1–4–1 10th
Fewster: 28–36–6 (.443)
Alex Sotir (Middle Atlantic Conference South & Mason–Dixon Conference) (1966–1970)
1966 Sotir 0–6–2 0–4–2 11th
1967 Sotir 6–1 6–0 1st
1968 Sotir 7–2 6–1 1st
1969 Sotir 5–4 5–2 1st
1970 Sotir 5–4 5–2 3rd
Sotir: 23–17–2 (.571)
Dennis Cox (Middle Atlantic Conference South & Mason–Dixon Conference (~1974)) (1971–1978)
1971 Cox 6–3 5–2 3rd
1972 Cox 6–3 5–2 3rd
1973 Cox 6–3 4–2 4th
1974 Cox 3–5–1 3–2–1 5th
1975 Cox 3–5–1 3–3–1 (3–2–1) 5th
1976 Cox 3–5–1 2–4–1 (2–3–1) 8th
1977 Cox 1–8–1 0–8–1 (0–6–1) 10th
1978 Cox 3–6 2–5 10th
Cox: 31–38–4 (.452)
Howdy Myers (Middle Atlantic Conference South) (1979)
1979 Myers 5–4 4–4 6th
Myers: 5–4 (.556)
Myers: 26–14–1 (.646) (incl. 1946–49)
Jerry Pfeifer (Middle Atlantic Conference South (~1982), Centennial Conference (1983~)) (1980–1989)
1980 Pfeifer 1–8 0–8 11th
1981 Pfeifer 7–2 6–2 2nd
1982 Pfeifer 3–6 2–6 9th
1983 Pfeifer 5–4 3–4 5th
1984 Pfeifer 5–4 3–4 5th
1985 Pfeifer 6–3 4–3 4th
1986 Pfeifer 3–5–1 2–4–1 5th
1987 Pfeifer 4–6 3–4 5th
1988 Pfeifer 1–9 1–6 7th
1989 Pfeifer 1–9 1–6 8th
Pfeifer: 36–56–1 (.392) 25–47–1 (.349)
Jim Margraff (Centennial Conference) (1990–2018)
1990 Margraff 5–4–1 4–2–1 3rd
1991 Margraff 5–4–1 3–4 4th
1992 Margraff 6–4 4–3 T–3rd
1993 Margraff 4–6 2–5 6th
1994 Margraff 4–6 4–3 4th
1995 Margraff 6–3–1 4–2–1 3rd
1996 Margraff 7–3 5–2 3rd
1997 Margraff 7–3 5–2 3rd
1998 Margraff 7–3 5–2 T–2nd
1999 Margraff 4–6 3–4 5th
2000 Margraff 5–5 4–3 T–4th
2001 Margraff 6–3 4–2 3rd
2002 Margraff 9–2 5–1 T–1st
2003 Margraff 10–1 5–1 T–1st 24 25
2004 Margraff 9–2 4–2 T–1st
2005 Margraff 8–3 5–1 1st
2006 Margraff 5–5 3–3 T–3rd
2007 Margraff 4–6 3–5 7th
2008 Margraff 8–3 6–2 T–2nd
2009 Margraff 10–3 7–1 1st 8 11
2010 Margraff 8–3 7–2 T–1st
2011 Margraff 10–1 9–0 1st 19 18
2012 Margraff 10–2 8–1 1st 12 22
2013 Margraff 10–1 9–0 1st 12 12
2014 Margraff 11–1 9–0 1st 10 10
2015 Margraff 11–1 9–0 1st 10 13
2016 Margraff 11–1 9–0 1st 9 11
2017 Margraff 9–2 8–1 T–1st 20 20
2018 Margraff 12–2 8–1 T–1st 5 5
Margraff: 221–89–3 (.711)
Greg Chimera (Centennial Conference) (2019–2023)
2019 Chimera 8–3 6–3 3rd
2020 Chimera Season cancelled
2021 Chimera 10–2 8–1 T–1st 13 14
2022 Chimera 10–1 8–1 2nd 21 21
2023 Chimera 12–1 6–0 1st 7 8
Chimera: 40–7 (.851) 28–5 (.848)
Dan Wodicka (Centennial Conference) (2024–present)
2024 Wodicka 0–0 0–0
Wodicka: 0–0 (–) 0–0 (–)
Total: 595–489–57 (.546)
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

Playoff appearances

NCAA Division III

The Blue Jays have appeared in the Division III playoffs twelve times, with an overall record of 12–12.

Year Round Opponent Result
2005 First Round Thiel L, 3–28
2009 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Hampden–Sydney
Thomas More
Wesley
W, 23–7
W, 31–29
L, 0–12
2011 First Round St. John Fisher L, 12–23
2012 First Round
Second Round
Washington & Jefferson
Mount Union
W, 42–10
L, 13–55
2013 First Round Wesley L, 24–29
2014 First Round
Second Round
Rowan
Hobart
W, 24–16
L, 21–24
2015 First Round
Second Round
Western New England
Wesley
W, 52–20
L, 37–42
2016 First Round
Second Round
Randolph–Macon
Mount Union
W, 42–21
L, 21–28
2017 First Round Washington & Jefferson L, 28–31
2018 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
MIT
Frostburg State
RPI
Mount Union
W, 49–0
W, 58–27
W, 37–14
L, 20–28
2021 First Round
Second Round
Salisbury
Mount Union
W, 45–20
L, 35–45
2023 First Round
Second Round
Quarterfinals
Western Connecticut
Union (NY)
Randolph–Macon
W, 62–20
W, 39–17
L, 36–39

Notable players

See also: List of Johns Hopkins Blue Jays in the NFL Draft

Bill Stromberg earned a B.A. from Hopkins in 1982 and became one of the most decorated athletes in the history of Johns Hopkins, making him "arguably the best football player in Johns Hopkins history."[4] He is considered one of the best wide receivers in NCAA Division III history as the holder of six national and 13 school records. Stromberg was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Hall of Fame and then elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2004, and was, as of 2017, the only Hopkins football player to be inducted there.[5][6] Hopkins constructed a new baseball field and athletic facilities which was named Stromberg Stadium in 2014 in his honor.[4][7]

After graduation, Stromberg signed as a free agent with the Philadelphia Eagles, played a few preseason games before pulling a hamstring, and was ultimately cut before the 1982 season began.[4] He became the CEO of Baltimore-based asset management firm T. Rowe Price in 2016.

Wide Receiver and National Lacrosse Hall of Famer Joe Cowan was drafted by the Baltimore Colts in 1969.[8]

Maryland Governor Wes Moore was a wide receiver for the Blue Jays while in college.

Notes

  1. ^ From 1958 to 1974 the Blue Jays football team played in both the Mason–Dixon Conference and the Middle Atlantic Conference (MAC) South. During that period, conference records and standings reflect those of the MAC South.
  2. ^ John Hopkins was the champion of both the Mason–Dixon Conference and the MAC South in 1959.
  1. D3Football.com rankings are available from 2003.[9]
  2. Coaches' Poll started to be released in 1999.[10]

References

  1. ^ "Johns Hopkins Athletics Quick Facts". HopkinsSports.com. June 15, 2018. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  2. ^ Patterson (2000), p. 3
  3. ^ Bealle, Morris Allison (1951). Gangway for Navy: The Story of Football at the United States Naval Academy, 1879–1950
  4. ^ a b c "Former JHU Football Star Bill Stromberg to Take Over As T. Rowe Price CEO". Johns Hopkins University HUB. 2015-05-11. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  5. ^ "Stromberg Selected to College Football Hall of Fame". Hopkins Sports News. 2004-05-13. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  6. ^ "Catching Up With Former Johns Hopkins Wide Receiver Bill Stromberg". Baltimore Sun. 2016-11-24. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  7. ^ "Johns Hopkins Athletics Facilities Receive Major Upgrades". Hopkins Gazette. 2014-10-11. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  8. ^ "Catching up with ... Former Johns Hopkins star, Colts draft pick Joe Cowan".
  9. ^ "D3football.com Top 25 history". D3football.com. Retrieved 6 March 2023.
  10. ^ "American Football Coaches Association Coaches Poll". www.afca.com. Retrieved 6 March 2023.